Tag: 上海水磨会所

Temperature whiplash as cold returns to Northeast, coastal storm brings heavy rain

first_imgABC News(NEW YORK) — It’s a temperature whiplash, from record cold this week, to mild weather Friday, then back into the freezer Saturday as millions experience a temperature roller-coaster.We start out mild for most of the Eastern U.S. Friday, with every major city above freezing in the Midwest. Even Minneapolis and Chicago will be near 40 degrees, with 50 degree temps from Kansas City to New York City and Boston.Then a dose of Arctic air is aimed at the Northeast for Saturday. Temperatures will plummet below freezing again, and with wind it will feel like it’s again in the single digits, with teens and 20s from Boston to New York and even Washington, D.C.Meanwhile, a coastal storm will be developing Friday in the Carolinas with heavy rain stretching from Georgia to North Carolina. Gusty winds up to 65 mph are possible and some areas could see up to 4-6″ of rain, with localized flash flooding possible.By Saturday evening, the storm system will slowly crawl near the Carolina coast, continuing to bring very heavy rain and gusty winds. Flash flooding will be possible in the coastal Carolinas.Then by Sunday late afternoon and into the evening hours, the coastal storm will really strengthen off the Virginia coast and will bring gusty winds and rain from the coastal Mid-Atlantic to eastern New England.Northeast cities that will see this nasty weather will include Philadelphia, New York and Boston.Further inland, from the Poconos to the Catskills and into higher elevations of eastern New England, some of the rain could freeze on contact and become freezing rain, which will produce treacherous road conditions Sunday night.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Soccer’s versatile beauty

