Tag: 闵行mm自荐

Flexible working requests for all: are you prepared?

first_img Comments are closed. All employees have the right to request flexible working from 30 June 2014 XpertHR is conducting a short benchmarking survey on the impact of the extension of the right to request flexible working to all employees, which comes into effect on 30 June 2014.The survey looks at employer awareness of the extension of the right to make flexible working requests, and the changes employers are making to flexible working policies in preparation. We also want to find out how many of your employees currently work flexibly, and the number of flexible working requests you have received and granted over the past year.Completing this brief survey will entitle you to:Take part in the survey nowa complimentary copy of the data report on the survey findings, as soon as it is published; anda free copy of the report on the 2013 XpertHR survey on flexible working arrangements, which will be emailed to you on completion of the survey.In addition, all respondents whose data can be used in the XpertHR survey analysis will be entered into a prize draw for the chance to win £1,000. The closing date for the prize draw is 30 June 2014, and the winner will be notified by email during w/c 21 July 2014.Flexible working survey closing date: Friday 16 May 2014. Related posts: Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img Flexible working requests for all: are you prepared?By Michael Carty on 2 May 2014 in Personnel Today Features list 2021 – submitting content to Personnel TodayOn this page you will find details of how to submit content to Personnel Today. We do not publish a…last_img read more

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What’s it worth?

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of Georgia You may have heard that the U.S. dollar is either weak or strong. But what does this mean, really?”It’s all relative,” said Don Shurley, an agricultural economist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The ExchangeBeing weaker or stronger is about how much of a country’s currency you can buy using another country’s currency at any time, relative to what you could buy at a previous time.Take the U.S. dollar, for example. How many Japanese yens or Pakistani rupees can you get for a single U.S. dollar? On Oct. 28, you could’ve gotten about 59 Pakistani rupees or 123 yens for 1 U.S. dollar.This is called the exchange rate. And it changes all the time, 24 hours a day.How are exchange rates decided? The short answer, Shurley said, is good old supply and demand.Piece of the ActionSay the U.S. economy is strong and the return on investment looks good in the United States. In this scenario, foreign investors want a piece of the action. But they have to have U.S. dollars to invest or to do business here.These investors might pay more, using their currency, for the U.S. dollars they need to make the investments. They then take their country’s currency and convert it into U.S. dollars.”When they put their money into U.S. dollars, it drives the dollar value up relative to their country’s currency,” Shurley said. It works both ways. U.S. investors investing in other countries affect the value of those countries’ currencies compared to the U.S. dollar.Strong DollarThe U.S. dollar has been said to be strong over the past few years. So, what’s better? A strong or weak U.S. dollar?A strong U.S. dollar can buy more of another country’s currency and products in the United States. A U.S. citizen can buy more in another country on vacation.But, remember. It’s relative.The strong U.S. dollar also makes it harder for other countries’ citizens to vacation in the United States and to buy U.S. products in their markets. This can hurt parts of the U.S. economy.Weak PricesFor example, the strong U.S. dollar is one reason cotton prices have been so low for U.S. farmers in recent years. It has also hurt the nation’s textile industry, which turns cotton into shirts, jeans and other clothes.The strong U.S. dollar, according to the National Cotton Council, has made it hard for U.S.-made textile items to compete in foreign markets. And it has allowed cheaper foreign-made textiles to dominate the U.S. market.So, the American textile industry has shrunk over the past few years. It can no longer handle the amount of cotton it used to, Shurley said.In 1997, U.S. textile firms could economically make enough clothes and cotton items to use about 11 million bales of cotton. In 1999, that dropped to 10 million. This year, they will need only about 7.5 million.As a result, U.S. cotton farmers have to sell their cotton abroad. This year, U.S. farmers will grow about 18 million bales of cotton. (A bale is about 480 pounds of lint.) Of this, about 11 million will have to be exported, he said.But to compete on the world market, U.S. exporters have to drop their prices to compete, sometimes below what it cost to grow the crop in the United States.It’s been reported that the dollar weakened over the summer. This could affect the U.S. economy, the world economy, cotton farmers and you. But we’ll have to wait and see. It’s all relative.last_img read more

