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Vulfpeck Welcomes Rachael Price, Performs Dubstep At Brooklyn Steel Closer

first_imgYou can also, and should also, check out clips from Joey Dosik’s sensational show-opener below: Setlist: Vulfpeck | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NYC | 9/8/17Intros, Fugue State, Cory Wong, El Chepe, Game Winner, Tesla, 1612, Aunt Leslie, Boogie On / Lord Will Make A Way, Funky Duck, Wait For The Moment, Back Pocket, Beastly, Christmas In LA, Dean Town, OutroSetlist: Vulfpeck | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NYC | 9/9/17Outro, Cory Wong, My First Car, Smile Meditation, Fleetwood Mac, 1612, Aunt Leslie, Boogie On, Lord Will Make A Way, Funky Duck, Wait For The Moment, Back Pocket, Beastly, Christmas In LA, Dean Town, Jealous GuySetlist: Vulfpeck | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NYC | 9/10/17Fugue State, Cory Wong, Animal Spirits, Daddy, He Bought A Tesla, Fleetwood Mac*, 1612, Aunt Leslie, Boogie On, Lord Will Make A Way, Funky Duck, Wait For The Moment, Back Pocket, Beastly, Christmas In LA, Dean Town, It Gets Funkier*w/ Rachael Price from Lake Street Dive,You can also, and should also, check out clips from Joey Dosik’s sensational show-opener below:,Setlist: Vulfpeck | Brooklyn Steel | Brooklyn, NYC | 9/8/17Intros, Fugue State, Cory Wong, El Chepe, Game Winner, Tesla, 1612, Aunt Leslie, Boogie On / Lord Will Make A Way, Funky Duck, Wait For The Moment, Back Pocket, Beastly, Christmas In LA, Dean Town, Outro Vulfpeck wrapped up their third and final show at Brooklyn Steel on Sunday, delivering yet-another performance for the history books to their third sellout crowd in as many nights. While the opening Friday night show was surely special, the Saturday and Sunday performances raised the bar to an all-time high, the Ann Arbor-bred quartet (and some very talented friends) captivating and commanding the audience like a force to be reckoned with throughout the weekend.The band is, and forever will be, Jack Stratton, Joe Dart, Theo Katzman, and Woody Goss, though Vulfpeck’s show has evolved into a family-style meal of guest collaborators, as percussionist Richie Rodriguez, guitarist Cory Wong, vocalist Antwaun Stanley, and vocalist/keyboardist/saxophonist Joey Dosik remained stage-put for large portions of the set. New York reliables Melissa Gardiner (trombone), Ibanda Ruhumbika (tuba), and Mark Dover (clarinet) became weekend staples as they contributed the embellishments necessary for the songs to continue to grow with time. Sunday night’s performance featured vocalist Rachael Price of Lake Street Dive for a cover of Fleetwood Mac‘s “Say You Love Me.”While the majority of the setlists remained the same over the weekend, they were differentiated by the first five songs of each night. Brooklyn Steel was treated to a mix of new and old rarities, including “Fugue State,” “El Chepe,” “Daddy, He Got A Tesla,” “Smile Meditation,” and “Animal Spirits,” which featured a horn section for the first time ever.Of course, all three nights were awarded with the love-pounding “1612,” the dance-driving “Funky Duck,” the heart-warming “Wait For The Moment,” and the sing-a-long favorite “Back Pocket.” Each night was similarly driven home with a “Beastly” and “Dean Town” Joe Dart bass badass-ery clinic, affectionately separated by “Christmas in LA.” Sunday night closed with their “dub step” version of “It Gets Funkier,” during which Jack Stratton used his cell phone as a probably-real/probably-not synthesizer and bippity-bopped his way to a 21 second hand stand to culminate the show. The band goes on to Europe this week, with sold-out runs in Paris, Brussels, Amsterdam, Berlin, Glasgow, London, and Dublin.Thanks to Evan Pragliola, you can enjoy videos from Sunday night’s show below:last_img read more

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Bolivia Will Have Radar Systems for Border Surveillance