first_imgA few years ago, two Harvard humanities professors created one ingenious class.“The Global Game: Soccer, Politics, and Popular Culture,” or “Romance Studies 109,” isn’t simply about admiring the world’s most popular sport — it’s also a window onto some of the most pressing questions posed by the humanities.“The point is to use soccer as a portal, as an entryway into the disciplines but also the questions that the humanities propose about the production of social meaning,” said Mariano Siskind, the John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Humanities and a scholar of 19th- and 20th-century Latin American literature. “What is beauty, and why is it called the beautiful game? That’s a central question in aesthetic philosophy.“We need to shake students up,” he added, “in the way that Russian formalist Viktor Shklovsky asked them to ‘defamiliarize’ the objects they take for granted.”The course’s co-creator, Francesco Erspamer, is a professor of Romance languages and literatures, and, like Siskind, a lifelong soccer fan.If students lack a foundation in critical analysis, “when they become leaders or prominent people they will just be repeating or simply adhering to situations instead of being innovative change-makers,” Erspamer said. “This space is where you learn to be courageous, to go beyond yourself, to take some intellectual risks.”The class grew out a friendship between the professors that began on the soccer field during weekly games and deepened over frank conversations about the challenges facing the humanities. In the last decade, colleges and universities across the United States have struggled to attract students to arts and humanities concentrations, with more undergrads gravitating toward STEM fields: science, technology, engineering, and math.To help to reverse the trend, Harvard administrators in 2013 released a trio of detailed reports on the humanities that recommended new College offerings, including humanities framework courses, now part of the curriculum, that focus on three areas of learning: the art of listening, the art of reading, and the art of looking.Siskind and Erspamer’s one-semester class debuted in spring 2012, but anticipated the reports’ findings in the belief that the study of the humanities hones critical thinking, analysis, and interpretation.Harvard administrators were thrilled with the new offering. Students were thrilled, too. The professors had to switch classrooms twice to accommodate the more than 100 students who signed up.One look at the syllabus dispels any notion that “The Global Game” is merely a chance to argue about whether Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo is the best player in the world. Class participation is key, as are weekly response papers to the hefty assigned readings, and a midterm and final exam. Course materials are not in the least restricted to sport, instead leaping from the French philosopher Michel Foucault to the cultural anthropologist Richard Shweder to the Russian literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin.“They are key texts of humanities inquiry about the production of space and subjectivity, about aesthetic philosophy, about history or popular culture in the Middle Ages,” Siskind said.Class discussions are just as wide-ranging and demanding. One recent conversation explored how different cultures relate to soccer, including the ways fans in certain countries mock or insult players.“Should we change significant cultural practices in one place because audiences are watching it from another part in the world and are offended by it? Some said yes,” said Erspamer. The ensuing discussion, he added, “Turned into a debate over the ethics of representation in the context of global cultural difference.”In another session, students examined how contemporary celebrity culture elevates elite athletes to cult-like status and the ways fans often project their own fears and aspirations onto stars.“That’s the surface of a phenomenon that is much larger and deeper,” and dates to the Greek notion of the tragic hero, said Siskind. “We use Sophocles’ tragedies and several concepts from Aristotle’s ‘Poetics,’ with special emphasis on the idea of ‘catharsis,’ and try to make sense of the rise and fall of Diego Maradona, one of the best players in the history of the game, famous for his exploits and scandals on and off the pitch.”Like many of his classmates, James Clarke ’16 brought a soccer-centric mind-set to the first gathering. “To be totally honest, the idea of taking a class from professors who mix business and pleasure really made me smile,” said Clarke, a government concentrator and soccer fan. But examining challenging coursework through a new lens has helped him grapple with important questions about the human experience, he said. “It’s a really fascinating course.”No less so for Zoe Kessler ’17, whose passion for the game, a product in part of playing competitively in high school, has gained “even more meaning” through the course’s engagement with timeless questions linked to the humanities.The class has included visits by special guests. On a recent Wednesday afternoon, students jammed Fong Auditorium to hear from former U.S. men’s soccer star Landon Donovan, who discussed how cultural attitudes differ from country to country, as well as soccer’s struggle to gain a professional foothold in America.But the question that resonated most in the room of high-achieving students had to do with disappointment: What was it like to be cut from the national team just weeks before the 2014 World Cup?Fittingly, Donovan’s answer touched on a topic many argue the arts and humanities are perfectly suited to engage: compassion.“It was the first time in my life that I had not made a team, that I had not been chosen,” he said. “I finally had compassion for people that didn’t get everything all the time and that is much, much, much more valuable than having gone to Brazil and playing in a World Cup.” He got a round of applause.Fun is part of the curriculum, too. At the end of each class, Erspamer and Siskind bring students to the Cesarini zone, named for the Argentine-Italian soccer player from the 1930s famous for scoring miraculous goals in the waning minutes of matches. “It’s a quirky moment in the class, we have fun thinking about the game in a more relaxed, loose, fun way,” said Erspamer.Lessons from the day’s lecture invariably work their way in. One recent Cesarini zone followed a class discussion about dictatorship and democracy and how soccer can be co-opted by politics. The professors asked students to weigh in on whether World Cup wins should be considered legitimate if the country that took home the trophy did so under dubious political circumstances. A spirited debate ensued.An upcoming end-of-class conversation will tackle how goal celebrations have risen to an individual art form, buoyed by mass media and the selfie generation.Erspamer and Siskind realize that they may not win many converts to the humanities with “The Global Game,” but they are convinced they have planted an important seed of intellectual inquiry.“It’s a way of learning to see a certain complexity that is directly related to art and to philosophy and to discourse and narrative,” said Erspamer. “And it’s learning to see things that are familiar and therefore invisible.”And sometimes, he said, an encounter with grace and beauty is the payoff. The first five minutes of the first class began with a video clip of the former French superstar Zinedine Zidane faking out his opponents with balletic ease. The clip ended with a quote from the German philosopher Immanuel Kant. (“Everyone has his own taste,” it begins. “But the beautiful stands on quite a different footing.”)“The idea is that you see that Zidane doing tricks even when he doesn’t need to do a trick,” said Erspamer. “It’s not to show off. It’s simply because he is trying something.”He added, “Art is the space where you try new things; experimentation is central to aesthetics and the humanities. Just like the most compelling artists, great soccer players push the boundaries of what’s known.”last_img read more

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One thing to change: Think more like children