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What Does Comcast-Time Warner Merger Mean for Cablevision and Newsday?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Consolidation is coming to the American cable television industry, but what that portends for the future of Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp. and their subsidiary, Newsday, is far from clear.Earlier this year Comcast, the largest cable company in the country, announced its intention to buy Time Warner Cable, the nation’s second-largest cable company, for $45 billion, in a deal that still requires federal approval. The announcement fueled speculation that the other big cable operators, including Cablevision, which is reportedly the fourth-largest in the business with its 3 million subscribers, could be up for grabs. And if another company gobbled up Cablevision, would it retain or unload Newsday, which it acquired in 2008 from the Tribune Company for $650 million? With the Dolan family’s backing, Long Island’s lone daily newspaper has survived the downslide of the digital age, but it’s hard to tell if that would continue under new ownership.Certainly, cable, not newspapers, is where all the acquisition action is these days.“We have the financial flexibility to chase a few more rabbits,” John Malone, the billionaire investor whose holding company, Liberty Media, is Charter Communication’s largest stockholder, told Bloomberg News, referring to Charter’s bid for Time Warner Cable that it lost to Comcast.Some industry analysts thought his comment meant that Cablevision was suddenly in the cross-hairs because Charter’s current chief executive, Thomas Rutledge, had once been a top dog at Cablevision until he resigned in December 2011 after not seeing eye to eye with Cablevision’s grand poobah, James Dolan. But, Malone had told Bloomberg in October that he didn’t see Cablevision as a merger target because it didn’t have room left to grow in the pay-TV households of Long Island.Wall Street analysts agree.“Relative to other operators, Cablevision suffers the worst of both worlds,” media analyst Craig Moffett wrote in a November report for Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., an investment research firm he then worked for. “Its starting penetration is already almost double its peers, making it harder to gain and easier to lose.”If anyone outside the Dolan family knew the ins and outs of Cablevision, it would be Rutledge, asserted some analysts willing to dismiss any bad blood lingering between him and Dolan. The Cablevision scion himself added to the speculation when he gave a rare interview to The Wall Street Journal last summer when he refused to say whether the Dolans would still own the company two decades from now.“You can’t rule out the possibility of a sale,” he admitted.But, a big development in the cable industry last week significantly changes the dynamic, analysts say. On April 28, Charter and Comcast agreed on a deal that would let Charter pick up some 3 million subscribers that Comcast wants to divest while swapping its subscribers in areas of the country Charter prefers not to serve. Assuming the merger passes muster with the U.S. Department of Justice as well as the Federal Communications Commission, Charter would become dominant in the Midwest and Comcast Time Warner Cable would become dominant on both Coasts.Just as importantly, Charter would become the second-largest cable company in the country behind Comcast, which would have 30 million subscribers, or about 30 percent of the cable industry. The prospect of one media entity wielding that much control doesn’t sit well with consumer advocates—or with U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who criticized the merger at recent Senate committee hearings, calling it “a disaster.”“We’ve been opposed to the Comcast Time Warner deal since it was announced,” said Harold Feld, senior vice president at Public Knowledge, a non-profit, pro-consumer group based in Washington, D.C. “Adding Charter into the mix has not made it any prettier from our perspective.”But the new deals suggest that Cablevision is off the table—for now.“Charter is not going to be in a position to make a big acquisition,” Feld told the Press. “Charter will need to take some time absorbing [Comcast’s subscribers] and restructuring before they could even think about acquiring somebody else.”Industry analyst Craig Moffett, now at his own firm, MoffettNathanson LLC, put it this way: “The question used to be whether Cablevision is for sale. The question now is who would be the buyer?” Moffett told the Press.“Comcast is restricted,” he said. “They’re selling subscribers to fit under the FCC’s ceiling. Time Warner Cable is out of the picture. Charter is divesting the last of its presence on the East Coast. I think at this point it would be hard to find a buyer.”The prospects for Charter buying Cablevision definitely “took a hit,” according to Lance Vitanza, managing director and partner at CRT Capital Group, based in Stamford, Conn.