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How these female coaches are breaking barriers in the MLB

first_imgApril 1, 2021 /Sports News – National How these female coaches are breaking barriers in the MLB FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail33ft/iStockBy Danielle Genet, ABC News(NEW YORK) — April 1 is Opening Day for the sport long considered America’s “favorite pastime.” This season, MLB will have a record 23 female coaches in its lineup — either on the field or in professional-development roles. Among the women starting this season is 30-year-old Bianca Smith, who made history in January as the first Black woman hired as a minor league coach by the Boston Red Sox.“It was crazy,” she told ABC News’ Good Morning America of the moment she landed the role. “I’d been interviewing for a scouting position so the fact that they offered a coaching position was huge for me.” Smith, who had juggled multiple jobs and internships in the past, including assistant athletic director at Carroll University, is expected to primarily instruct minor leaguers in Fort Myers, Florida.She said her love of the sport started at an early age and was passed down by her mother, who died in 2013. “She’s the one who introduced me to the game when I was 3,” Smith shared. “She is a diehard Yankees fan. She would actually be cringing if she saw me even in the [Red Sox] sweatshirt right now.”Still, Smith said her mom was the person who motivated her as a kid. “She was the one who pushed me to play softball,” said Smith. “And she was the one who pushed me to just pursue my dream.”In 2019, 33-year-old Rachel Balkovec was hired by the Yankees as the first full-time female hitting coach in the minor leagues. “I mean the first word that comes to mind is just gratitude, just so many people involved and not just the men who have supported me and hired me, but also women that have come before me, so just really grateful,” Balkovec told GMA.Her role with the Yankees isn’t the first time she’s made history in professional baseball. In 2014, she was hired by the St. Louis Cardinals as the first full-time female strength and conditioning coordinator in the minor leagues.Balkovec said her mission is not just to excel as a coach on the field, but also be a “visible idea” to young girls of what’s possible since she said she didn’t have women working in baseball as role models when she was growing up. She uses social media to share her message as well as work as a mentor with young women. “I just understand that when I signed the paperwork with a major league organization. … I just understood that I was signing up for two jobs,” Balkovec shared. “I just know that being a visible idea is something that I know I need to do, but also what is on my heart and what I want to do.” As women breaking into a male-dominated industry, Balkovec and Smith said there are roadblocks and barriers that come with it.“With some perspective, I just always say, being an underdog is an advantage, and I’m glad that I had a longer path,” Balkovec explained. “It’s a gift when someone doesn’t respect you upfront and you have to earn it, because it means that much more when you do earn their respect.” Smith agreed, adding, “It’s that much more fun when people underestimate you and you prove them wrong.” Alyssa Nakken, 30, who made history as the first female full-time coach hired by a major league team when she was promoted to assistant coach by the San Francisco Giants, echoed Balkovec and Smith’s outlook on breaking barriers in a male-dominated industry. “Naturally we tend to just fall into comfort zones and like linear paths … and I think what’s really the most fun and interesting is when you sort of take a step or a turn off that path and then find yourself in a position that has never been done before,” Nakken said. “And then you can help guide and lead the way in helping others get to where they may not know where their ceiling is, and you may be able to help them find something that they never thought that they could do before.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved. Written bycenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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US Navy prepares for Hurricane Irma

