Tag: 风花雪月论坛

Speech: Antimicrobial resistance needs an urgent global response

first_imgThe purpose of the World Economic Forum is to bring together world leaders and big business to solve the world’s most difficult problems.One of these problems is antimicrobial resistance, where the world has come together over the last 5 years, but so much progress needs to be made, to stop an otherwise terrible future.As health secretary responsible for one of the most advanced healthcare systems in the world, I could not look my children in the eyes unless I knew I was doing all in my power to solve this great threat. When we have time to act. But the urgency is now.Each and every one of us benefits from antibiotics, but we all too easily take them for granted, and I shudder at the thought of a world in which their power is diminished.Antimicrobial resistance is as big a danger to humanity as climate change or warfare. That’s why we need an urgent global response.The UK has taken a global lead by setting out a 20-year AMR vision explaining the steps we must take nationally and internationally to rise to this challenge. It fits into a pattern of work across the world to keep this driving forward.The plan incorporates 3 things we all need to do: prevention, innovation, and collaboration.First: preventing infections is vital. We have today set a target in the UK of cutting resistant infections by 10% within the next 5 years.We’re going to cut antibiotic use by a further 15% within 5 years by only using antibiotics when absolutely necessary. Everybody can play a part in only using antibiotics when they’re really ill.And we’re going to work with the livestock industry to build on the amazing 40% reduction in antibiotic usage in just 5 years – 71% in chicken farming, while increasing productivity by 11%.We’re going to do it through immunisation, better infection control and working with doctors, vets, farmers and patients to prevent unnecessary prescription of antibiotics.Second: innovation. There hasn’t been a single, new class of antibiotic since the 1980s.No new innovation in the most basic bedrock of every health service in the world – shocking. And deeply troubling.Any health secretary or minister, who doesn’t lie awake at night worrying about that last pack of antibiotics, must have a prescription to some seriously strong sleeping pills.We know the reasons why. Compared to expensive new cancer or heart drugs, putting time and money into developing new antibiotics is commercially unattractive for pharmaceutical companies.And under the traditional model of revenue linked to volume, there is an added disincentive for pharmaceutical companies with a product that must be conserved.So we need a new model, one that works with, and incentivises the pharmaceutical industry.And this is where the NHS, because of its unique position, can take a global lead in pioneering a new payment system, one that reflects the true value of antibiotics to society.At the heart of it is changing the way we think of antibiotics from a medical product to a medical service.It’s a service that we all rely on: patients, doctors, and pharmaceutical companies.So within 6 months, the NHS is going to start work on paying for the service, and security, of having access to critical antibiotics when we need them, rather than hoping there’s a product we can buy in the future.We’re going to be more of a Spotify subscriber than a vinyl record shopper.We will pay upfront so pharmaceutical companies know that it’s worthwhile for them to invest the estimated £1 billion it costs to develop a new drug.We will work with the industry to develop the next generation of antibiotics, ones that are available and accessible to all.But the only way this system can incentivise innovation globally, is if it is expanded globally.Which brings me to my third and final point: collaboration.I am proud of the work the UK has done to secure antimicrobial resistance on the global agenda. We’re playing our part both at home and on the world stage.Because we recognise that none of us can stand alone against AMR. It won’t be solved by one nation, no single action or intervention.It is a fight that requires continued collaboration, across borders, now and in the future.I’ve been meeting health ministers from across the world here to agree further action, and next week the UN inter-agency co-ordination group are publishing their draft recommendations on the next steps needed to tackle AMR.Hopefully that will take us one step closer.It is a challenge, I believe, we can rise to if every step forward, we push ourselves further. Together, I’m convinced that with a proper plan we can achieve that goal.last_img read more

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Mountain Mama | A Walk in the Woods

first_imgAn afternoon walk in the woods became my reward for a morning of writing during my week-long writing residency at the Weymouth Center for the Arts. It was a simple thing. Trails meandered behind the twenty-room estate under a forest of longleaf pines.The Weymouth house, with its warm polished wood floors and thoughtfully decorated furnishings provided the type of space that makes me want to rise as a writer, to string together words worthy of that sacred place. Legends like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe honed their craft there. After the solitude of writing in an-almost-empty-historical home, the noises in the forest were a welcome relief to the words prattling inside my head. The mundane seemed extraordinary after all the self-imposed quiet – the whispering breeze, the scampering squirrels, and the chirping birds.1273305_10153447198041299_3913621511601840679_oI’d come back and my afternoon writing stint often stretched long into the evening. Sometimes the words flowed. Other times I just stared at the blank screen. At times such an intense loneliness set in that it felt excruciating to sit still for another minute. I paced around the library, looking at the photographs of famous authors inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. I knew that two other men were staying there, in separate wings. The only sign I saw of them those first few days was the placard hanging on their respective doors, “Writer working. Please do not disturb. ”10317784_10153447193856299_792300550543255459_oBy nightfall, I locked myself in my bedroom. Staying at Weymouth felt like living in a museum, one steeped in history, guarded by spirits. I worried about getting lost in the twisting hallways or stumbling on one of the many steps that led up or down into yet another wing. In the middle of the night, my door banged shut or the window rattled. At some point every night, I woke up afraid. One morning I bumped into another writer in the kitchen. Matter-of-factly he mentioned that he always has such vivid dreams while staying at Weymouth. He’s an established author with four published books and has stayed at Weymouth several times. I wanted to hug him, so relieved was I that I wasn’t the only one. For the past few nights there, I’d seen dead friends in my dreams. I’d spent the night with past lovers. I had dreamt about my son and felt sad that it would still be a few more days before I saw him again. I woke up each morning exhausted. I wondered if it was worth it, counting the hours until the freaked-out nights passed, struggling to be productive and focused. Toward the end of the week, I wanted to get out of there. I’m prone to escapism. When I stay put for too long, I get the urge to go. When I’ve been gone for too many days in a row, I long to stay put. I’ve tried staying and I’ve left more than I haven’t, all the while wanting a break from the only person I couldn’t get a break from – myself.1599368_10153447155551299_5180097153021211259_oThe words on the page were undeniably me, and there was no escaping that, so I went the only place I could, into the woods. I walked and walked, taking one trail to the next until I was back where I started. Some days the sun tempted me to linger longer. I’d sprawl my body on the moss.  I stretched my legs and arms out long, taking up as much room as I could. Surrendering to the earth like that somehow helped me lay it all down on the page, all the magic and tragic twists my life had taken, leading me on unintended and soul-smashingly beautiful adventure of single parenting in the South.By day six, I’d achieved what I’d set out to do – my manuscript, just shy of 80,000 words, about 280 pages of a book. I’ve edited it and honed it down to be the best I’m capable of making it. I’d brought it as far as I could.At Weymouth, I had to square up with myself, to dig deeper, and to sit still for longer than I imagined possible. Only then did I meet a version of myself who settled into being alone.[divider]More from Mountain Mama[/divider]last_img read more