first_img Harvard astronomer Loeb caught up in the thrill of the search Tweaking the universe Related Far-out questions Planck satellite findings bring Big Bang’s aftermath into crisper focus, astrophysicist says The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.center_img This is part of a series called Focal Point, in which we ask a range of Harvard faculty members to answer the same question.Focal PointAbraham “Avi” LoebQuestion: What is one thing wrong with the world that you would change, and why?The one thing I would change about the world is to transform my colleagues in academia to kids all over again, so they would follow the sincere path of learning about the world.We are born innocent and humble, wondering about the world around us and trying to figure it out, initially without even having a language to express our findings. There is no bigger privilege to being alive than this learning experience. As kids, we tolerate mistakes and take risks because these are inseparable from the process of expanding our knowledge base. These aspects make most childhoods exciting and authentic.But somewhere along the way, when some of these same kids join academia and are accorded the privilege of tenure, they lose the traits of childhood innocence and unbounded curiosity. As senior professors, they can get attached to their egos and navigate in directions that maximize awards, honors, and affiliation with prestigious societies or organizations. To enhance their reputations, tenured professors often tend to create “echo chambers” of students and postdocs who study theses with references to their papers and conference contributions. The loud echo amplifies the mentor’s influence in the academic community. “There is no bigger privilege to being alive than this learning experience.” Is there anything wrong in this progression from childhood curiosity to academic fame? By chasing self-interest, we often lose track of the real goal of academic pursuit: learning about the world. This conflict is apparent when the popular view advocated by authority is not aligned with the truth.One inevitably makes mistakes and takes risks when exploring the unknown. Even Albert Einstein argued, toward the end of his career, for the lack of “spooky action at a distance” in quantum mechanics, and against the existence of black holes and gravitational waves. We now know from experiments that those assertions were wrong. But the benefit of science is that we learn by making mistakes. If we will not allow ourselves to venture into the unknown, by assuming that the future will always resemble the past based on our gut feelings, we will never make discoveries.Research can be a self-fulfilling prophecy. By forecasting what we expect to find and using new data to justify prejudice, we will avoid creating new realities. Innovation demands risk-taking, sometimes contrary to our best academic instincts of enhancing our image within our community of scholars. Learning means giving a higher priority to the world around you than to yourself. Without the humble attitude of a child, innovation slows down and the efficiency of the academic pursuit of the truth grinds to a halt. We all become static museum items rather than dynamic innovators.As Galileo reasoned after looking through his telescope, “in the sciences, the authority of a thousand is not worth as much as the humble reasoning of a single individual.” I would add the footnote that sometimes Mother Nature is kinder to innovative ideas than people are. When we study the world, there is a lot to worry about. But at the same time, there is a famous quote by Nachman of Breslov: “The whole world is nothing but a very narrow bridge, and the key is not to be fearful at all.”The fundamental purpose of tenure is to enable individuals to take risks and venture into unexplored territories of knowledge without concern for the security of their jobs. Honors should be merely makeup on the face of academia, but they sometimes become an obsession.Despite the notion that is often advanced by textbooks, our knowledge should be regarded as a small island in a vast ocean of ignorance. The most efficient way to add landmass to this island is by not being afraid of the consequences of originality, by being dedicated to the thrill of finding the truth irrespective of whether it boosts our ego or reputation as tenured professors.We live for such a short period of time on one small planet out of a hundred-quintillion other habitable planets in the observable volume of the Universe. Let us not pretend that we are so special. Let us maintain some cosmic modesty and study the world sincerely, just like kids.— Abraham “Avi” LoebFrank B. Baird Jr. Professor of ScienceChair, Astronomy DepartmentNext week: Lisa Randall explains why pedestrians make cities more collaborative. Harvard researchers see alien potential in mysterious object Something weird this way comeslast_img read more

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CENTSEC 2014 Kicks-Off in Guatemala