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today US Navy prepares for Hurricane Irma View post tag: US Navy September 7, 2017 Share this article US Navy prepares for Hurricane Irma View post tag: Hurricane Irma Navy installations throughout Florida are preparing for heavy weather as Hurricane Irma approaches South Florida.Commander, Navy Region Southeast, Rear Adm. Bette Bolivar, directed the evacuation of non-essential personnel and family members from Naval Air Station Key West, Florida, Sept. 5. “Their safety and security is a top priority,” Bolivar said. Approximately 50-60 mission essential personnel are remaining behind to maintain essential functions on the installation. Naval Air Station Key West personnel have a designated safe haven area of within 300 miles of Atlanta. Personnel and family members need to muster with the installation, their command or through the Navy Family Accountability and Assistance System (NFAAS) website upon arrival to the safe haven area. At the Atlantic Undersea Test and Evaluation Center, 166 non-essential personnel and family members and 97 pets are being airlifted from the facility off the Florida coast. They will be headed to their designated safe haven. “Additionally,” Bolivar said, “I’ve directed that when mandatory orders are issued by competent civilian authorities in Florida counties that could be impacted by Hurricane Irma, non-essential active duty military, civilian employees, drilling reservists and authorized dependents residing in those counties are authorized to evacuate.”Personnel and family members who evacuate must be placed on evacuation orders issued by their parent command. For Navy Installations Command personnel and families, the safe haven is within 300 miles of Atlanta. For personnel and family members assigned to other commands, they should proceed to their command’s designated safe haven. Personnel and families will be reimbursed for lodging and per diem at the approved rate for their designated safe haven.U.S. Fleet Forces, Navy Installations Command and Navy Region Southeast are providing support to the installations. Personnel and family members should check installation and Navy Region Southeast social media and websites and stay tuned to local radio and television stations for updates and additional information. “Please keep safety in mind when traveling to your safe haven,” Bolivar said. “The interstate highway and other roads will be congested with other Florida residents moving away from the storm. Be patient, follow the directions of local law enforcement officials and remember to muster when you reach safe haven.”All Navy personnel are encouraged to update emergency contact information through the NFAAS, which can be accessed at www.navyfamily.navy.mil, or through the NFAAS smartphone app available for both iOS or Android. If personnel need support, they can complete a needs assessment through the site or the app on their smartphone and a Navy counselor will make contact to provide assistance.Emergency Family Assistance Centers will open after storm passage. Personnel and family members are encouraged to check Facebook pages for their installation or Navy Region Southeast for the latest information and updates.last_img read more

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Surfers, Community Show Heart, Raise $3,000 to Benefit Autism

first_imgThe Heart of Surfing event, held Saturday afternoon on the 7th St Beach, was the most successful yet both in participation, and fundraising to aid children with autism.The event, now in its third year, included a conventional surfing contest and surfing sessions for special needs individuals. Volunteers assisted the special needs participants in catching waves, standing on the boards, and sometimes riding tandem.2016 HOS Event Organizers from left – Dennis Siteman, Cindy Fertsch, Bob FertschAccording to event co-founder and organizer Cindy Fertsch. The Heart of Surfing attracted more than 25 surfers with special needs, (double last year’s number) and raised approximately $3,000 which is also double the amount of last year.Ron Curcio with Heart of Surfing Student“The event has grown and the reason is the generosity of our surfing community and our sponsors, said Fertsch.She and husband Bob founded the event after seeing the positive impact surfing has on their autistic son, Jamie. They founded Heart of Surfing, which also uses skateboarding as “therapy” for the challenged individuals.Volunteers Paul and Ron helping outEach participant received a special pendant in the shape of a puzzle piece, the symbol of autism research.“This year we had a wide range of special needs participants and we had a beautiful day out here,” Fertsch said.The three major surf shops in town, Heritage, 7th St. Surf Shop and Surfers Supplies played a major role, donating the use of surfboards, wetsuits and other needed equipment, organizers said.Other businesses in town donated food, coffee, pizza, prizes and a variety of goods and services. The contest was run by a local Ocean City-based surfing club, No Passports Needed, or NPN, which also provided some of the volunteers. NPN member Willie Fannon, who is also founder of Ocean City NJ Surf School worked the microphone for the contest as emcee.Other sponsors included Ocean City NJ Surf School, Ocean City Surf Café, Brian Wynn Surfboards, Grace and Glory Yoga, Glazed Over, Copiers Plus, Noble Food Services, Dunkin Donuts, Romanelli’s restaurant, Shore Local Newsmagazine, Ward’s Pastries, Beau Ridge Photography, Joe 3 Photography, Red’s Jersey Mexico Café, and Think Ink Screen Printing.Click here to see a 1 minute video of the event2016 Heart of Surfing Surf Contest Results:Groms: (13 and Under)Cruz DinofaEthan DunnSophie WhelanOpen Shortboard:Andrew MangelWillie FannonCharlie BowmanWomens:Caroline BowmanSophie WhelanJen DomsicOpen Longboard:Andrew MangelCaroline BowmanCharlie BowmanFor more information, check out the Heart of Surfing Facebook page. 2016 HOS group photo – Group photo after contestlast_img read more

