Tag: 附近聊天交友的软件

International Organizations for Freedom of Expression Urge to Receive Rapporteurs from United Nations and IACHR

first_img Receive email alerts Follow the news on Mexico They highlighted the importance of opening “the door to the above-mentioned special rapporteurs to examine the rising level of violence and propose solutions that tackle impunity, once and for all.” The special rapporteurs for freedom of expression at the UN and the IACHR have made an official request to visit the country to evaluate the situation, yet it has remained unanswered by the Mexican government. NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say Protest against the murder of Mexican journalist Javier Valdez occured in Culiacan, Sinaloa on May 15, 2017, in Monterrey, Mexico, on May 20, 2017. Julio Cesar AGUILAR / AFP RSF_en May 29, 2017 – Updated on May 30, 2017 International Organizations for Freedom of Expression Urge to Receive Rapporteurs from United Nations and IACHR News The letter was signed by the directors of the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA), Reporters Without Borders (RSF), ARTICLE19, International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), Fundación Nuevo Periodismo Iberoamericano Gabriel García Márquez (FNPI), Dart Center for Journalism and Trauma, Rory Peck Trust, Committee to Protect Journalists (CPJ), and Freedom House. Dismayed by the murder of journalist Javier Valdez on May 15 in Culiacán, the organizations jointly condemned the increase in murders and attacks against journalists during the current six-year term. MexicoAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalistsInternational bodies Organized crimeCorruptionImpunityViolence The organizations united to “speak with one voice in asking your government to step up its efforts to end the impunity for those who wish to silence journalists and rid the country of the pervasive mentality that believes intimidating an editor or a reporter carries no consequences.” Organisation 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Help by sharing this information April 28, 2021 Find out more News World organizations for the defense and promotion of freedom of expression asked President Peña Nieto to invite the special rapporteurs for Freedom of Expression at the United Nations (UN) and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) to find solutions to the crisis of violence and impunity affecting Mexican journalism. to go further The organizations also urged the government “to sincerely commit itself to engaging in meaningful dialogue and implementing effective solutions on behalf of the profession of journalism, before the environment for freedom of expression worsens any further.” May 13, 2021 Find out more Reports News May 5, 2021 Find out more Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Related documents See English LetterPDF – 164.39 KB MexicoAmericas Condemning abusesProtecting journalistsInternational bodies Organized crimeCorruptionImpunityViolence last_img read more

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Charlatan by name, gentleman by nature