first_imgBy Dialogo August 11, 2011 The Bolivian government announced the installation of a radar system for border surveillance in the fight against drug trafficking, Interior Minister Sacha Llorenti said. The project is the responsibility of that country’s Defense Ministry. “Brazil is going to have (radars) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Argentina is going to deploy its radars, and we have to do our part. What we need is radar coverage along our borders with the relevant standards, air capability, helicopters for the fight against drug trafficking, and increases in our ties with other countries,” Llorenti told Bolivian daily La Razón. According to the newspaper, the project will accompany the six laws being drafted in the context of the 2011-2015 Strategy for the Fight against Drug Trafficking and the Reduction of Excess Coca Crops, being drafted by the administration, as well as those dedicated to controlling coca and other controlled substances, which will replace Law 1008. Likewise, in July, Argentina’s ambassador to Bolivia, Horacio Macedo, announced that his country would install 20 radars along its borders with Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil, in order to make a significant contribution to the fight against illegal drug trafficking in the context of Decree 1091, the objective of which is to implement Operation Northern Shield, planned by our security ministry. The Brazilian ambassador in La Paz, Marcel Fortuna Biato, said that surveillance of the border airspace will be conducted with mutual overflight authorization. “We’re going to share each piece of information, which will enable us to conduct significant operations. We also want to improve those conditions with Peru, Chile, and Paraguay,” Sacha Llorenti concluded. Finally, Llorenti affirmed that the only remaining hurdles to the signing of a trilateral agreement among Brazil, Bolivia, and the United States for the fight against drug trafficking are “details that at least on the Bolivian side have already been resolved.”last_img read more