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Turkle talks technology, intimacy

first_img“Technology proposes itself an architect of our intimacies,” explained Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Sherry Turkle to an engrossed audience at the Harvard University Extension School. The event, “The Tethered Life: Technology Reshapes Intimacy and Solitude,” was the concluding public event of the School’s yearlong centennial celebration.“As we instant message, e-mail, text, and Twitter, technology redraws the boundaries between intimacy and solitude,” she said. “Teenagers avoid the telephone, fearful that it reveals too much. Besides, it takes too long; they would rather text than talk. Adults, too, choose keyboards over the human voice.”Tethered to technology, we are shaken when the unplugged world does not signify or satisfy. “After an evening of avatar-to-avatar talk in a networked game, we feel — at one moment — in possession of a full social life, and in the next, curiously isolated in tenuous complicity with strangers.”In this thought-provoking lecture, Turkle, who is founder and director of the MIT Initiative on Technology and Self, shared her observations on the significant impact technology has had on our personal lives — on our children, our families, and our notions of privacy, and how it has offered us less than positive substitutes for direct face-to-face connection with people in a world of machine-mediated relationships on networked devices.The May 14 lecture was based on Turkle’s new book, “Alone Together: Technology and the Reinvention of Intimacy and Solitude,” due for release by Basic Books in January 2011.last_img read more

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Mallika Kaur awarded Frederick Sheldon Traveling Fellowship

first_imgThe Harvard Committee on General Scholarships has awarded Mallika Kaur, M.P.P. ’10, the 2010-11 Frederick Sheldon Traveling Fellowship. The competitive fellowship is awarded to one Harvard graduate. First nominated by Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) for this award, Kaur was then selected by the fellowship committee from a pool of applicants from Harvard’s various graduate Schools.Kaur’s research focuses on South Asian human rights and security issues. Her perspectives have been informed by growing up in Punjab and having worked on advocacy efforts in the United States since 2001. The Sheldon Fellowship will support Kaur’s travel, study, and writing on gender issues in Indian-administered Kashmir.Kaur holds a master in public policy degree from HKS and a J.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. She helped co-found and currently serves as the coordinator of the Kashmir Initiative at Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights Policy.last_img read more

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Pro-life faculty launch national group chapter

first_imgUniversity Faculty for Life (UFL), a national organization, approved a chapter on Notre Dame’s campus this fall, the University announced last week. Notre Dame faculty and staff can now join the newly-formed group to engage in academic conversation about pro-life issues. Fr. Wilson D. Miscamble will serve as the president of the Notre Dame chapter, and Daniel Philpott, a political science professor, will serve as vice president. Miscamble said the group would give faculty the opportunity to participate in moral issues and affirm the right to life at all stages. The national organization of UFL was founded in 1989 to promote research and dialogue among faculty and staff who “respect the value of human life from its inception to natural death,” according to a University press release. “Our goal is to foster research and put forth a pro-life position to educate the community about life issues,” Miscamble said. Notre Dame will host the national conference for UFL on campus in June 2011, Miscamble said. “For this particular year I see it as a year of getting the chapter firmly established,” Miscamble said. “We will focus on meeting on a regular basis and doing the preparatory work for holding the UFL national conference.” Miscamble said the UFL chapter at Notre Dame would work on spiritual, academic and social levels. Members will support each other through prayer, invite speakers and academic discussion on life questions and host events that bring the members together to talk about issues related to their pro-life stance. “Many of us have been individual members of the national organization for some time,” Miscamble said. “What this marks is an effort for us to collaborate on campus.” The Notre Dame UFL chapter currently includes 25 formal members, Miscamble said. “One of my major objectives for the year is to increase membership,” Miscamble said. “This organization is multidisciplinary so we can bring faculty together from multiple colleges.” Miscamble currently serves as the chaplain for Notre Dame Right to Life, the student pro-life group on campus. He said events between the faculty and student pro-life groups will hopefully bring even more visibility to the pro-life cause at Notre Dame. “I think students will gain encouragement and support for their own efforts when they see that their faculty who might be a little bit older are still deeply committed to this cause,” Miscamble said. “What I see occurring is indeed a close and cooperative relationship between the University Faculty for Life and the Notre Dame Right to Life, the student organization involved in the pro-life cause,” Miscamble said. Political science professor Daniel Philpott joined UFL in July 2010 and will serve as the vice president of the Notre Dame UFL chapter. He said his work with the Human Rights Defense Fund moved him to work for human dignity and the protection of the unborn. “Notre Dame is a university that has a strong commitment to teaching social justice in the classroom,” Philpott said. “And the killing of the unborn is the largest human rights violation in the world today.” The UFL defends the right to life from conception to natural death and particularly works on the issues of abortion, infanticide and euthanasia, Philpott said. “As scholars, we share a very strong commitment to reasoning and to cool, careful thought in dialogue,” Philpott said. “This is the spirit in which we are proceeding on an issue that can be polarizing and rancorous in national conversation.” Other faculty members serving in the Notre Dame UFL chapter include Program of Liberal Studies professor Walter Nicgorski as secretary-treasurer. Engineering professor Craig Lent and Elizabeth Kirk, associate director of the Center for Ethics and Culture, will serve as members of the chapter’s executive board. UFL membership also includes non-Catholic institutions and faculty members, but Philpott said Notre Dame, as a Catholic university, naturally fit into the organization. “The UFL itself does not have a religious affiliation,” Philpott said. “But obviously there is a very close resonance with the mission of a Catholic university and protecting the right to life.”last_img read more