first_imgTony Rogers is cheerful – and well he might be. The Charlatans are about to release their eighth album, Up at the Lake, which marks fifteen years of Brit-rock ascendancy. The band’s longevity is phenomenal, given the fickle nature of the music industry and of the listening public, but their new album proves that they find no difficulty in creating music that sounds fresh and original, even after fifteen years. “We don’t do history”, remarks Rogers, and you can see what he means. Each Charlatans album retains its own identity, thanks to the fact that the music they write reflects exactly their circumstances at the time of production. For example, “There are a couple of sad songs on this album, which I wrote because I had just lost someone close to me. In general, though, I think that the album sounds very English, because it was recorded here and that’s influenced it.” So what exactly makes the album sound ‘English’? Rogers thinks that it’s the mellow truthfulness of the words, the way that it talks about love and loss and life without flinching. “It’s pretty realistic about things like that,” he says. “Basically, the album does exactly what is says on the tin.” Their previous album, Live it Like You Love it, bears little relation to the relaxed and melodic stylings of Up at the Lake. Rogers points out that “it’s got a sunny, upbeat kind of sound, which is probably because we recorded it in California. It definitely sounds Californian, and I think that tradition influenced us – you know, The Beach Boys and that kind of thing.” Fair enough then – it’s clear that The Charlatans’ sound is defined by what they experience. But who, exactly, are The Charlatans? Rogers describes the band as “just four other blokes who are on exactly the same wave-length as me.” And what wave-length might that be? “We don’t want to change the world. We just want to make better records,” he enthuses. “We just want to rock and roll, and anyone who wants to join us – well, please do!” He needn’t ask; it seems that plenty of people have already joined in the fun. Interestingly, a large proportion of the band’s fanbase seems to be fairly young – that is to say, it consists of people who were tripping up in the primary school playground when the band were just starting to make it big. “The people who started out with us in ‘89 have gone off to get married and have kids. They’re still with us, but they don’t really come to gigs anymore, so it’s nice to have a younger generation of fans as well.” It’s not hard to see why – for a band that’s been around so long that, in musical years, they should be resting on Fender zimmerframes when performing live gigs, the ability to produce a record as contemporary as Up at the Lake is no mean feat, and one that’s calculated to raise the interest of even the most jaded teen suffering from Pop Idol ennui. Some might say, about bloody time too – Up at the Lake comes nearly two years after their previous release. In the music industry, such a break would have shot a lesser band into the apocalyptic oblivion of daytime TV interviews and the bargain shelf in HMV. But not so The Charlatans. “We just had to recharge our batteries, to find a new direction,” Rogers explains, “but it was worth it – I love the new album, I actually think that it’s the best one we’ve ever done.” During the hiatus, the band embarked on various solo production projects, but mostly they just rested from the gruelling schedule of gigging and recording that had been their lot for the last decade. The Charlatans are lucky, in comparison to most bands, in that they have the luxury of taking a break when they like – having assumed control of much of their own recording and production, the whims of ‘evil corporate giant’ record companies don’t play much part in the band’s life. “Get a day job!” is the advice that Rogers would give to anyone thinking of following in the band’s footsteps. “Record companies aren’t interested in you or in your music, they’re only interested in the money it makes them. They’re all looking for the new Bright Young Things. It sounds clichéd, but you have to do what you want, not what they want.” Perhaps that’s all to easy for a member of one of Britain’s top indie bands to say, but Tony Rogers says it like he means it. His devotion to creating quality music is obvious, and is representative of the rest of the band. “We don’t have a message to get across; we’re not political. To be honest, all we want to do is have fun and to make lots and lots of great music – that’s what The Charlatans are about.” He gives the impression that The Charlatans exist as a musical entity, rather than a collection of individual musicians. “It’s more important to carry on the name of the band – the name itself implies that. In fact, there are only two founding members from ’89 still in the band – I didn’t join until 1997. What we’d all love is for The Charlatans to be playing in 50 or 100 years time, without us of course, but still a group of musicians keeping the flag flying, so to speak.” So what is the best thing about being a member of this open musical collective, as it seems to be? “Waking up in the morning and knowing that I can do whatever the hell I want,” he chuckles. And the worst? He pauses – there can’t be much wrong with being a member of The Charlatans. Finally, “Probably the fact that I’m still single!” he says, bursting into laughter so infectious I can’t help but join in. A charlatan by name, maybe, but a gentleman by nature.ARCHIVE: 1st week TT 2004last_img read more

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Genius: highs and lows

first_imgSince the launch of the brand in 2009, Genius has come a long way, expanding its product range and customer base and becoming one of the UK’s biggest gluten-free brands.However, after the company recalled 25 products for containing gluten, analysts are asking the question; what is next for Genius?British Baker looks back at the highs and lows of Genius- scroll through the timeline below to see the brand’s journey so far.last_img

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Taylor Ward’s walk-off homer gives Angels victory as Mike Scioscia gives up the reins