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What Does Comcast-Time Warner Merger Mean for Cablevision and Newsday?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Consolidation is coming to the American cable television industry, but what that portends for the future of Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp. and their subsidiary, Newsday, is far from clear.Earlier this year Comcast, the largest cable company in the country, announced its intention to buy Time Warner Cable, the nation’s second-largest cable company, for $45 billion, in a deal that still requires federal approval. The announcement fueled speculation that the other big cable operators, including Cablevision, which is reportedly the fourth-largest in the business with its 3 million subscribers, could be up for grabs. And if another company gobbled up Cablevision, would it retain or unload Newsday, which it acquired in 2008 from the Tribune Company for $650 million? With the Dolan family’s backing, Long Island’s lone daily newspaper has survived the downslide of the digital age, but it’s hard to tell if that would continue under new ownership.Certainly, cable, not newspapers, is where all the acquisition action is these days.“We have the financial flexibility to chase a few more rabbits,” John Malone, the billionaire investor whose holding company, Liberty Media, is Charter Communication’s largest stockholder, told Bloomberg News, referring to Charter’s bid for Time Warner Cable that it lost to Comcast.Some industry analysts thought his comment meant that Cablevision was suddenly in the cross-hairs because Charter’s current chief executive, Thomas Rutledge, had once been a top dog at Cablevision until he resigned in December 2011 after not seeing eye to eye with Cablevision’s grand poobah, James Dolan. But, Malone had told Bloomberg in October that he didn’t see Cablevision as a merger target because it didn’t have room left to grow in the pay-TV households of Long Island.Wall Street analysts agree.“Relative to other operators, Cablevision suffers the worst of both worlds,” media analyst Craig Moffett wrote in a November report for Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., an investment research firm he then worked for. “Its starting penetration is already almost double its peers, making it harder to gain and easier to lose.”If anyone outside the Dolan family knew the ins and outs of Cablevision, it would be Rutledge, asserted some analysts willing to dismiss any bad blood lingering between him and Dolan. The Cablevision scion himself added to the speculation when he gave a rare interview to The Wall Street Journal last summer when he refused to say whether the Dolans would still own the company two decades from now.“You can’t rule out the possibility of a sale,” he admitted.But, a big development in the cable industry last week significantly changes the dynamic, analysts say. On April 28, Charter and Comcast agreed on a deal that would let Charter pick up some 3 million subscribers that Comcast wants to divest while swapping its subscribers in areas of the country Charter prefers not to serve. Assuming the merger passes muster with the U.S. Department of Justice as well as the Federal Communications Commission, Charter would become dominant in the Midwest and Comcast Time Warner Cable would become dominant on both Coasts.Just as importantly, Charter would become the second-largest cable company in the country behind Comcast, which would have 30 million subscribers, or about 30 percent of the cable industry. The prospect of one media entity wielding that much control doesn’t sit well with consumer advocates—or with U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who criticized the merger at recent Senate committee hearings, calling it “a disaster.”“We’ve been opposed to the Comcast Time Warner deal since it was announced,” said Harold Feld, senior vice president at Public Knowledge, a non-profit, pro-consumer group based in Washington, D.C. “Adding Charter into the mix has not made it any prettier from our perspective.”But the new deals suggest that Cablevision is off the table—for now.“Charter is not going to be in a position to make a big acquisition,” Feld told the Press. “Charter will need to take some time absorbing [Comcast’s subscribers] and restructuring before they could even think about acquiring somebody else.”Industry analyst Craig Moffett, now at his own firm, MoffettNathanson LLC, put it this way: “The question used to be whether Cablevision is for sale. The question now is who would be the buyer?” Moffett told the Press.“Comcast is restricted,” he said. “They’re selling subscribers to fit under the FCC’s ceiling. Time Warner Cable is out of the picture. Charter is divesting the last of its presence on the East Coast. I think at this point it would be hard to find a buyer.”The prospects for Charter buying Cablevision definitely “took a hit,” according to Lance Vitanza, managing director and partner at CRT Capital Group, based in Stamford, Conn.“If you thought a Cablevision deal was going to happen in the near term, now the timing is going to be pushed off,” he told the Press. “Charter is certainly not going to do another deal in the midst of doing this deal.”A Cablevision representative declined to comment.BATTLE OF THE BROADBANDWhat’s been driving the cable industry to consolidate is the desire to gain leverage over the networks, content producers and program providers in order to stifle rising prices for retransmission and carrying fees.It was a dispute over higher fees charged by the Fox Network that had led to Cablevision imposing a service blackout for two weeks in October 2010, which generated a class action lawsuit that is still winding its way through the federal justice system. In a similar scuffle last fall, Time Warner Cable blacked out the CBS network and its related channels, like Showtime, for almost a month in a dispute over how much it was paying for their programs and then had to concede defeat as the NFL football season began. As Time Warner Cable’s chairman and chief executive, Glenn Britt, told The New York Times, “We certainly didn’t get everything we wanted.”Dolan had told the Journal last August that Cablevision’s position in the New York metropolitan market “helps us have more leverage than our size would dictate,” when it comes to pushing back against content providers’ strong-arm tactics to raise programming prices. But, he added that “there could come a day” when his company decides to drop TV and shift to broadband as its main offering.“We are going to continue to do the right things for the shareholders,” he told the Journal.“Cablevision has generally had the problem that the Dolan family has often been at odds with other investors,” said Feld, of Public Knowledge. “They have a good, compact market but they have never been successful at finding a good way to expand.”An industry analyst based in the New York metropolitan area who spoke on background explained the skepticism prevailing on Wall Street regarding Cablevision’s James Dolan, who announced at the beginning of April that he was naming himself chief executive officer, his wife Kristin Dolan the new chief operating officer and Brian Sweeney the new president.“For years there’s been a positive and a negative in Cablevision stock,” the investment expert told the Press. “The positive is that somebody someday is going to consolidate Manhattan and Long Island. But not anymore. Not for a very long time.“The negative has always been called ‘The Jimmy Discount,’” the analyst continued. “People hate him. He’s not a great manager and he does stupid things. I think he bought Newsday with as much forethought as he bought Clearview Cinemas and the Whiz. I don’t think he ever gave a shit about journalism. But I think there are tax reasons why Newsday will hang on as part of Cablevision for a while to come.”Last July, when Newsday announced that publisher Fred Groser was going to retire at the year’s end, New York Post media columnist Keith J. Kelly reported that his pending departure sparked “renewed speculation that parent Cablevision is readying the Long Island paper for a sale…” As it turned out, Kelly was wrong, but the rumors persist, fueled in March when Gordon McLeod was named publisher—the third one in the six years since the $4.4-billion cable operator bought Newsday.Asked about the stubborn scuttlebutt that the Long Island tabloid is again on the auction block, Newsday deferred to Cablevision.“As a matter of long-standing policy, we do not comment on rumors or speculation in the media,” a Cablevision spokeswoman said.In its recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Cablevision reported that Newsday had suffered almost $150 million in operating losses over the last three years: $71.1 million in 2013, $47 million in 2012 and $31.7 million in 2011. According to Newsday’s most recent filing with the Alliance for Audited Media, the paper’s total average print circulation was approximately 255,000 on weekdays, about 251,000 on Saturdays and 313,000 on Sundays, representing a decline of a 6.4 percent, 5.3 percent and 5.6 percent, respectively, compared to a comparable period the year before.“You simply can’t take a cable company and a newspaper and expect them to play nicely together,” says Jaci Clement, the director of the nonprofit Fair Media Council, an LI media watchdog group. “The philosophies are different. The products are different. The cultures are different.”She said Cablevision’s ownership of Newsday has been a “lose-lose-lose situation” for the Island.“Newsday is treated like an addition, not as an integral part of the operation,” she said. “[It] has been diminished from being one of the best metro papers in the country… The public has no diversity in the news offered by Newsday and News12…. Cablevision financially supported a candidate that Newsday endorsed yet Newsday repeatedly failed to disclose Cablevision’s contributions. Journalistically, that’s so bad it’s off the charts.”But with Verizon FiOS a distant competitor—same goes for satellite TV—Cablevision is firmly in the driver’s seat and Long Islanders are just along for the ride.last_img read more

