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New phosphorus research project for the Maumee Watershed

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Some farm fields in northwest Ohio’s Maumee River watershed have more phosphorus than their crops can use. Called “elevated phosphorus fields,” such fields may be at higher risk of contributing to Lake Erie’s harmful algal blooms.That’s the premise of a new five-year, $5 million study that hopes to learn about those fields and lower that risk by creating new public-private partnerships.Led by Jay Martin, an ecological engineering professor with The Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences (CFAES), the study plans to monitor and manage more than a dozen elevated phosphorus fields, all in the Maumee River watershed.To do the work, the study is partnering with nutrient service providers — consultants who advise farmers on crop and soil matters, such as the types and rates of fertilizer to apply — and some of the farmers they work with. The nutrient service providers are helping find farmers to help with the study; the farmers in turn are allowing their fields to be used as sites for the study.“I’m excited,” said Martin, a faculty member in CFAES’s Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering and a faculty researcher with Ohio State’s Ohio Sea Grant program and the college’s Stone Laboratory. “This is a way that the agricultural community, Ohio State and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers, and nongovernmental organizations can work together to address an important unknown. By doing so, this will improve water quality while supporting agricultural production.”Phosphorus runoff from farm fields is a significant driver of the harmful algal blooms plaguing Lake Erie. The blooms are sometimes toxic, are often many miles wide, and threaten recreation, tourism, drinking water safety and people’s health. The Maumee watershed, which empties into the lake at Toledo, is the lake’s largest source of phosphorus loading.Martin said the study has four main parts: recruit the partner farmers; measure phosphorus runoff on the farmers’ fields; use and evaluate best management practices on the fields — practices aimed at reducing the fields’ phosphorus runoff while also maintaining their yields; and then, by helping form further public-private partnerships, expand the adoption of the practices throughout the watershed.The study includes partners and supporters from CFAES, the Nature Conservancy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS), Ohio State’s Center on Education and Training for Employment, and 12 Ohio agricultural businesses and organizations. USDA’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture is funding the study, which started in September and will run through summer 2023.In 2016, Ohio, Michigan and the Canadian province of Ontario agreed to reduce the phosphorus entering Lake Erie by 40%, with a goal of doing it by the year 2025. Experts think that such a reduction will keep the lake’s blooms at safe levels. Ongoing efforts to meet that goal involve farmers, scientists and agencies, among others.The new study, for its part, is specifically targeting elevated phosphorus fields, which bear that name because, after years of fertilizer or manure applications, they’ve accumulated more phosphorus in their soil than their crops need. The excess doesn’t hurt the crops; the crops just don’t take it up. But sometimes the phosphorus is released from the soil and ends up in Lake Erie, where it contributes to harmful algal blooms.“The hypothesis is that these elevated phosphorus fields contribute disproportionately to nutrient runoff,” Martin said.Until now, however, testing that hypothesis has been difficult. Locating an elevated phosphorus field requires soil test results, and those aren’t public information; they’re often kept only between a farmer and his or her nutrient service provider. The new study is solving that limitation by enlisting those individuals as partners.Martin said that as a first step, a partnering nutrient service provider will invite a farmer to participate in the study. If the farmer is interested, Martin and his colleagues will work with them to determine if the field has the needed characteristics and to make sure the farmer is comfortable with the arrangements. The team will compensate the farmer and nutrient service provider for their time, will pay for implementing and maintaining the management practices, and will keep the farmer’s name and location confidential.If, on the other hand, the farmer isn’t interested, “things end there, and no one finds out anything about their field that they didn’t know before we started,” Martin said.The team is now working to identify the study sites, with a goal of having 14 fields.In the Maumee watershed and in other places, some farmers are reducing their phosphorus runoff by using the “4R” practices. The 4Rs stand for the right source, right rate, right time and right place when it comes to applying fertilizer and manure. But the 4Rs don’t help on an elevated phosphorus field because the farmer has probably already stopped applying additional phosphorus fertilizer.Instead, other best management practices are needed — ones that keep nutrients in the field or that trap them at the edge of the field before they get into waterways.Martin said the study will implement a variety of best management practices at the study sites and then will evaluate the practices using edge-of-field water sampling. The practices may include building wetlands, growing cover crops and installing phosphorus filters, among others. Based on the findings, the study will offer recommendations for farmers and nutrient service providers.The Maumee River watershed covers an area greater than Connecticut: more than 4 million acres in parts of three states — Ohio, Michigan and Indiana. The majority of the watershed’s land use is agriculture. About 12,000 farmers live in the watershed.Other CFAES researchers involved in the study are Margaret Kalcic, Ryan Winston, Mike Brooker and Nathan Stoltzfus of the Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering; Robyn Wilson of the School of Environment and Natural Resources; Greg LaBarge of Ohio State University Extension; and Brian Roe of the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics.Key partners on the study also include Jessica D’Ambrosio of the Nature Conservancy, Kevin King of USDA-ARS’s Soil Drainage Research Unit, the Nutrient Stewardship Council and the Ohio AgriBusiness Association.Collaborating on the study are four northwest Ohio nutrient service providers — Nester Ag, Legacy Farmers Cooperative, Nutrien Ag Solutions, and the Farmers Elevator Grain and Supply Association — and the following organizations: the Ohio Corn & Wheat Growers Association, the Ohio Soybean Council, the Ohio Pork Council, the Ohio Dairy Producers Association, Mercer County Community and Economic Development, and the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation.To learn more about the study, contact Martin at [email protected]last_img read more