first_img I like reading news and more. Guatemalan Army General Israel Ortiz Ruiz, Chief of Defense of Guatemala, preceeded Gen. Kelly, saying: “We have come together here to discuss ways to combat this scourge that has been planted in the core of our societies [drugs], becoming a phenomenon that produces other evils. That’s why it’s so important that everyone is here at this conference, willing to contribute your best efforts to achieve our objectives.” According to high-ranking participants at CENTSEC 2014 who spoke with Diálogo, transnational organized crime poses a threat and a challenge to the political and economic stability for all countries in this region, and Operation Martillo, at its core and central point, is a crucial and informative campaign against illicit trafficking. But Gen. Kelly insisted that, even with all the successes obtained by these efforts, “we cannot rest because our adversaries, the narcotraffickers, do not rest. Martillo has been a success because of one reason: your participation and your partnership.” And he concluded: “Many countries represented in this conference today are suffering terribly because of the drug demand in the United States, and because of our inability to deal with this demand, and that’s why we will work with anyone who will partner with us trying to deal with this crime, the drugs, and what it does to our societies.” On March 12, during a patrol in the western Caribbean, crewmembers aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Tampa detected a suspicious go-fast vessel moving at a high rate of speed in international waters. A Customs and Border Patrol Maritime Patrol aircraft provided oversight of the suspected vessel and the Tampa’s onboard helicopter launched to pursue the vessel. Upon arriving on scene, the helicopter crew fired warning shots effectively stopping the vessel. A U. S. Coast Guard boarding team subsequently boarded the vessel and discovered 695 packages hidden inside the vessel’s hull which later tested positive for cocaine. The estimated wholesale value of the approximately 1,500 pounds of cocaine is $23 million in the U. S. This interdiction was part of Operation Martillo (Hammer), which is one component in the United States government’s whole-of-government approach to countering the use of the Central American littorals as transshipment routes for illicit drugs, weapons, and cash. Operation Martillo is an international operation focused on sharing information and bringing together air, land, and maritime assets from the U.S. Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, and Western Hemisphere and European partner nation agencies to counter illicit trafficking. It’s also the theme for this year’s Central American Security Conference IX (CENTSEC 2014). By Dialogo April 01, 2014 The conference is a venue to provide Central American Defense chiefs and the commander of U. S. Southern Command a forum to discuss issues and future strategy for Operation Martillo and to counter illicit trafficking activities in the region. And that’s why representatives of the armed and security forces from Belize, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, and the United States gathered in Guatemala City, from April 01 to 03. The three-day event is co-sponsored by U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) in collaboration with Guatemala and the theme of this year’s CENTSEC is Operation Martillo Lessons Learned and Way Ahead. “Operation Martillo efforts started in January 2012, when Central America, South America, the Caribbean, and other Western Hemisphere and European nations joined the United States to try to curtail illicit trafficking. The intention is to disrupt organized crime operations, especially on both coasts of the Central American isthmus. The numbers show that Operation Martillo has been very successful and a true transregional effort,” said General John Kelly, SOUTHCOM commander in his opening remarks. In his opinion, this year’s CENTSEC will help to shape the future of Operation Martillo and the domestic narratives of the participant countries. last_img read more

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Serie A clubs set to resume training on May 4

first_img Many of them travelled home during the quarantine and will have to return to Italy and will therefore be in quarantine for 14 days. Italian Football Federation (FIGC) president Gabriele Gravina hopes for a return to Serie A on May 2. Read Also: Ex-Liverpool star and daughter in hospital after car crash La Gazzetta dello Sport also reveals that Juventus trio Paulo Dybala, Blaise Matuidi and Daniele Rugani are still in quarantine after testing positive for coronavirus. Fiorentina, Sampdoria and Hellas Verona have also reported cases of coronavirus in their squads. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Serie A could resume training sessions on May 4, according to La Gazzetta dello Sport, with three hypotheses to help conclude the campaign in July. The newspaper claims Serie A are planning to follow the German Bundesliga and resume training, initially with social distancing and gradually return to normal. Promoted ContentInsane 3D Spraying Skills Turn In Incredible Street ArtThe Best Cars Of All Time6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneThese Are India’s 7 Most Stunning ModelsWho’s The Best Car Manufacturer Of All Time?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreTop 8 Best Looking US First Ladies EverBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWho Earns More Than Ronaldo? Loading… The three hypothetic dates mentioned for the possible resumption are May 24, May 31 or June 7, with six and a half weeks outlined to finish the remaining 13 fixtures of the campaign. It would mean that Serie A would be concluded by the beginning or in the middle of July. FIFA has opened for the possibility to extend the contracts beyond June 30 and indicated they are doing all they can to conclude the season, but the biggest problem remains the players.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Half-time: QPR 0 Tottenham 0

first_imgJulio Cesar’s double save after five minutes meant QPR made it to the interval on level terms at Loftus Road.The Brazilian dived to his right to tip Jermain Defoe’s shot onto the post and then did brilliantly to keep out Emmanuel Adebayor’s follow-up.At the other end, Shaun Wright-Phillips had a sight of goal but saw his effort deflect wide off Michael Dawson.Wright-Phillips also sent a weak shot wide of the near post after neatly evading two challenges.Tottenham were forced to make a 24th-minute change when Sando limped off after an awkward fall and was replaced by Scott Parker.QPR (4-4-1-1): Cesar; Onuoha, Nelsen, Hill, Fabio; Derry; Mackie, Mbia, Park, Wright-Phillips; Taarabt.Subs: Green, Ferdinand, Ben Haim, Cisse, Faurlin, Bothroyd, Campbell. Click here for our QPR v Tottenham 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Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Half-time: Fulham 0 Chelsea 0