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Luxury car dealer Greg Willims has made a renewed push to sell his luxury Ascot home

first_img50 Pringle St, Ascot. Picture: realestate.com.auMr Willims said the home was only four years old when they bought it. But as the couple own another home in Brisbane (just a few blocks away) and a rural property they are keen to sell and hope the spring selling season will be good timing for them.“This is a positive time of year to sell and to buy, especially with the festive season approaching, and the changeover in school years,’’ Mr Willims said. Brisbane luxury car dealer Greg Willims and his wife Susanne have made a renewed push to sell their Pringle St, home. Photographer: Liam Kidston.BRISBANE luxury car man, Greg Willims and his wife Susanne have made a renewed push to sell their 50 Pringle St, Ascot home.Mr Willims is the Dealer Principal Bentley Brisbane. Last year he sold much of his luxury car empire to Autosports Group.The couple bought the home in 2007, when it was about four years old.The five-bedroom home has been listed for auction on November 4 through Milan Markanovic of Tom Offermann Real Estate – Noosa Heads.More from news02:37Purchasers snap up every residence in the $40 million Siarn Palm Beach North3 hours agoNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by 50 Pringle St, Ascot. Picture: realestate.com.auIt is a three-storey house with block parquetry floors and timber-framed French doors. There are casual dining areas and outdoor areas as well as a formal dining room which opens onto a fully-landscaped courtyard garden. 50 Pringle St, Ascot. Picture: realestate.com.au“So, we have decided on a short marketing campaign with an agency which is expert in prestige property, and an auction timed for the new family owners to enjoy Christmas is their new home.’’Mr Willims said it had been a “lovely, comfortable family home’’ and his favourite part was the north-east corner which had substantial entertainment areas, and enjoyed the sunshine in winter.last_img read more

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Dutch agricultural scheme headed for premium increase

first_imgBPL is the first large sector scheme in the Netherlands to want to significantly raise its contribution in 2020.Social partners are considering an increase to BPL’s premium by another 1.4% in 2021, possibly in combination with an accrual reduction.At the moment, annual pensions accrual is 1.875%, which equates to the maximum tax-facilitated level.As a consequence of the new agreement, BPL’s premium coverage ratio is to rise to approximately 75% in 2021.Other large pension funds, including ABP, PFZW, PME and PMT, have announced they would keep their premiums unchanged next year.However, three of them have indicated that a sharp increase of contributions in 2021 cannot be avoided.The €29bn multi-sector pension fund PGB has said it would keep its contribution for 2020 at the current level, but would apply a 4% increase for 2021.The decision of the large industry-wide pension funds to stick to the current status quo next year has drawn criticism from pension experts.Marc Heemskerk, actuary at Mercer, has warned that this would lead to bigger rights cuts later.Consultancy Willis Towers Watson said that, if interest rates remained at the current low level, the minimum required contribution may have to rise by up to 40%. Employers and trade unions in the agricultural sector said they want to raise the contribution at industry-wide pension fund (BPL) by 3.3% to 25%, in order to improve the scheme’s funding.Although BPL does not have to increase its premium – its agreement for a fixed contribution extends to 2022 – social partners want to improve the scheme’s financial health earlier, explained Richard Devue, the pension fund’s director.He said social partners have become increasingly aware that BPL’s current pension plan is no longer future-proof.At the end of November, BPL’s coverage ratio stood at 92.4%, while its “premium funding” – which indicates to what extent the paid in contributions in a given year are sufficient to finance new pension claims – was approximately 60%.last_img read more

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Ronaldo: I had no problem with Juventus players

first_img Promoted Content7 Of The Wealthiest Universities In The World2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This Year5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeIs This The Most Delicious Food In The World?World’s Most Delicious FoodsFantastic-Looking (and Probably Delicious) Bread Art7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do ThisWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?Who Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?18 Cities With Neverending Tourist-Flow “We had some wonderful games against each other and you really didn’t need all the stuff going on behind the scenes.” Ronaldo cherishes his time in Italy and believes Calcio figures didn’t get the rewards they deserved. read also:Ronaldo, Mayweather own supercars but not richest collection in sport “I’d say there are four players who didn’t win the Ballon d’Or, but should’ve done: Alessandro Del Piero, Paolo Maldini, Francesco Totti and Raul. I’d also add Roberto Carlos, who was twice in second place behind me.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 The Inter Milan hero insists he respects the Juve team of that time. “I can understand mistakes and referee can get it wrong too,” said Ronaldo of the denied penalty and later eruption of the Calciopoli scandal in 2006. “I’ve no problem with the players, you all had nothing to do with the story of Luciano Moggi, Roberto Bettega and the rest…Advertisement Loading… Brazil’s World Cup legend, Ronaldo, has insisted he had no problem with Juventus’ players over the 2006 Calciopoli scandal.last_img read more

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