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Hemp’s Growing Pains

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorYUMA, Colo. (DTN) — At 35, Bethleen McCall is a lot younger than your typical commodity farmer, but she’s a veteran when it comes to farming hemp in Colorado.McCall is president of the Colorado Hemp Industries Association and she credits the state’s early action allowing regulated hemp production as far back as 2014 for allowing her to start farming where her family once farmed.Last week, McCall was rushing to try to beat a late-week temperature crash and snow, but that didn’t work out so well. She and her employees got about 20% of their crop harvested before the hard freeze. They have now sent away samples to see if the glands in the plant that contain cannabinoids burst during the freeze. Depending on those results, the farm may have just a few days to harvest before the rest of the CBD oil dissipates. Regardless, it’s likely the freeze will bring down the pounds of production and CBD content.Still, the plants held up better than expected in the cold and snow, she said. “We were expecting them to turn to mush; so far they have not.”McCall is a fifth-generation resident of Yuma County who saw her as grandparents and parents slowly lost the ability to farm in the 1980s. She took early jobs working at USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service then worked for 15 years at the Yuma County Conservation District, focusing on irrigation issues. That included trying to help farmers find valuable crops that used less irrigation. McCall recalls one of the crops they studied was kenaf, a fiber crop.McCall credits hemp for allowing her to get back into farming. And generally, McCall noted one of the differences between hemp growers and other crop farmers on the front range of Colorado is age. Most hemp farmers in her area are 40 years old or younger. “A lot of people in my generation are the ones starting this and getting into it,” she said.After the 2014 farm bill opened up hemp production to states willing to test the prospects, McCall and her partner, Mike Sullivan, each were looking at developing a greenhouse operation when they teamed up and built the farm together.“The CBD market took off, and I was able to leave my job and farm full-time now,” McCall said. “You don’t have the opportunity to be on the ground floor of a new business too often.”Yuma County in eastern Colorado has 17 hemp farms and production has exploded statewide to more than 80,000 acres this year. The 2018 farm bill removed hemp as a controlled substance to allow production nationally.The new “deregulatory” environment has created more problems for established growers such as McCall, likely because more people have learned about hemp this year than ever before. That’s actually led to more scrutiny over the business, McCall said.“This year has been a lot harder than in years past,” McCall said. “You have to tell that to people all the time, I am legal. I have more permits and licenses than anyone else.”Payment companies such as Paypal closed accounts for hemp producers earlier this year and froze their accounts for six months. Other merchant services followed. Now, hemp growers such as McCall are being offered merchant services at more than triple the costs they were paying before.“I understand being under a higher level of scrutiny but at some point you can grow hemp like you grow corn and this has got to change,” she said.HOW IT PENCILS OUTStill, hemp right now is worth the regulatory headaches, even with higher production lowering the value of the crop this year. Hemp grown for cannabidiol (CBD) in Colorado has lost more than one-quarter of its value since last year but still averages more than $50,000 per acre. The math breaks down like this: An acre, on average, will produce roughly 1,740 pounds of plants, but the dried flower weight breaks about 3/4 a pound, or about 1,305 pounds. CBD is on average about 10% of the biomass. CBD is now valued at about $3.90 per point (it averaged $5 per point last year). At a 10% average, that equals $39 a pound. Total pounds of 1,305 X $39 = $50,895 per acre.The per-acre value climbs with higher-quality hemp that can produce more CBD oil. McCall noted some better plant varieties can produce 15% CBD oil, and the best varieties are often grown indoors to avoid pollination and can hit about 18%.WAITING ON USDAWhile the farm bill opened up the potential for hemp production nationally, it still requires USDA rules that the Trump administration right now has not completed. The interim final rule for USDA’s hemp production program has been at the White House Office of Management and Budget since June 27, the longest of any current USDA regulatory action under review at the White House. The department had intended to have its rules out sometime in August. https://www.reginfo.gov/…Farmers in some states have to wait until USDA is done with its rules before they can test the market. Iowa is among a dozen states that enacted legislation to allow hemp but did not get crops planted in 2019. Iowa officials are waiting until USDA approves its plan for regulating hemp before allowing production, but USDA will not approve state plans until its regulations are finalized. An official with the Iowa Department of Agriculture & Land Stewardship noted THC-testing protocol remains in limbo right