Category: kfrjjrpom

Disturbing spate of physical attacks on journalists

first_img October 9, 2020 Find out more to go further RSF calls for the immediate release of Uzbek journalist RSF asks authorities, opposition to guarantee reporters’ safety during Kyrgyzstan protests Receive email alerts News RSF_en August 14, 2020 Find out more RSF is concerned about the fate of an Uzbek journalist extradited by Kyrgyzstan KyrgyzstanEurope – Central Asia Newscenter_img News Organisation KyrgyzstanEurope – Central Asia Help by sharing this information May 20, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Disturbing spate of physical attacks on journalists News Reporters Without Borders is alarmed by a new wave of threats and physical attacks on journalists during the past few weeks in both Bishkek, the capital, and the southern city of Osh.“Harassment and self-censorship are growing, in an explosive atmosphere of ethnic tension,” Reporters Without Borders said. “No serious investigation has been carried out into any of these attacks on journalists. We remind the authorities that they have a duty to ensure the safety of journalists and to put an end to the prevailing impunity.“Journalists were already the victims of a wave of violence and intimidation at the end of 2009, at a time of growing exasperation with former President Kurmanbek Bakiyev’s government. Even if the new central government is not behind these latest attacks, it is clearly failing in its duty to protect journalists and the civilian population in general.”Ever since the April 2010 uprising and the ensuing inter-ethnic violence between Uzbek and Kyrgyz communities in the south, political and social tension has continued and the state has been permanently weakened. Journalists who try to cover the current problems are increasingly being targeted, especially in Osh and other parts of the south, where hundreds of civilians died in June 2010.In one of the most recent cases, Reuters correspondent Hulkar Isamova was accosted and threatened in an Osh car park by two women armed with a knife, who accused her of being a “supporter of Kadyrjan Batyrov,” an Uzbek community leader wanted by the authorities. Disturbingly, the women had confidential information that Isamova had given to police who were investigating the June 2010 unrest.This act of intimidation came three days after more than a dozen people identifying themselves as supporters of the nationalist party Asaba burst into the offices of the 24.kg news agency in Osh and threatened its journalists and employees, using ethnic insults and calling them “Uzbek spies.”The list of abuses against journalists gets longer by the week amid general indifference and impunity. The police rarely take any action when complaints are filed. If investigations are opened, they are carried in a desultory fashion and produce no results.Jyldyz Bekbayeva, the correspondent of the Russian news agency Interfax, was the target of a particularly brutal attack by two men and two women as she was returning home with her two-year-old daughter on the evening of 1 May in Osh’s Zapadny neighbourhood, and had to be hospitalized with injuries to the head, neck and legs.Kyrgyz interim President Rosa Otunbayeva described the attack as a “press freedom violation” and pledged to follow the investigation closely. However Bekbayeva herself is a target of one of the two investigations launched after the attack.Meanwhile in Bishkek, Samat Asipov, a TV reporter who covers politics and social issues for Canal 5’s news programme Kundemi, had to be hospitalized after being attacked by three unidentified men near the city’s Technical University on 11 May.“Since the start of May, there have been three serious assaults on journalists in which the victims have had to be hospitalized,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Each of these attacks was probably linked to the victim’s work, because they were not robbed and because they all cover sensitive subjects.”Two other journalists – Elmira Toktogulova of Tazar and Media-Consult and Nazgul Kushnazarova of Radio Almaz – are known to have been physically attacked in Bishkek since the start of the year. In these two cases, it has not been possible to determine whether the victim’s work was the principle motive. In both cases, the investigation has ground to a halt.Journalists have also reportedly been targeted by traffickers in petroleum products in the remote southwestern border town of Batken. According to the Kyrgyz Centre for Human Rights, Ulan Makkambayev and Zhyrgal Aytmatov, who work for state-owned radio and TV broadcaster ElTR, were threatened with reprisals if they tried to do any more smuggling stories.The police and judicial investigations into the June 2010 violence have unfortunately proved to be one-sided. This has been seen in the conclusions of the investigation into two Uzbek media owners – Khalil Khudoyberdiyev (Osh TV’s former owner) and Javlon Mirzakhodjayev (the owner and CEO of the TV stations Mezon, Itogi Nedeli and Portfel) – which were published at the end of AprilThe two men, who are currently in exile, were investigated for covering an Uzbek community meeting in Jalal-Abad in May 2010. They learned from press reports that they are to be prosecuted on charges of organizing and participating in public disturbances, encouraging separatism, inciting sectarian and ethnic hatred, abuse of authority and illegally creating an armed group. Khudoyberdiyev had to sell Osh TV in July 2010 after receiving threats.The events of June 2010 and the continuing inter-ethnic tension receive little coverage in the Kyrgyz media. Inga Sikorskaya of the Institute for War and Peace Reporting said: “A journalist writing about the effects of ethnic violence is exposed to many problems. As a result, self-censorship develops.”Picture : Hulkar Isamova August 26, 2020 Find out more Follow the news on Kyrgyzstanlast_img read more