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‘Forages 2001.’

first_imgGeorgia farmers raise livestock in every county in the state, and providing forages for all those animals isn’t easy. University of Georgia scientists and other experts will provide a wealth of information on the topic in “Forages 2001,” a two-day workshop in Tifton, Ga., May 22-23.The workshop will begin with an 8 a.m. country breakfast. The opening morning’s sessions will cover perennial and annual grasses and legumes and where they fit in a forage plan.Other sessions will cover poisonous plants, weed identification and forage testing and quality. Participants will learn how to interpret a quality analysis from any lab and make recommendations.County Agent CompetitionThe afternoon will end with a field tour from 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. After supper and entertainment, the evening will end with a roundtable competition of county agent presentations on successful forage programs.Wednesday morning will open with a country breakfast at 7 a.m. Sessions on pasture ecology, starting at 8 a.m., will cover management impacts on water quality and regulations on solid waste application.The workshop will end with sessions on forages for wildlife nutrition, plantings and practices.CCA, Pesticide CreditsParticipants will be eligible for 9.5 Certified Crop Advisor credits. Pesticide License Recertification credits have been applied for in Georgia, Alabama and Florida.A $10 registration fee covers the workshop costs. An optional golf tournament fee is $30. The deadline to register is May 14. For more information or a registration form, call the Tifton conference office at (229) 386-3416.Rooms have been blocked at the Holiday Inn for $45 plus 12-percent tax. (To get this rate, mention “Forages 2001.”)last_img read more

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Dominican Republic Receives Interceptor Patrol Boat

