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Solidarity needed as earthquake devastates Nepal

first_imgEarlier this month, millions of Nepal’s workers poured into the streets as they conducted a nationwide general strike.A powerful earthquake struck the impoverished country of Nepal on April 25. The original quake measured 7.8 on the Richter scale, with strong aftershocks measuring up to 6.7 causing further damage and injuries.As of April 27, the death toll has passed 3,800.  Thousands more are injured, with millions of people forced to live outside without shelter in freezing temperatures.The capital city of Katmandu, home to 1.2 million people, has been devastated. Tens of thousands are living on the streets. So far the government response has been weak: “It became clear that the Nepalese authorities were ill-equipped to rescue those trapped and would have trouble maintaining adequate supplies of water, electricity and food.” (New York Times, April 26)UNICEF officials announced that at least 940,000 Nepalese children in areas affected by the earthquake are “in urgent need of humanitarian attention.” (telegraph.co.uk, April 26)The U.S. has pledged a paltry $1 million in assistance to a country of 30 million people.Outside of the capital, particularly near the epicenter of the quake west of the capital, communities have been cut off from communication by landslides. Their fate remains largely unknown.  One village of 3,000 people in the Gorkha district managed to report that every house was destroyed.Helicopter rescue operations have begun, but they are devoted to removing the foreign tourists from Mount Everest, where they had gathered for the mountain climbing season.  The villages in the countryside, where most of Nepal’s people live, have so far been left on their own.Nepal is one of the poorest countries on the planet. The literacy rate is around 72 percent for men and only 45 percent for women.  Health care falls far short of the people’s needs.  Sixty percent of births are unattended by any medical professionals, causing many maternal and infant deaths as well as other severe complications.  Close to 30 percent of Nepal’s children less than five years old are malnourished.One-third of Nepal’s children under the age of 14, some 2 million, are forced into child labor.  In the extremely exploitative brick manufacturing industry, for example, some 28,000 children work at the kilns, half under the age of 14. (theguardian.com, Feb. 12)This catastrophe will only worsen the desperate plight of Nepal’s people.It took a decades-long struggle led by Maoist Communist parties to finally force the removal of the U.S.- and British-backed absolute monarchy in 2008 and establish parliamentary rule.  Some 17,000 people lost their lives in these struggles.  But despite the strong organization of these parties in Nepal, the country itself remains bitterly divided and still under the grip of multinational corporations.Earlier this month, millions of Nepal’s workers poured into the streets, many waving flags with hammers and sickles, as they conducted a nationwide general strike.  They had called this strike to promote constitutional changes that would give more rights to ethnic minorities living in the various regions of the country.This terrible crisis in Nepal calls for solidarity from workers’ organizations all over the world. U.S. and Western imperialism, which have long profited from the superexploitation of that country, have the responsibility of immediately providing all necessary emergency assistance to Nepal’s people with no strings attached.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Over 5,000 2nd level students ‘Choose Life’ at Cycle Against Suicide…

first_imgRELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR New marketing campaign to get more students into Limerick city centre Local landmarks Light Up Gold for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month TAGSCycle Against SuicideUniversity of Limerick (UL) New phase for UL’s Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Technology Centre Email Previous articleLGN: Guitar night for Dolan’s – hear guitar take centre stageNext articleThe spoken word, a writer’s life, and music Editor Advertisement NewsCommunityOver 5,000 2nd level students ‘Choose Life’ at Cycle Against Suicide Event in ULBy Editor – January 20, 2017 1084 Twittercenter_img Over 5,000 second level students descended on UL this week to take part in the Cycle Against Suicide Annual Youth Congress and share the message that ‘It’s Okay not to feel Okay’.  The event took place over two days, involved 100 schools, and included music acts and inspirational speakers which left all in attendance in no doubt that the future is in safe hands with the energy, enthusiasm and positivity of Irish teenagers today.Watch this video to get an idea of the amazing atmosphere on campus throughout the event.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up WhatsApp University of Limerick student who died in kayak accident gives gift of life Print Linkedin Facebook UL student scoops Live95 radio journalism award One to Watch Award presented to UL spin-out for the best pitch at Enterprise Ireland’s Big Ideas 2019last_img read more