Continue Reading

Consumers More Likely to Choose Non-Mortgage Debt Over Mortgages

first_img Related Articles  Print This Post Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Kerri Panchuk is an attorney and financial writer with more than a decade of experience covering real estate, default servicing, residential mortgage-backed securities, retail, macroeconomics, and commercial real estate. Panchuk graduated from the Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law and texas Tech University, Panchuk previously served DSNews.com as online managing editor/producer and webcast anchor. In April, she rejoined the Fiver Star Institute as executive director of member groups, overseeing the development and growth of the National Appraisal Congress and Title and Closing Coalition. Panchuk is a member of the State Bar of Texas. Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago An active mortgage market is the byproduct of consumers citing homeownership as a need–or an inescapable debt that is a natural appendage to a person’s credit history.Unfortunately, a new article from Credit.com suggests that when given a choice between different types of debt, fewer consumers take out home mortgages and are much more likely to carry other kinds of debt alone, with credit cards ranking as the most common.The article shatters the ongoing myth that mortgages are an average part of consumer life. Unfortunately, the data compiled by the Urban Institute says there are six kinds of borrowers: those who have mortgage debt only, those who have credit card debt only, those who have no debt, those who have an auto loan and a mortgage and those who have student loan debt only and those who have an auto loan.Surprisingly, credit card debt is the only debt for 22 percent of consumers. Meanwhile, the percentage of consumers with only a mortgage came in at 13 percent out of 5 million Americans studied.The most common type of consumer–making up 29 percent of the analyzed pool of consumers–have no debt at all, suggesting Americans are much more risk-adverse than previously known and remain so in the wake of the mortgage market meltdown.The takeaway for lenders: Consumers are definitely debt cautious, and it seems big ticket items lose out to smaller debts such as credit cards when borrowers decide to carry only one type of debt.For roughly 4 percent of borrowers, student loan debt is the only debt they reported. However, the report does note that it’s likely many borrowers carry more than one type of debt, especially if they have a mortgage since they need to establish some type of credit history before qualifying for a home loan. Consumer Credit Mortgage Debt non-mortgage debt 2015-11-26 Brian Honea The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Previous: Ocwen Re-Initiates Stock Repurchase Program Next: Building Better Relationships Consumers More Likely to Choose Non-Mortgage Debt Over Mortgages Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Home / Featured / Consumers More Likely to Choose Non-Mortgage Debt Over Mortgages in Featured, Market Studies, Newscenter_img Subscribe Tagged with: Consumer Credit Mortgage Debt non-mortgage debt November 26, 2015 993 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago About Author: Kerri Panchuk Share Save The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Is Rise in Forbearance Volume Cause for Concern? 2 days agolast_img read more