first_imgBy Yubelin Mariel Suero/Diálogo November 14, 2016 The Dominican Republic Navy received a donated 37’ Boston Whaler interceptor patrol boat, which includes equipment and spare parts, as part of the cooperation agreements between the Dominican Republic’s Armed Forces and the U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM). U.S. Ambassador James W. Brewster and Vice Admiral Miguel Enrique Peña Acosta, commander of the Dominican Republic Navy, were present at the delivery ceremony, held at the “27 de febrero” Naval Base, in Santo Domingo, on September 30th. As part of the agreement between the two partner nations, 11 patrol boats have already been delivered. They are among the key tools used for maritime interdiction operations. “From the moment the first patrol boats arrived in March of 2009, I was able to see for myself the quality of these wonderful vessels, designed to operate in the rough waters of the Caribbean,” Vice Adm. Peña Acosta told Diálogo. “They are outfitted with high-tech gear that enables us to use them in a variety of atmospheric conditions to support search and rescue operations, to conduct interdictions of piracy or illegal migration, and to aid in humanitarian relief operations, as we did when the latest earthquake struck Haiti and also during Hurricane Matthew,” he added. With this unit, the Dominican Navy has substantially increased its effectiveness in pursuing criminals, as well as having gained greater range for the maritime missions it conducts in its strategic alliance with the Dominican Republic’s Drug Enforcement Agency (DNCD, per its Spanish acronym). The patrol boats are being used in different regions of the country, specifically at Cabo Rojo, Barahona, Las Calderas and Punta Cana. “From August 2014 to now, we have seized more than 10 tons of drugs, thanks to this equipment,” emphasized Vice Adm. Peña Acosta. “As commandant of the Dominican Navy, I can tell you that these 37-foot Boston Whaler interceptor patrol boats have been a huge benefit to our naval operations, as they are ‘the tip of the spear’ in the fight against drug trafficking, terrorism, and illegal activities that occur in our area of responsibility. Now we can respond in a matter of minutes, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, to the daily events that happen in our nation’s territorial waters.” The Dominican Navy is hoping to use the equipment to close down the Caribbean region for organized crime. Specific missions Speaking about this delivery, U.S. Navy Lieutenant Commander Chris Bernotavicius, chief of the Naval Section at the Office of the Security Cooperation of the U.S. Embassy in Dominican Republic, expressed his satisfaction with the decisive way in which both countries have channeled their energies into such bilateral exchanges, having already enjoyed decades of cooperation in different programs, activities and exercises. “We’ve really seen a dynamic evolution over time. Now we have programs in place to provide training to different branches of the Armed Forces, with equipment for increasing our forces’ operational capacity, and plenty of forums for sharing the lessons learned,” he said. “Due to the nature of the Dominican Republic as an island, it is highly strategic for cooperating in maritime interdiction operations, not only in fighting drug trafficking, but also for search and rescue missions, aid to fishermen, and the interdiction of illegal voyages; above all, those made towards Puerto Rico,” stated Lt. Cmdr. Bernotavicius. Ongoing struggle The Dominican Navy regularly cooperates with the DNCD, the U.S. Coast Guard’s Seventh District, the Joint Interagency Task Force – South, and the U.S. Southern Command. Vice Admiral Edmundo Félix Pimentel, president of DNCD in the Dominican Republic, reported that in the last four years approximately 56,000 kilograms of drugs were seized and 118,000 people were arrested for the possession of illegal substances, thanks to the Dominican Navy’s interventions using the interceptor patrol boats. “It is because of these joint operations that, in 2015 alone, we conducted nearly 2,500 raids and some 70,000 operations on land, air, and sea. Among the drugs seized during that year, there were nearly 9,000 kilograms of cocaine, more than 1,000 kilos of marijuana, and 44 kilos of heroin,” he added. “On January 25th, with the collaboration of other security agencies in the country, the DNCD found 150 packages of cocaine and heroin inside a shipping container at Multimodal Caucedo Port. In another operation, 575 packages of cocaine were seized off the shores of Cumayasa, in San Pedro de Macorís, in a joint operation between the Navy, the DEA and the DNCD. That is to say that, in 2016 to date, we estimate that around 3,000 kilos of illegal substances have been seized,” said Vice Adm. Pimentel. “We have instructed all of the members of the drug-enforcement body to redouble their operations against drug trafficking and organized crime.” He also acknowledged the commitment that all of their members have made to “working with the Ministry of Defense, the National Police and other agencies to fight the illicit trafficking of narcotic substances with resolve and determination while also respecting human rights and the dignity of all persons.” Lt. Cmdr. Bernotavicius told Diálogo that each year the “U.S. donates more than $2 million in equipment and materials to the Dominican Republic through the drug-fighting program. The U.S. also collaborates on even larger-scale efforts, such as the construction of a pier and an operations center for this Caribbean nation’s Navy on Isla Saona. Funds are also made available to the Dominican Republic for facilitating training, setting up exchange forums, and building multilateral and regional relationships. In addition, an unquantifiable amount of human capital is devoted to these projects by the personnel of the agencies involved.”last_img read more

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Onsite: Embracing change at the 2015 Carolinas Credit Union League Annual Meeting