now, and Iowa is waiting to see if USDA specifies how testing must be done.Other states just started to dabble with hemp production this year. Bill Achord, who heads the Nebraska Hemp Association, noted the state only approved 10 growing licenses for 2019 even though 176 farmers applied. New regulations are expected in Nebraska to open up the state to more production in 2020, Achord said.Four states remain outliers without any hemp-production legislation: Idaho, Mississippi, New Hampshire and South Dakota.EMERGING INDUSTRY WITH STRONG GROWTH POTENTIALNationally, hemp acreage was projected at 511,442 acres with 16,877 grower licenses across 34 states by the “U.S. Hemp Report,” put together by an organization Vote Hemp. But Vote Hemp also states less than half the licensed acreage, around 230,000 acres, is actually planted. Then roughly half of that will be lost or determined as noncompliant, so about 115,000 to 138,000 acres will be harvested. Vote Hemp surveys state departments of agriculture annually on hemp acreage. https://www.votehemp.com/…As an emerging industry, hemp is a little bit of the Wild West, including seed sales. A Kentucky company, Elemental Processing, just last month sued an Oregon company, HP Farms, for $44 million for selling 6.4 million seeds that were supposed to be female with a high germination rate. Elemental Processing distributed the seed to farmers, but reported that as much as 70% of the seeds were male. The Kentucky crop was destroyed to avoid pollinating other area hemp crops.Strong growth is expected to continue in the CBD market for the next five years, at least, according to the Colorado firm BDS Analytics. It forecasts CBD sales, which were $1.9 billion in 2018, will grow to $20 billion by 2024. The group noted, though, that growth of the CBD market will depend heavily on how FDA decides to regulate CBD in areas such as food and beverages.With so much focus on hemp right now, McCall said she remains worried about how the FDA will look at CBD products in years to come.“I don’t want my products to be in a dispensary. I want my products to be on a Whole Foods shelf.”The big regulatory fear remains just how USDA oversees the chemicals that separate hemp from its close cousin, marijuana. Under the farm bill, hemp is allowed to have, on a dry weight basis, 0.3% of Delta-9 tetrahydricannabinal (THC), the chemical that produces intoxication in marijuana. In comparison, marijuana grown and sold legally in Colorado may have a THC content somewhere around 18% to 20%. It’s a challenge to keep a hemp crop from going above that 0.3% level at harvest.Sunny Summers, cannabis policy coordinator at the Oregon Department of Agriculture, said the problem can come down to testing the right form of THC. The farm bill limits Delta-9 THC, but there are other forms of THC in cannabis plants that can be converted to Delta-9 when the plant is heated. Some types of lab equipment used for testing can change the number during testing itself, Summers said. Oregon uses a cold-testing method that can highlight Delta-9 without generating higher levels of other forms of THC.“There is a lot going on there about the type of THC we’re talking about and when do you sample the plants,” Summers said.Oregon, like Colorado, jumped into the business early and has more than 1,900 farmers growing about 63,000 acres this year.While the program rules are not complete, USDA is planning to offer a hemp policy in 2020 as part of Whole-Farm Revenue Protection policies. The plan will come with at least two caveats: hemp with THC above the compliance level will not be covered as a loss and hemp will not qualify for replanting payments.GROWER DIFFICULTIESStates have different sampling dates. Oregon tests 28 days prior to harvest. Kentucky tests two weeks prior to harvest, while Colorado samples in a 10-day window around harvest. Some states require testing every field, every year while others do random sampling.“Those are all contributing factors why transporting from one state to another is difficult,” Summers said. “Plus, if you are drying the plant that will reduce moisture content, so what tested legal in the field will have a completely different value if you test it after it’s dried.”Interstate transportation remains a huge concern, McCall noted. Truckers hauling hemp can find themselves spending several nights in jail while state and local officials try to sort out the legality of hemp. States without legal hemp, such as Idaho and South Dakota have had cases this year of truckers arrested for hauling hemp through their states. Yet, McCall said, “Under the farm bill, if you are approved through your state program, you have been cleared. Too many people don’t understand that yet.”Pollen drift also is a challenge. Producers try to control and limit seeds in the field and destroy male plants, but McCall notes that hemp pollen on the Front Range can drift for several miles. So if one farmer isn’t controlling their male plants, it can cause problems for other producers in the area. Growers are trying to coordinate to ensure they grow only feminized seed or clones from female plants to avoid pollination. “We know it’s going to happen, it’s just a matter of time,” McCall said.Chris Clayton can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(BAS/CZ/SK)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Collected: Topic-Based Feeds Delivered