Continue Reading

Existing Pramerica jobs secured with major buyout by Indian Company

first_img Facebook Twitter Pinterest By News Highland – November 12, 2020 Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme WhatsApp The ownership of Pramerica is changing hands with assurances given that all jobs are to be retained.India’s Tata Consultancy has agreed to acquire Pramerica from insurance giant Prudential Financial Inc.Prudential Financial Inc. will retain the Pramerica Ireland brand, which will continue to operate in Letterkenny.No cash will change hands and TCS will take on more than 1,500 Pramerica employees.Donegal Deputy Joe McHugh says the management team were keen to reassure workers that all jobs are secure:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/joemchughpramerica.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Twitter Pinterest Previous articleWarning over future of small rural schoolsNext articleDonegal GP warns against ‘Covid conspiracy theories’ News Highland Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Ciaran Harvey is Senior Managing Director with Pramerica Ireland:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/harveyweb.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Existing Pramerica jobs secured with major buyout by Indian Companylast_img read more

Continue Reading

Hurricane Michael evacuee spots trapped uncle’s H-E-L-P message on NOAA satellite map

first_imgNOAA(CALLAWAY, Fla.) — As hundreds of rescuers combed the Florida Panhandle for missing people in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael, Amber Gee found her uncle and aunt when she used a government interactive satellite map and spotted their H-E-L-P message on the family’s front lawn.Gee, a mother of a 2-year-old girl and 3-month-old boy, evacuated her home in Callaway, Florida, just south of hard-hit Panama City on Thursday, a day after the category 4 storm made landfall. She assumed her relatives followed suit.But on Saturday, she was searching the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration interactive satellite map and to her astonishment saw the word H-E-L-P spelled out in logs on her grandmother’s lawn in Youngstown, northeast of Panama City.Her uncle, Ernest Gee, had used trees knocked down by the hurricane to cobble together the S.O.S., she told ABC News on Sunday.“I was checking on damages in the area on houses that belong to my family and I came across my grandma’s house,” said Gee, 24. “And they had the word H-E-L-P written out in the yard.”While her grandmother, Emily Bently, who is in her 80s, had already evacuated, her uncle, Ernest, his wife and a friend of theirs stayed behind and ended up trapped, she said.“I had been seeing this link to images all over Facebook and I decided to check it out,” Gee said. “We lucked out and I was able to get some of my family some help and get them out of the property.“I didn’t think it was really going to work. … But luckily enough, my uncle who was staying there and was thinking outside of the box, wrote the word H-E-L-P out.”After seeing the distress signal, Gee posted the image of the H-E-L-P message on the Bay County site and called her local emergency services officials and asked for a welfare check.(MORE: Hurricane Michael updates: Death toll rises to 17 as ‘tremendous number’ unaccounted for in hard-hit Florida)A team from the Dade County Sheriff’s Department made it to the house about 2 a.m. on Sunday and rescued her family members and their friend.“Apparently, they had to cut through a lot of downed trees to get there,” Gee said.Gee said she was relieved to hear her relatives were safe.“The hurricane has turned everything upside down everywhere,” she said. “Some were more fortunate than others. I’m just happy that everybody is safe and sound and, hopefully, soon we will all get through this together and recover from this storm.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Resource Guide: Travel health