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Details There seems to be a common theme at the 2015 Carolinas Credit Union League Annual Meeting, and that theme is “change”.The morning kicked off with a quote from C.S. Lewis:“It may be hard for an egg to turn into a bird: it would be a jolly sight harder for a bird to learn to fly while remaining an egg. We are like eggs at present. And you cannot go on indefinitely being just an ordinary, decent egg. We must be hatched or go bad.”Speaking to credit union executives from North and South Carolina on Monday, CUNA President and CEO Jim Nussle laid out his vision for the future and what advocacy should look like for the credit union movement. A man who admits that “advocacy has been my life,” Nussle challenged that different times will require a different strategy. While many would look at the passing of a CUNA-backed bill as a success, Nussle believes that it does not mean much if we are not growing as an industry. In his words, “winning equals growing.”According to Nussle, one reason that many trade associations are struggling is that they get caught up worrying about themselves and not focusing on the people that they represent.  Advocacy is good for business and the power of advocacy lies in telling our members stories and focusing on results. Nussle’s focus going forward is to look at the value of that advocacy and what CUNA is providing for its members. He wants to remove barriers that prevent credit unions from providing for their members, create awareness to let the credit union message be known and to make sure that credit union service is excellent, by examining what credit unions do well and what needs to change.Nussle also said that it is important for credit unions to not overlook small victories, to get involved at events like Hike the Hill and GAC and to look no further than your members to help create change. There may only be 6,400 credit unions CEOs nationwide, but those CEOs represent 78 million credit union members, whose voice is a lot stronger.Earlier in the morning, Karen McCullough looked at the changing landscape of credit union membership, and millennials affect on credit unions.She said that millennials look a lot different than older members, but they are always connected and are getting smarter as a result. Business processes, social values, technology, sustainability and generational differences are also changing as a result of Gen Y. McCullough quoted The Profit’s  Marcus Lemonis as saying “Success is always a moving target.. Anyone who thinks that they have arrived is kidding themselves.  In order to succeed today you have to understand innovation, technology, the new customer and be open to change”One bit of advice that McCullough had for change was to not make it gradual. In order to not drag out the negativity of change, she encouraged credit unions to make changes soon and make them fast. Her formula for change is to relate, repeat, and reframe. By buying in to change, you will be open to learning, listening and trying new ideas. Make change something you want to do and then love it, own it and embrace it.last_img read more

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Auctions during the next two weeks will reveal whether recent price growth has spread

first_imgAuctioneer Haesley Cush predicts a busy couple of weeks for the auction market of bidding and sale rate that has me optimistic about the next couple of weeks.Over the next week and a half I’ll call auctions from entry level homes at Ipswich through to the hotly anticipated prestige sale of 579 Lower Bowen Terrace, New Farm. Last year the entry level market was hotter than a summer seatbelt, so its all eyes on the high end to see if the market has migrated north. Over the last few weeks we have seen the newspapers swell with prestige homes hitting the real estate lift outs around the country marketing upcoming auction events. When you see a wave of high end homes hit the market, you can safely assume those owners have done their research and they feel comfortable there is a pool of waiting buyers.In Brisbane specifically the $2 million plus market represents exceptional value when compared to our neighbours down the road in Sydney and Melbourne. This value and competition gives confidence to a market. These activities will give access to buyers to purchase these rarely available properties with the knowledge the market is currently in a solid position with other buyers supporting their decision to buy multi-million dollar property.• Haesley Cush is a Brisbane auctioneer. All eyes will be on the high end of the market in the next few weeks. This luxury home at579 Lower Bowen Tce, New Farm is one of those that will go under the hammer. Picture: Jack TranTHE next two weekends, Saturday the 25th February and March 4, are likely to be huge for auctions across the country.When you consider that auctions usually have a three to four week lead in and the vast majority of sellers wait until after Australia Day to list their property, it gives strong support to this prediction.And there will be a lot of interest in these results. It will give a good-sized market sample and the results will either spur on or cool the 2017 market.As I look at my calendar for the upcoming week there are currently 37 auctions locked in and the majority of those agents are reporting strong inspection numbers. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor8 hours agoI’ve called just under 15 auctions so far this month and all but two sold. While 15 is a small sample it’s the amountlast_img read more

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