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Meteorologists forecast more extreme weather events

first_img Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Weather forecasters say we can expect more extreme weather events like the Donegal floods in the coming years.Our average temperature is now over half a degree warmer than it was 30 year ago and this trend is expected to continue.Meteorologists from across the world are gathering in Dublin this week to discuss how they can give people better weather information.Climatologist John Sweeney says we’re likely to see more extreme weather events like Donegal in the coming years. The floods there were described as once in a 100 year event but John says it’s getting worse as temperatures continue to rise:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/sweeney.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.Met Eireann’s weather warning system came in for criticism after the disaster – but head of forecasting Gerald Fleming says while they’re good at predicting weather systems it’s much harder to predict localised weather.They’re working on increasing the number of weather stations around the country to improve accuracy but it’s a costly process. Gerald says we should continue to pay attention to the warnings and familiarise ourselves with weather forecast:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/gerald.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By News Highland – September 4, 2017 Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleFlood relief depot fills seven skips with unusable “donations”Next articleNational Geographic Traveller edition featuring Donegal launched News Highland Meteorologists forecast more extreme weather events Google+ Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Google+center_img Pinterest Twitter Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Homepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebooklast_img read more

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Kazuo Ishiguro’s (mostly) brilliant blandness

first_imgOn Thursday, the English writer Kazuo Ishiguro was awarded the Nobel Prize in literature. In giving the honor the committee noted that the author had crafted “novels of great emotional force” that “uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” Ishiguro’s fiction has provoked strong reactions, from praise to dismay, throughout his long career. One reader who has written from both perspectives is Harvard professor and New Yorker book critic James Wood, who shared his response to the Nobel in a Gazette Q&A.GAZETTE: In a 2015 review of “The Buried Giant” you said that Ishiguro writes “eccentrically against the norms.” Can you elaborate?WOOD: Ishiguro does his own thing, and his work doesn’t resemble anyone else’s. He has written historical fiction set in Japan (“An Artist of the Floating World”), England (“The Remains of the Day”), and Shanghai (“When We Were Orphans”). He has written dystopian science fiction (“Never Let Me Go”) and historical fantasy (“The Buried Giant” is set in seventh-century Britain, and features dragons, ogres, and knights). He is undistracted by literary fashion or the demands of the market. In this, he somewhat resembles another British Nobel laureate, William Golding, who wrote very curious, often fantastical or allegorical novels, and wonderfully seemed not to give a damn what anyone thought of them.GAZETTE: Do you have a favorite Ishiguro book?WOOD: I have two favorite Ishiguro books, each utterly unlike the other: “The Remains of the Day,” his perfect evocation of repressed (and politically sinister) English country house life in the late 1930s, and “Never Let Me Go,” his dystopian fantasy about cloned schoolchildren, who are living out their short lives at a special boarding school before being called up to “donate” their organs to more fortunate, uncloned British citizens. It’s a terrifying allegory of mortal human life.GAZETTE: Is there one thing you like the most about his writing or that you think he does best?WOOD: He does a kind of extreme calmness of tone — really a kind of punitive blandness — very well. This might not sound like high praise, except that he puts it to uncanny uses: That smooth blandness wonderfully enacts and mimics the political repressions and omissions of the worlds of “The Remains of the Day” and “An Artist of the Floating World.” And he made good sinister use of that blandness in “Never Let Me Go,” which in one sense is a grindingly banal account of English boarding school life, until you begin to realize that the story you are reading is really the story of a death camp, not the story of a boarding school.GAZETTE: Is there anything in his writing that frustrates you?WOOD: I think that when Ishiguro is off, that same blandness can be pretty boring. I found “The Unconsoled” very hard to read, and I found his last novel, “The Buried Giant,” to be an allegory at once too vague and too literal. His very distinctive style needs the pressure of form to put it to proper use: Both “The Remains of the Day” and “Never Let Me Go” are formally cunning works. “The Unconsoled” and “The Buried Giant” are foggy, amorphous, miasmic.GAZETTE: He’s often been compared to Franz Kafka. In your mind, what is it about his work that evokes that comparison?WOOD: The Kafka comparison seems fair — perhaps Ishiguro is closer to the Kafka of “The Castle” than to the terrors of “The Trial.” In “The Castle,” Kafka evokes a world of crushing procedural banality, in which the hero is routinely blocked from his ambition — to get to the castle — by the most mundane of obstacles. The allegory emerges very naturally from the style. That is exactly how “Never Let Me Go” works, too: The allegory emerges gradually, and very naturally, from the humdrum concerns of the style.last_img read more

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Lynx Edge Bucks

first_img Bio Hancock County Court News Nov. 3 thorugh Dec. 11 – January 22, 2015 State budget vs. job creation – January 22, 2015 admin House fire in Winter Harbor – October 27, 2014 Latest Posts BUCKSPORT — The unbeaten Mattanawcook Academy Lynx nipped the Golden Bucks 3-2 on Friday as Tayla Trask pitched a three-hitter and struck out 13.Shelby Redman had an RBI single and Emily Lenor and Sarah Sutherland singled for the Golden Bucks, who committed five errors. For more sports stories, pick up a copy of The Ellsworth American. Latest posts by admin (see all) This is placeholder textThis is placeholder textlast_img

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