first_imgWith the globalisation of business taking staff further a field in their jobs,travel health has become a growing area of work for OH advisors.  Our resource guide provides some usefulinformation sourcesCentre for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/travelA US site providing extensive detail on health risks and up-to-dateinformation on epidemics worldwide. Foreign and Commonwealth Office 1 Palace Street London SWIE SHE Tel: 0207-238 4503/4504 Fax: 0207-238 4545 Invaluable source of travel advice, news and country-specific information.An essential source of information for anyone planning to visit risk areas ofthe world. International Society of Travel Medicine www.istm.orgE-mail: [email protected] Advisory Service for Travellers Abroad www.masta.org Set up in 1984 at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, thisis an excellent web site offering a wealth of detail on vaccinations, stayinghealthy overseas, disease descriptions, advice for travellers with specialneeds, travel products to purchase on-line and helpful links. Medical College of Wisconsin Physicians and Clinics www.healthlink.mcw.edu/travel-medicineWeb site providing information about all aspects of travel health. The Malaria Foundation www.pol-it.org//malaria.htmUp-to-date opinions and news on the prevention and treatment of malaria. Travel Health Online www.tripprep.comE-mail: [email protected] data for travellers to 220 countries, from Afghanistan to Zimbabwe. Travel Health Distance Learning Programme Tel: 01322 427216 A flexible programme designed for primary care and written by experts in travelhealth It provides information on health education and disease prevention, theenvironment and special groups of travellers, immunisation and prophylaxis andmanaging a travel health service. World Health Organisation www.who.int Extremely thorough site, giving an exhaustive guide to all aspects of travelhealth, including tropical diseases, vaccine-preventable diseases and healthtechnology. It includes the Disease Outbreak Register which offers the latestinformation about disease outbreaks the world over. www.highwaytohealth.comAccessible American site which provides destination specific information onall the world’s most popular destinations. It lists emergency contact numbers,local hospitals and medical clinics and embassy details in all major towns andcities. www.lonelyplanet.comStraightforward web site produced by travel guide publisher Lonely Planet.It offers advice on pre-departure health planning and keeping healthy whileabroad – including information on water and food preparation, women’s healthand tips on how to cope with motion sickness, cuts, bites and stings. It alsoprovides useful links to other travel health-related sites as well asinformation about tourist offices and embassy and visa details. www.travelclinic.com.auAn Australian site offering helpful tips on staying healthy abroad,including food to avoid, coping with jet-lag, and avoiding an stomach upsets. www.travelhealth.comIncludes risk assessment by destination, up-to-date vaccine news and generaltravel health information. The listing above is not exhaustive and the journal welcomes furtheradditions from readers as well as suggestions for further topics of interest toinclude in this series Previous Article Next Article Resource Guide: Travel healthOn 1 Mar 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Continue Reading

North End Neighborhood Drainage Project Update

first_imgLooking north, drainage construction continues on Bay Avenue near Third Street.  Work to be completed in the week of Dec. 31 to Jan. 4:Contractor Feriozzi Concrete will continue construction on the east side of Bay Avenue, working between Second Street and Fourth Street. Pipe crews will install a 15-inch force main on Fifth Street from Bay Avenue to the bulkhead. A second crew will continue the installation of the pump station at Sixth Street and Bay. Another contractor, Arthur Henry, will continue the installation of the bulkhead at Third Street. Project Design:See Design Presentation for Detaillast_img