“If you thought a Cablevision deal was going to happen in the near term, now the timing is going to be pushed off,” he told the Press. “Charter is certainly not going to do another deal in the midst of doing this deal.”A Cablevision representative declined to comment.BATTLE OF THE BROADBANDWhat’s been driving the cable industry to consolidate is the desire to gain leverage over the networks, content producers and program providers in order to stifle rising prices for retransmission and carrying fees.It was a dispute over higher fees charged by the Fox Network that had led to Cablevision imposing a service blackout for two weeks in October 2010, which generated a class action lawsuit that is still winding its way through the federal justice system. In a similar scuffle last fall, Time Warner Cable blacked out the CBS network and its related channels, like Showtime, for almost a month in a dispute over how much it was paying for their programs and then had to concede defeat as the NFL football season began. As Time Warner Cable’s chairman and chief executive, Glenn Britt, told The New York Times, “We certainly didn’t get everything we wanted.”Dolan had told the Journal last August that Cablevision’s position in the New York metropolitan market “helps us have more leverage than our size would dictate,” when it comes to pushing back against content providers’ strong-arm tactics to raise programming prices. But, he added that “there could come a day” when his company decides to drop TV and shift to broadband as its main offering.“We are going to continue to do the right things for the shareholders,” he told the Journal.“Cablevision has generally had the problem that the Dolan family has often been at odds with other investors,” said Feld, of Public Knowledge. “They have a good, compact market but they have never been successful at finding a good way to expand.”An industry analyst based in the New York metropolitan area who spoke on background explained the skepticism prevailing on Wall Street regarding Cablevision’s James Dolan, who announced at the beginning of April that he was naming himself chief executive officer, his wife Kristin Dolan the new chief operating officer and Brian Sweeney the new president.“For years there’s been a positive and a negative in Cablevision stock,” the investment expert told the Press. “The positive is that somebody someday is going to consolidate Manhattan and Long Island. But not anymore. Not for a very long time.“The negative has always been called ‘The Jimmy Discount,’” the analyst continued. “People hate him. He’s not a great manager and he does stupid things. I think he bought Newsday with as much forethought as he bought Clearview Cinemas and the Whiz. I don’t think he ever gave a shit about journalism. But I think there are tax reasons why Newsday will hang on as part of Cablevision for a while to come.”Last July, when Newsday announced that publisher Fred Groser was going to retire at the year’s end, New York Post media columnist Keith J. Kelly reported that his pending departure sparked “renewed speculation that parent Cablevision is readying the Long Island paper for a sale…” As it turned out, Kelly was wrong, but the rumors persist, fueled in March when Gordon McLeod was named publisher—the third one in the six years since the $4.4-billion cable operator bought Newsday.Asked about the stubborn scuttlebutt that the Long Island tabloid is again on the auction block, Newsday deferred to Cablevision.“As a matter of long-standing policy, we do not comment on rumors or speculation in the media,” a Cablevision spokeswoman said.In its recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Cablevision reported that Newsday had suffered almost $150 million in operating losses over the last three years: $71.1 million in 2013, $47 million in 2012 and $31.7 million in 2011. According to Newsday’s most recent filing with the Alliance for Audited Media, the paper’s total average print circulation was approximately 255,000 on weekdays, about 251,000 on Saturdays and 313,000 on Sundays, representing a decline of a 6.4 percent, 5.3 percent and 5.6 percent, respectively, compared to a comparable period the year before.“You simply can’t take a cable company and a newspaper and expect them to play nicely together,” says Jaci Clement, the director of the nonprofit Fair Media Council, an LI media watchdog group. “The philosophies are different. The products are different. The cultures are different.”She said Cablevision’s ownership of Newsday has been a “lose-lose-lose situation” for the Island.“Newsday is treated like an addition, not as an integral part of the operation,” she said. “[It] has been diminished from being one of the best metro papers in the country… The public has no diversity in the news offered by Newsday and News12…. Cablevision financially supported a candidate that Newsday endorsed yet Newsday repeatedly failed to disclose Cablevision’s contributions. Journalistically, that’s so bad it’s off the charts.”But with Verizon FiOS a distant competitor—same goes for satellite TV—Cablevision is firmly in the driver’s seat and Long Islanders are just along for the ride.last_img read more