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#start If your job requires you to have your finger on the pulse of an industry, then you should take note. Curated feed community Collected offers users a great option for aggregating the latest info from their favorite sites. First developed by Stockholm-based new media agency Great Works, Collected aggregates feeds from blogs, YouTube, Twitter, Flickr and Friendfeed and allows you to create fast web-based collections. Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts In our upcoming report The Real-Time Web and Its Future, we describe Collected as “a reverse Tumblr or Posterous, for OPML files.” While some users choose to connect their own identities or create entertaining collections like Ashton Kutcher’s NFL Tweets, we see this as a great opportunity for professional bloggers and journalists. Collected lets you streamline your news in manageable subject-specific collections. As we note in our report, “Collected is one of an increasing number of stream reader services we’re seeing that don’t offer a “river of news” view, [instead] it forces you to look at collections one at a time.” Coupled with the fact that the site offers a clean blog-like interface, Collected makes for a great discovery experience. Similar to how Lazyfeed lets users search topic-specific feeds, Collected allows you to search collections to find new feeds and like-minded community members. Users then “favorite” each other to follow each others’ collections. Collected’s new mobile site allows you to view collections on the go. If you’re tired of cleaning up your regular feeds and you’re too impatient to wait for an adaptive news reader application like Parse.ly, then Collected just might be your answer. For more info on Collected register at Collected.info or order our upcoming report below. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… dana oshiro 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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Seamless Transition Committee: A Model for Providing Coordinated Care