Continue Reading

Soccer’s versatile beauty

first_imgA few years ago, two Harvard humanities professors created one ingenious class.“The Global Game: Soccer, Politics, and Popular Culture,” or “Romance Studies 109,” isn’t simply about admiring the world’s most popular sport — it’s also a window onto some of the most pressing questions posed by the humanities.“The point is to use soccer as a portal, as an entryway into the disciplines but also the questions that the humanities propose about the production of social meaning,” said Mariano Siskind, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities and a scholar of 19th- and 20th-century Latin American literature. “What is beauty, and why is it called the beautiful game? That’s a central question in aesthetic philosophy.“We need to shake students up,” he added, “in the way that Russian formalist Viktor Shklovsky asked them to ‘defamiliarize’ the objects they take for granted.”The course’s co-creator, Francesco Erspamer, is a professor of Romance languages and literatures, and, like Siskind, a lifelong soccer fan.If students lack a foundation in critical analysis, “when they become leaders or prominent people they will just be repeating or simply adhering to situations instead of being innovative change-makers,” Erspamer said. “This space is where you learn to be courageous, to go beyond yourself, to take some intellectual risks.”The class grew out a friendship between the professors that began on the soccer field during weekly games and deepened over frank conversations about the challenges facing the humanities. In the last decade, colleges and universities across the United States have struggled to attract students to arts and humanities concentrations, with more undergrads gravitating toward STEM fields: science, technology, engineering, and math.To help to reverse the trend, Harvard administrators in 2013 released a trio of detailed reports on the humanities that recommended new College offerings, including humanities framework courses, now part of the curriculum, that focus on three areas of learning: the art of listening, the art of reading, and the art of looking.Siskind and Erspamer’s one-semester class debuted in spring 2012, but anticipated the reports’ findings in the belief that the study of the humanities hones critical thinking, analysis, and interpretation.Harvard administrators were thrilled with the new offering. Students were thrilled, too. The professors had to switch classrooms twice to accommodate the more than 100 students who signed up.One look at the syllabus dispels any notion that “The Global Game” is merely a chance to argue about whether Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo is the best player in the world. Class participation is key, as are weekly response papers to the hefty assigned readings, and a midterm and final exam. Course materials are not in the least restricted to sport, instead leaping from the French philosopher Michel Foucault to the cultural anthropologist Richard Shweder to the Russian literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin.“They are key texts of humanities inquiry about the production of space and subjectivity, about aesthetic philosophy, about history or popular culture in the Middle Ages,” Siskind said.Class discussions are just as wide-ranging and demanding. One recent conversation explored how different cultures relate to soccer, including the ways fans in certain countries mock or insult players.“Should we change significant cultural practices in one place because audiences are watching it from another part in the world and are offended by it? Some said yes,” said Erspamer. The ensuing discussion, he added, “Turned into a debate over the ethics of representation in the context of global cultural difference.”In another session, students examined how contemporary celebrity culture elevates elite athletes to cult-like status and the ways fans often project their own fears and aspirations onto stars.“That’s the surface of a phenomenon that is much larger and deeper,” and dates to the Greek notion of the tragic hero, said Siskind. “We use Sophocles’ tragedies and several concepts from Aristotle’s ‘Poetics,’ with special emphasis on the idea of ‘catharsis,’ and try to make sense of the rise and fall of Diego Maradona, one of the best players in the history of the game, famous for his exploits and scandals on and off the pitch.”Like many of his classmates, James Clarke ’16 brought a soccer-centric mind-set to the first gathering. “To be totally honest, the idea of taking a class from professors who mix business and pleasure really made me smile,” said Clarke, a government concentrator and soccer fan. But examining challenging coursework through a new lens has helped him grapple with important questions about the human experience, he said. “It’s a really fascinating course.”No less so for Zoe Kessler ’17, whose passion for the game, a product in part of playing competitively in high school, has gained “even more meaning” through the course’s engagement with timeless questions linked to the humanities.The class has included visits by special guests. On a recent Wednesday afternoon, students jammed Fong Auditorium to hear from former U.S. men’s soccer star Landon Donovan, who discussed how cultural attitudes differ from country to country, as well as soccer’s struggle to gain a professional foothold in America.But the question that resonated most in the room of high-achieving students had to do with disappointment: What was it like to be cut from the national team just weeks before the 2014 World Cup?Fittingly, Donovan’s answer touched on a topic many argue the arts and humanities are perfectly suited to engage: compassion.“It was the first time in my life that I had not made a team, that I had not been chosen,” he said. “I finally had compassion for people that didn’t get everything all the time and that is much, much, much more valuable than having gone to Brazil and playing in a World Cup.” He got a round of applause.Fun is part of the curriculum, too. At the end of each class, Erspamer and Siskind bring students to the Cesarini zone, named for the Argentine-Italian soccer player from the 1930s famous for scoring miraculous goals in the waning minutes of matches. “It’s a quirky moment in the class, we have fun thinking about the game in a more relaxed, loose, fun way,” said Erspamer.Lessons from the day’s lecture invariably work their way in. One recent Cesarini zone followed a class discussion about dictatorship and democracy and how soccer can be co-opted by politics. The professors asked students to weigh in on whether World Cup wins should be considered legitimate if the country that took home the trophy did so under dubious political circumstances. A spirited debate ensued.An upcoming end-of-class conversation will tackle how goal celebrations have risen to an individual art form, buoyed by mass media and the selfie generation.Erspamer and Siskind realize that they may not win many converts to the humanities with “The Global Game,” but they are convinced they have planted an important seed of intellectual inquiry.“It’s a way of learning to see a certain complexity that is directly related to art and to philosophy and to discourse and narrative,” said Erspamer. “And it’s learning to see things that are familiar and therefore invisible.”And sometimes, he said, an encounter with grace and beauty is the payoff. The first five minutes of the first class began with a video clip of the former French superstar Zinedine Zidane faking out his opponents with balletic ease. The clip ended with a quote from the German philosopher Immanuel Kant. (“Everyone has his own taste,” it begins. “But the beautiful stands on quite a different footing.”)“The idea is that you see that Zidane doing tricks even when he doesn’t need to do a trick,” said Erspamer. “It’s not to show off. It’s simply because he is trying something.”He added, “Art is the space where you try new things; experimentation is central to aesthetics and the humanities. Just like the most compelling artists, great soccer players push the boundaries of what’s known.”last_img read more