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Tuesday September 24th Local Sports

first_imgClass A1. West Hancock (4-0), LW #1 @ #9 Garrigan2. Saint Ansgar (4-0), LW #2 @ Nashua-Plainfield3. North Tama (4-0), LW #3 vs East Buchanan4. Westwood (Sloan) (4-0), LW #6 @ Logan-Magnolia5. Wapsie Valley (3-1), LW #5 @ South Winneshiek6. Grundy Center (4-0), LW #8 vs GMG (Garwin)7. BGM (Brooklyn ) (4-0), LW #7 vs Highland (Riverside)8. South O’Brien (4-0), LW #10 @ HMS (Hartley)9. Algona Garrigan (3-1), LW #9 vs #1 West Hancock10.MFL MarMac (4-0), LW (X) vs Clayton Ridge ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The Minnesota Wild are aiming to return to the playoffs after a rocky season followed by the firing of general manager Paul Fenton, who was replaced by Bill Guerin. Realizing the scant external expectations for their success in the rugged Western Conference, the Wild have brought an extra edge to the ice this fall because of it. The return from injury by Mikko Koivu and Matt Dumba ought to provide a boost as well. The Wild start the regular season Oct. 3 at Nashville. Class 2A1. Waukon (4-0), LW #1 @ #10 Monticello2. Clear Lake (4-0), LW #2 @ Hampton-Dumont3. Algona (4-0), LW #3 @ Garner-Hayfield-Ventura4. Waterloo Columbus (4-0), LW #6 vs Oelwein5. Des Moines Christian (4-0), LW #5 @ Centerville6. Greene County (4-0), LW #7 @ Shenandoah7. Benton (4-0), LW #8 vs Union (LaPorte City)8. OABCIG (4-0), LW #10 vs Red Oak9. Crestwood (2-2), LW #4 vs Iowa Falls-Alden10.Monticello (4-0), LW (X) vs #1 Waukon AMES — Iowa State quarterback Brock Purdy has been named the Big 12 Offensive Player of the Week. Purdy set a school record with 510 yards of total offense in a 72-20 win over Louisiana-Monroe after turning the ball over on the Cyclones’ first two possessions.That’s Iowa State coach Matt Campbell who has been impressed with Purdy’s ability to handle adversity.Campbell says running back Johnnie Lange and safety Greg Eisworth should be able to play at Baylor after getting injured on Saturday. Kene Nwangwu is questionable with lingering soreness.Baylor coach Matt Ruhle will know a lot more about his team after Saturday’s Big 12 opener against Iowa State. The Bears are 3-0 but all three wins have come against inferior opponents.Ruhle says Iowa State’s Brock Purdy has become a complete quarterback.Ruhle says the Bears need to find a way to score enough against the Cyclone defense.Kickoff at Baylor on Saturday is scheduled for 2:30 DES MOINES — Radio Iowa High School Football Poll — SEPTEMBER 23, 2019Class 4A1. WDM Valley (4-0), LW #2 vs CB Thomas Jefferson2. Dowling Catholic (3-1), LW #4 @ #8 Ankeny3. Cedar Falls (4-0), LW #5 vs Dubuque Hempstead4. Bettendorf (3-1), LW #3 @ CR Washington5. Cedar Rapids Kennedy (3-1), LW #6 @ Davenport West6. Ankeny Centennial (3-1), LW #1 @ Marshalltown7. Southeast Polk (3-1), LW #7 @ #9 Fort Dodge8. Ankeny (2-2), LW #8 vs #2 Dowling Catholic9. Fort Dodge (4-0), LW #9 vs #7 S.E. Polk10.Waterloo West (3-1), LW #10 vs CR Jeffersoncenter_img Eight-man1. Don Bosco (4-0), LW #1 vs Tripoli2. Turkey Valley (4-0), LW #2 vs Central City3. Remsen St. Mary’s (4-0), LW #4 vs AR-WE-VA4. Coon Rapids-Bayard (4-0), LW #5 vs West Harrison5. Audubon (4-1), LW #6 vs Boyer Valley6. Lenox (5-0), LW #8 vs Mormon Trail7. Montezuma (4-0), LW (X) @ Lone Tree8. Harris-Lake Park (4-0), LW #9 @ West Bend-Mallard9. Newell-Fonda (3-0), LW #10 vs River Valley10.New London (4-0), LW #3 @ HLV Class 3A1. Western Dubuque (4-0), LW #1 @ Dubuque Wahlert2. Solon (4-0), LW #2 vs Fort Madison3. Cedar Rapids Xavier (4-0), LW #3 vs Muscatine4. Lewis Central (4-0), LW #5 vs Creston/O-M5. Dallas Center-Grimes (3-1), LW (X) vs Perry6. North Scott (3-1), LW #4 vs Central DeWitt7. Sergeant Bluff-Luton (3-1), LW #7 vs Sioux City Heelan8. Washington (4-0), LW #8 vs Keokuk9. Independence (4-0), LW (X) @ Independence10.Norwalk (3-1), LW (X) vs Carlisle Class 1A1. West Sioux (4-0), LW #1 @ Sibley-Ocheyedan2. Dike-New Hartford (4-0), LW #2 vs North Linn3. Van Meter (4-0), LW #3 vs ACGC4. West Branch (4-0), LW #4 vs Bellevue5. West Lyon (4-0), LW #5 @ Emmetsburg6. South Central Calhoun (4-0), LW #6 vs Ogden7. Western Christian (4-0), LW #7 vs Unity Christian8. Iowa City Regina (3-1), LW (X) @ East Marshall9. Mounty Ayr (4-0), LW #9 vs West Central Valley10.Treynor (4-0), LW #10 @ East Sac Countylast_img read more

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