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What does the future hold for British top fruit?

first_imgAs the British apple industry stands on the cusp of an exciting new era, thought leaders join forces to provide a comprehensive review of what the future holds. Featuring original contributions from Government, the Fresh Produce Journal, future trends agency WGSN Insights, agricultural research institute NIAB EMR and King’s College London, the paper is packed with essential information and insights on sustainability, the nutritional profile of apples and pears as well as the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead for the industry.Download this free report to find out more. The Grocer may use your contact data to keep you informed of its products and services by email. You can withdraw your marketing consent at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in such email or by sending an email to [email protected] More information on our processing can be found in our Privacy Notice. By submitting this form, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Privacy Notice.last_img read more

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Bulldogs Freshman Victorious Over Cougars

first_imgThe Batesville 9th grade basketball team were victorious at South Decatur on Monday night. The Bulldogs defeated the Cougars by a score of 42-36.Batesville was led in scoring by Zach Britton with 16. Peyton Meyer and Zach Prickel each chipped in 8 in the winning effort. Other scorers for Batesville were Alex Roell (6), John Harmeyer (2), and Anthony Butz (2).“Really happy with our guys tonight. We attacked the basket downhill and got a lot of high percentage looks. And if we didn’t get points from the field we converted from the line.”  Batesville Coach Ben Siefert.The Bulldogs are now 2-1 on the season, and will be in action again next Monday night, when they travel to Indian Creek. Tip time is 6:00pm.Submitted by Batesville Coach Ben Siefert. Ben Siefertlast_img

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Wisconsin men’s track and field nudge Missouri, win Tom Botts Invitational

first_imgWith victories in nine of 18 events, the Wisconsin men’s track team took home top honors Saturday against host Missouri 92-90 at the Tom Botts Invitational.The Badgers and Tigers were the only two teams in the invitational making it a duel between the two squads; however, Wisconsin eventually came out on top thanks to a balance in both the track and field events, winning four of the track events and five field events.On the track, UW was led individually by Babatunde Awosika, a senior sprinter from Milwaukee. Awosika garnered wins in the 200 and 400 meters and not only won both races, but set personal bests in the two events as well. In his first race in the 200 meters, Awosika finished first in a time of 21.44 seconds, which was the fastest time in the event for a Badger this season and the fastest time for Awosika in the 200 in his career. Awosika followed that performance up in the 400 meters with a first-place finish in a time of 47.17, once again the fastest time for a UW athlete in the event this season.A pair of other Wisconsin sprinters outside of Awosika also finished strong in the 200 and 400 meter races, as freshman Ryan Davis and junior Garret Payne finished right behind Awosika in both races coming in second and third, respectively.The other wins for Wisconsin in the track events came via the relays, and the two victories near the end of the invitational in the 4×100 and 4×400 meter relays helped the Badgers just outpace the Tigers. In the 4×100 meter relay, Wisconsin won the event with a trio of freshmen running along with Payne. The quartet consisting of Payne, Brandon Kappel, Justin Rabon and James Stecker finished the distance of the track in 40.90 seconds, just under a second ahead of Missouri, which finished in a time of 41.73.Then, in the last event of the day in the 4×400 meter relay Wisconsin came in first place once again, toppling Missouri in a time of 3:13.94. The Badgers second relay team of Shawn Michels, William Ottow, Aaron Thompson and Justin Rabon also outpaced the first relay team of the Tigers, finishing in a time of 3:19.94, just under two seconds ahead of Missouri’s first relay team.Meanwhile in the field events, Wisconsin was led yet again by Japheth Cato who had two of the Badgers’ five victories in those events. The decorated UW senior had the top marks in the pole vault (17-1 1/2) and the long jump (24-1). Another Badger also came out near the top in the pole vault, as freshman Jesse Johnson also cleared 17-1 1/2, which led him to a second place finish and was also a personal best in the outdoor season.Wisconsin’s other three wins in the invitational came in the throws, where the Badgers had individuals who won the shot put, hammer throw and discus. In the shot put, UW sophomore Andrew Brekke finished in first place with his throw of 51-6 1/2. Then in the hammer throw, Wisconsin’s Scott Erickson tossed a season-best 190-foot-10 inches, while Alex Thompson threw 178-11 in the discus, which was a personal best on the season for him.Wisconsin has just one meet left — the Wisconsin open in Madison next weekend — before the Big Ten Outdoor Championships begin May 16 in West Lafayette, Ind.Uwbadgers.com contributed to this story.last_img read more

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