first_imgPreviousLos Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia talks with the media after a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The Angels’ Taylor Ward, right, celebrates his walk-off two-run home run during the ninth inning of Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Angels manager Mike Scioscia, left, chats with third base coach Dino Ebel before Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Angels starting pitcher Matt Shoemaker delivers a pitch during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Angels manager Mike Scioscia enters the dugout before Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. Scioscia announced following the game that he was stepping down after 19 seasons managing the team. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte celebrates as he rounds the bases after hitting a two-run home run in the first inning during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels’ Jefry Marte is welcomed in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run in the first inning during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani hits a line drive during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels relief pitcher Odrisamer Despaigne, left, looks away after giving up a two-run home run to Oakland Athletics’ Franklin Barreto in the sixth inning during a game at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Oakland Athletics’ Franklin Barreto, center, is welcomed in the dugout after hitting a two-run home run in the sixth inning during a game against the Los Angeles Angels at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia, left, shakes hand of a young fan before a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia shares laugher before a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia stands for the National Anthem before a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia, left, welcomes Mike Trout after he exits the game in the second inning during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Pitcher Matt Shoemaker #52 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim pitches during the first inning of the MLB game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: PItcher Brett Anderson #30 of the Oakland Athletics pitches during the first inning of the MLB game against the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Michael Hermosillo #59 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim runs out an infield single to second base during the third inning of the MLB game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim bats during the first inning of the MLB game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim strikes out swinging as catcher Beau Taylor #46 of the Oakland Athletics looks for the ball during the sixth inning of the MLB game at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. Ohtani struck out swinging. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Shohei Ohtani #17 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim scores as teammate Taylor Ward #3 signals in the background and catcher Beau Taylor #46 of the Oakland Athletics looks on during the ninth inning of the the MLB game at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. The Angels defeated the Athletics 5-4. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Taylor Ward #3 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim jogs to second base past Jed Lowrie #8 of the Oakland Athletics after Ward hit a walk-off home run to left center field during the ninth inning of the the MLB game at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. The Angels defeated the Athletics 5-4. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Taylor Ward #3 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is mobbed by his teammates after hitting a walk-off home run during the ninth inning of the the MLB game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. The Angels defeated the Athletics 5-4. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)The Angels’ Taylor Ward, center, gets doused with sports drink after he hit a walk-off two-run home run during the ninth inning of Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)ANAHEIM, CA – SEPTEMBER 30: Taylor Ward #3 of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim is congratulated by teammate Shohei Ohtani #17 in dugout after Ward hit a walk-off home run during the ninth inning of the the MLB game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium on September 30, 2018 in Anaheim, California. The Angels defeated the Athletics 5-4. (Photo by Victor Decolongon/Getty Images)Los Angeles Angels team celebrate Taylor Ward’s walk-off two-run home run in the ninth inning during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Angels manager Mike Scioscia leaves the dugout after talking with reporters before a baseball game between the Angels and the Oakland Athletics in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018. It is expected that this will be Scioscia’s last game as manager of the Angels. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia hugs an unidentified woman as he leaves the dugout after talking with reporters before a baseball game between the Angels and the Oakland Athletics in Anaheim, Calif., Sunday, Sept. 30, 2018. It is expected that this will be Scioscia’s last game as manager of the Angels. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia gets emotional as he talks about his last game as a manager of the Angels after a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia gets emotional as he talks about his last game as a manager of the Angels after a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia during a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia talks with the media after a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)Los Angeles Angels manager Mike Scioscia talks with the media after a game against the Oakland Athletics at Angel Stadium in Anaheim on Sunday, September 30, 2018. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)The Angels’ Taylor Ward, right, celebrates his walk-off two-run home run during the ninth inning of Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)NextShow Caption1 of 32The Angels’ Taylor Ward, right, celebrates his walk-off two-run home run during the ninth inning of Sunday’s season finale against the Oakland A’s at Angel Stadium. (Photo by Kyusung Gong/Contributing Photographer)ExpandANAHEIM — The Angels’ final victory was a thriller, but one for which Mike Scioscia was taking no credit.On what he knew would be his final day of 19 years managing the Angels, Scioscia allowed three of his coaches to handle everything, while he sat back and watched the team pull out a 5-4 victory over the Oakland A’s on Sunday, with Taylor Ward’s walk-off homer capping a three-run ninth inning.“I had nothing to do with today,” Scioscia said afterward during a press conference in which he made public what had been suspected, that he was stepping down. “Nothing to do with the lineup, nothing to do with the pitching changes. Hence, it’s probably why we won.”Longtime coaches Alfredo Griffin and Dino Ebel managed the first and last thirds of the game, with bench Josh Paul handling the middle. Scioscia, meanwhile, sat casually on a bench in the middle of the dugout, mingling with players, throughout the afternoon.The Angels trailed 4-2 when the ninth inning began. Jefry Marte, who had been responsible for the Angels’ other runs with a first-inning two-run homer, sliced the deficit in half with an RBI double, after a Shohei Ohtani single.Ward then smashed a two-run homer against Chris Hatcher, allowing the Angels to end a disappointing season on a high note.The Angels finished 80-82, the first time in Scioscia’s 19 seasons that they had three straight losing seasons.Matt Shoemaker got the start, his sixth after missing five months with a forearm issue. After allowing two runs – on a Stephen Piscotty homer in the second – Shoemaker finished the season with a 4.94 ERA. He left with the score tied, thanks to Marte’s two-run homer in the first inning.Related Articles Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Angels’ poor pitching spoils an Albert Pujols milestone The A’s took the lead on Franklin Barreto’s two-run homer against Odrisamer Despaigne in the sixth.Both teams pulled several of their more experienced starters throughout the game.Mike Trout hit a flyout in his first at-bat, and then he left the game during the top of the second inning, allowing fans to give him the AL MVP candidate a standing ovation as he jogged to the dugout.Trout finished his season with 39 homers, just missing his second 40-homer season.“I told them, ‘Give me one at-bat and if I hit a homer, I hit a homer,’” Trout said. “I tell you guys, if I try to hit a homer, I get out. I tried to hit a homer and I got out.”center_img Jose Suarez’s rocky start sinks Angels in loss to Astros Angels offense breaks out to split doubleheader with Astros Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Angels’ Mike Trout working on his defense, thanks to Twitter last_img read more

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