Continue Reading

French Holocaust memorial vandalized on remembrance day

first_imgPARIS (AP) — Vandals painted pro-Uighur graffiti on France’s Holocaust Memorial ahead of international commemorations of the Nazi slaughter of millions of Jews. The Israeli Embassy in France tweeted a photo of the graffiti scrawled on a wall etched with the names of tens of thousands of French victims of the Holocaust. The embassy expressed “horror and anger” at the vandalism “on such a symbolic day.” Paris police said the graffiti was discovered Wednesday morning, as ceremonies were being held or planned around the world to mark International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The graffiti was not expressly anti-Semitic but apparently sought to call attention to China’s treatment of Muslim Uighurs.last_img

Continue Reading

Town hall invites discussion on ‘China policy’

first_imgThe student worker participation committee (SWPC) hosted a town hall discussion on the “China Policy” Wednesday night in Geddes Hall. Rosie LoVoi | The Observer The student worker participation committee (SWPC) hosted a town hall Wednesday night in Geddes Hall to discuss the ‘China policy’ and the ‘Freedom of Association’ policy.Since 2001, the “Freedom of Association” policy has identified 11 countries, including China, as being ineligible for the production of University merchandise. The Worker Participation Committee (WPC) wrote a “Review of the Freedom of Association Policy,” in May 2015, which provided recommendations for assessing factories in China and other countries regarding worker participation. One of the recommendations was to form a student subcommittee to the WPC, the SWPC. “There was a call to bring students more intentionally to the table and so we followed up that recommendation by submitting a letter to Dr. Affleck-Graves in December 2015,” Matt Caponigro, secretary of the SWPC, said. “There were eight students who were particularly passionate about the issue, all kind of knew each other and we got together and offered to Dr. Affleck-Graves that we would volunteer ourselves to be on the committee, at least long enough to get a committee formed.”Caponigro said that in order to best represent the student body, students from a variety of fields and organizations — both undergraduate and graduate — sit on the committee. “We wanted to represent all of the student issues or all of the student groups we thought would be interested in this topic,” he said. “So we found people from the business school, we found people who were interested in coming at it from more of a human rights perspective. We were looking for people who were really going to be looking at this from a labor perspective. We also recognized that, despite identifying all of these student clubs around campus, we might still be missing some people, so we created a couple of seats we’re calling ‘open academic positions.’”  Three representatives from the SWPC also sit on the WPC, which is otherwise comprised of faculty and staff.“Ideally what we’re going to do at the end of the day is, as students, pool our resources, pool our experiences from all of these different perspectives into an informed perspective that our three reps will bring to inform the Worker Participation Committee in their meetings as equal partners at the table,” Caponigro said. “The other sort of mission is to bring so much more diversity and experience and background and thought to the process. It’s one thing to have fifteen well-experienced administrators and faculty at the table, but you double in size when you bring in these students.”While the town hall discussion was focused on addressing factories in China and other countries the University works with, Caponigro said he and the other representatives from the WPC and SWPC in attendance would not be naming any of these countries. “One of the things we’re going to be careful about tonight is that to honor our working relationship with the licensees, we will not list any of the licensees by name,” he said. “We will not mention any brand names; we will not mention the names of any of the factories that we’re talking about tonight. That’s something we’ve agreed to do, sort of in good faith with our licensee partners.” “The question is whether or not to allow manufacturing in China,” Caponigro said. “That’s a simple way of saying it; really, it’s many questions: how important are our international labor laws and statutes to inform the way that countries approach the rights and freedoms of their workers? How important is Catholic Social Teaching to informing the way we think about workers? How important is human development and the ability to do good by some people who haven’t had a lot of good done by them, even if it’s at the cost of some of the more principled ways of approaching the effort?”Hannah O’Brien, one of the SWPC’s representatives for the WPC, was part of a group that went to Guatemala and El Salvador to assess factories the University was already utilizing. “This pilot program focuses on China, but we did assessments in other countries as well: Guatemala, El Salvador, India and Bangladesh, where we’d already been manufacturing,” she said. “We were making these standards for China but we wanted to make sure these other places were also meeting these standards we’re trying to enforce. In some cases, they weren’t. In fact, in some of these factories, the conditions were worse than they were in the factories in China.”  