first_imgJay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhDCreative Commons [Flickr, Veteran, October 4, 2008]Veterans returning from combat deployment who are seeking health care can be faced with complicated treatment plans. One Veteran’s Affairs health care center has implemented a “Seamless Transition Committee (STC)” which allows for complex cases to be presented to a multi-disciplinary team for feedback and coordination of care. The STC is composed of leaders from a wide range of disciplines and includes: the chief psychologist; program managers; the suicide prevention coordinator; and the medical director of the Post-Deployment Primary Care Clinic. In a typical case, the STC team members would discuss the case background, establish treatment priorities, and agree to treatment recommendations. Review meetings are scheduled for one hour each week at the same time and location.Results of the program evaluation conducted by Mallen, Schumacher, Leskela, Thuras, and Frenzel [1] suggest that this is a promising model. Over the 3 year study, 149 veteran’s cases were reviewed by the Seamless Transition Committee. Over 50% of the veterans in the STC program had at least 3 mental health diagnoses. The most common diagnoses included: (1) Depressive disorders (77.2%); (2) PTSD (62.4%); (3) Substance abuse (56.4%); (4) Anxiety disorder (44.3%); and (5) Personality disorder (20.1%). Over 40% of the veterans in the program were psychiatric inpatients at some time and over 60% participated in the facility’s Psychiatry Partial Hospitalization program (PPH).A pre/post study analysis was conducted. Significant changes in service utilization were noted, including a significant decline in psychiatric hospitalization rates. Overall:Visits to mental health clinics increased.PPH utilization remained approximately the same.Inpatient psychiatric hospitalization rates declined from 24.7% to 8.2%.There were no significant changes in emergency room or primary care utilization rates.The researchers noted that as veterans’ cases were presented at the STC, the veterans utilized outpatient services more often and used inpatient services less. The results of a staff survey indicated that the staff believed that veterans’ care was improved. These changes were attributed to expedited care received through the STC. The STC might provide a good model for other systems of care that wish to enhance collaboration among specialists, and provide more efficient care to patients.References[1] Mallen, M., Schumacher, M., Leskela, J., Thuras, P., & Frenzel, M. (2014). Providing coordinated care to veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan wars with complex psychological and social issues in a department of veterans affairs medical center: Formation of seamless transition committee. Professional Psychology-Research and Practice, 45(6), 410-415. doi:10.1037/a0037755This post was written by Jay Morse & Heidi Radunovich, PhD, members of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

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8 Things High Performing Sales Organizations Do

first_imgHere are 8 observations about high performing sales organizations:Manage with Proper Metrics – High performing sales forces use a proper balance of activity metrics, outcome metrics, and financial metrics to measure results. They aren’t too heavy on lagging indicators, and they don’t believe activity tells the whole story.Use a Dynamic, Agile Sales Process – The highest performing sales forces have the ability to make decisions inside a structured sales process that changes to match accelerating, disruptive change. They are focused on outcomes, not inflexible rules.Create a Coaching Culture – The sales team members receive formal and informal coaching as the primary method to grow and develop their mindsets and skill sets. Everyone gets coaching, regardless of their level or tenure.Create Compelling, Differentiated Value – Ability to apply and execute company strategy and knows how to create compelling, differentiated value for their clients. They create a strong preference for themselves and their solution.Accountability for Results – Every team member is accountable for producing results and has a clear direction on what those results are, as well as the strategy for their attainment. The sales leaderships holds their sales force accountable, and they are accountable to their sales force in arming them to succeed.Build a Hunter’s Culture – High Performing Sales Organizations have a hunter culture that reinforces and rewards opportunity creation and opportunity capture. No one ever closes anything that they don’t first open. High performing sales organizations focus on creating opportunities.Peer and Trusted Advisor Role – High performing sales organizations focus on developing the sales force to possess the business acumen and situational knowledge of a peer and the ability to deliver tailored insights to their clients and prospects.Have a Cadence – The best sales forces use as regular, disciplined meeting cadence that includes a mix of short term and long term goals and KPIs. They practice territory and account reviews, pipeline reviews, opportunity reviews, and sales call plans and reviews.last_img read more