According to O’Brien, the factories were being assessed on freedom of association and worker participation. “Freedom of association and worker participation are not the same thing,” she said. “Freedom of association, in the broad sense, is ‘is it legal in this country for unions to be formed in any sector.’ Worker participation is not very different, but different in that unionization doesn’t have to be legal, but the goal is to see to what extent can we get the workers involved with the management and have a say in how things are run without necessarily forming a union.”The difference between the two, O’Brien said, was clear in some of the factories they assessed in Guatemala and El Salvador. “Unionization is legal in these countries, but it’s frowned upon,” she said. “Whereas worker participation, on the other hand, was in a lot of factories that we saw; they already had a strong system or they were making strides toward that.” Dan Graff, director of the Higgins Labor Program said that while China technically has one union, it doesn’t function the way American unions do.“The Chinese unions are attached to the communist party,” he said. “They’re attached to the state and there’s no ability to make any independent, legal entities outside of that framework.”Caponigro said that while the Chinese unions exist, they don’t have high worker participation. “Unions in the United States are voted to be in existence by the voters in a particular factory or from a particular employer, whereas unions in China, which are institutionalized with the business,” he said. “It’s mandatory for there to be a chapter but the question is whether or not workers are participating in the union.” Several of the participants asked the WPC and SWPC members in attendance why China, in particular, was garnering so much attention and effort from the University.“There seems to be a push for better relations with China and this is a part of that,” O’Brien said. “We already buy so many products from China, but we refuse to manufacture there. Why don’t we reevaluate that policy and see if we can get workers involved and manufacture and improve the lives of workers and do that in a way that’s actually impactful rather than just saying ‘oh, well on moral grounds, we’re not going to do this at all.’ But, effectively, we’re still not doing anything because we buy all those other products from them. It’s kind of a double standard in my opinion.”Mike Lowe, director of licensing, said the University was, above all, trying to make a difference and the “Freedom of Association” policy, in regards to China, was not accomplishing that. “Ideally, when Notre Dame initiated the policy in 2001, I think the inherent hope was that other universities would see this as a policy that they would adopt and, over the years, not a single other university has adopted the policy,” he said. “We have this policy that’s very strong and very moral but it didn’t make a difference. So the question is, if we engage with our licensees in production in factories they’re currently working in, are we better able, by being engaged in China to develop different levels of workers’ rights than if we just walk away from them.”Tags: China, Student Worker Participation Committee, Worker Participation Committeelast_img read more

Continue Reading

Hempstead Man Sentenced for Fatal DWI Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Hempstead man was sentenced Wednesday to 25 years to life in prison for killing a Roosevelt man in a drunken-driving crash while fleeing a Freeport shooting two years ago.Lloyd Williams had been convicted in September at Nassau County court of second-degree murder, manslaughter vehicular manslaughter, assault, vehicular assault, driving while intoxicated and unlicensed operation of a vehicle.Prosecutors said the 29-year-old and a friend got into a fight with bouncers at Phase Bar in after Williams was thrown out when a shot was fired and a nearby Freeport village police officer responded in the early morning hours of June 18, 2011.Williams and his friend fled in Williams’ Mitsubishi. Williams blew eight stop signs and six red lights while officers gave chase until he crashed with a Dodge Intrepid at the corner of Guy Lombardo Avenue.The other driver, 24-year-old Chad Whethers, was killed instantly and his vehicle was cut in half.Williams’ blood-alcohol content was found to be 0.27 percent and he had marijuana in his system.He suffered a broken right ankle and his passenger, who was not charged, suffered a broken neck.last_img read more

Continue Reading