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CBI books Nabam Hari, brother of ex-Arunachal CM Nabam Tuki, others on corruption charges

first_imgThe CBI has booked Nabam Hari, brother of former Arunachal Pradesh Chief Minister Nabam Tuki, his wife and PWD officers for alleged corruption in government contracts, officials said on Friday. The case pertains to contracts handed by Mr. Tuki as the PWD minister in the State to his kith and kin for “selfish gains without inviting tenders”, the CBI has alleged. The Central Bureau of Investigation had carried out a preliminary enquiry, on the orders of the Gauhati High Court, into one such work related to construction of a Kendriya Vidyalaya building in Umroi cantonment, Shillong, the officials said.It is alleged that several contracts were given to Mary Associate, a firm owned by Mr. Tuki’s sister-in-law, Nabam Mary, which was maintaining a current account in the United Bank of India in which her husband Nabam Hari is one of the nominee. The contracts were given between 2005-07, the officials said.last_img read more

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I’m not obsessed, but I deserve Ballon d’Or – Ronaldo

first_imgCristiano Ronaldo says he deserves to win the Ballon d’Or for a sixth time, over rivals including Antoine Griezmann, Luka Modric, Kylian Mbappe and Lionel Messi.Ronaldo and Messi have won the award five times each over the last decade, but the duo faces stronger competition in 2018 than for many years.Griezmann and Mbappe have a World Cup win on their records, while Modric claimed the Golden Ball at Russia 2018 for his star performances in Croatia’s run to the final. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Man Utd ready to spend big on Sancho and Haaland in January Who is Marcus Thuram? Lilian’s son who is top of the Bundesliga with Borussia Monchengladbach Brazil, beware! Messi and Argentina out for revenge after Copa controversy Best player in MLS? Zlatan wasn’t even the best player in LA! Ronaldo helped fire Real Madrid to a third consecutive Champions League crown before joining Juventus and he is in no doubt he should win the Ballon d’Or for a record-breaking sixth time.”I said many times, winning a sixth Ballon d’Or is not an obsession,” Ronaldo said in a France Football interview . “And I do not ask the question in these terms.”I already know, in my heart, that I am one of the best players in history. Of course, I want to win, this sixth Ballon d’Or!”It would be a lie to tell you the opposite. I work for that. As I work to score goals and win games without being an obsession. The Ballon d’Or, yes, I think I deserve it.”Ronaldo completed a £99m ($127) move to Juventus from Madrid during the summer transfer window, which ended his trophy-laden nine-year spell with the club.The Portuguese superstar has thrived during his first few months in Turin, scoring seven goals in 12 matches across all competitions, most recently netting a brace against Empoli on Saturday .Madrid meanwhile, have dropped seven points behind arch-rivals Barcelona in La Liga without their all-time record goalscorer, after losing 5-1 against the Spanish champions on Sunday.last_img read more

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Firefighters Contain Blaze In Oceanside Apartment

Firefighters Contain Blaze In Oceanside Apartment

first_img KUSI Newsroom, KUSI Newsroom Posted: February 24, 2019 February 24, 2019 OCEANSIDE (KUSI) – Firefighters in Oceanside knocked down a fire at a small apartment building in Oceanside today. More than two dozen fire personnel — including five engines — fromthe Oceanside Fire Department responded to a 9:46 a.m. call in the 300 block of South Ditmar Street, two blocks east of South Coast Highway.The first engine to arrive found smoke coming from the four-apartment building, as firefighters made their way inside and located the blaze in a bedroom. The arriving crew contained the fire while subsequent crews hurried to evacuate the rest of the building.Their efforts likely prevented the building’s other residents from being displaced, Battalion Chief Scott G. Stein said.“It was a very good, coordinated, aggressive attack,” he said. One of the apartments’ residents suffered minor injuries but declined transport to the hospital. Authorities have not determined the exact cause of the fire. Firefighters Contain Blaze In Oceanside Apartment Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

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