first_imgFernando Torres had Chelsea’s best chances as the west London derby remained goalless at half-time.The Spaniard, making his first league start in over a month in place of Samuel Eto’o, pounced on a mistake by Maarten Stekelenburg and fizzed a shot just wide of the far post before testing the Fulham keeper again with a volley just before the break.Whites midfielder Steve Sidwell sliced an effort that wasn’t far off the target moments earlier, as a much improved Fulham enjoyed the better of the opening period.On-loan forward Clint Dempsey, making his final appearance before returning to Seattle Sounders, also went close for Fulham when he headed wide from Pajtim Kasami’s cross early on.But the Whites lost captain Brede Hangeland just 15 minutes into the game after he appeared to clash heads with team-mate Kieran Richardson, forcing the Norwegian to be replaced by Dan Burn.New Fulham boss Felix Magath dropped Lewis Holtby to the bench, despite the German impressing since joining on loan from Tottenham, and restored Darren Bent, Kasami and Dempsey to the starting line-up.Meanwhile, Blues manager Jose Mourinho handed starts to Ramires and Andre Schurrle, as well as Torres, all of whom featured in the midweek Champions League stalemate with Galatasaray.Fulham: Stekelenburg; Riether, Hangeland, Heitinga, Richardson; Dejagah, Parker, Sidwell, Dempsey; Kasami, Bent. Subs: Stockdale, Riise, Burn, Kvist, Holtby, Karagounis, Rodallega. Chelsea: Cech; Ivanovic, Cahill, Terry, Azpilicueta; Ramires, Matic; Schurrle, Oscar, Hazard; Torres. Subs: Schwarzer, Cole, Luiz, Mikel, Lampard, Willian, Ba.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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SABC, Government pledge support for South African music industry

first_img11 September 2015At the opening of the 12th Moshito Music Conference and Exhibition at the SABC, Auckland Park on Thursday 10 September 2015, venue hosts SABC and Moshito partners the Department of Arts and Culture assured delegates of their continuing support in helping initiatives like Moshito in developing and curating South African music.Celebrating the legacy of SA music #fromkwelatohop & not forgetting our fallen heroes #TheGreatSouthAfricanSongbook pic.twitter.com/HrultThKBX— #Moshito2015 (@moshito_music) September 9, 2015Moshito Music Conference chairperson Sipho Sithole welcomed guests, delegates and visitors to the conference, saying that the Moshito ideal was to make the event a “premier destination for music makers and the music business” not only for Africa, but for the world. This year the conference has invited music business representatives and musicians from as far as China, Brazil and Jamaica to share and exchange ideas on how to strengthen the business as a viable commodity in the digital age.Chairperson of #Moshito2015 Mr Sipho Sithole opens the conference with a brief historical background and emphasizes it’s capacity to accomodate members of the entertainment industry #TheBusinessofMusicPosted by Moshito Otswela Pele on Thursday, September 10, 2015Sithole said that in the 12 years the conference had been running, Moshito has achieved a reputation as being the “most admired local event for music business engagement”, and that the three-year relationship the conference has built with the Department of Arts and Culture has only strengthened that credibility.In explaining this year’s conference theme, “From Kwela to Hop”, Sithole said Moshito wants to highlight the respect paid to South African music of the past, and how that respect informs and guides the music of the present and future. “South Africa,” he said, “wants to be known for a variety of genres: this variety defines who we are as a country.” But the conference, he said, pointing to the selection of musical showcases and collaborations with international artists to be held during the event, was not just about talking about music, but also an opportunity to feel, see and hear the power of South African music.#Moshito2015 Mr Matlala took the floor emphasizing the importance of the conference and exhibition #TheBusinessofMusic #TheGreatSouthAfricanSongbook #FromKwelatoHopPosted by Moshito Otswela Pele on Thursday, September 10, 2015In some words of support for the conference, SABC Group CEO Frans Matlala welcomed Moshito to the SABC venue, calling the event a pivotal instrument in promoting music across Africa, saying it was “fundamental in preserving South African culture.” He requested that Moshito do its part in telling the South African story to the world. Matlala hoped, as the success of Moshito grew, that the power of music would bring the rest of the world back to Africa. Matlala was confident this year’s event would be the best one yet, pledging that Moshito would always have a home at the SABC.SABC COO Hlaudi Motsoeneng reiterated that commitment, praising Moshito for “doing well to stand by local artists.” He did, however, urge the music business in general to find a way to bring the various organisations that dealt with finances and support systems of the music industry under one umbrella organisation to insure a holistic philosophy to deal with the challenges of the industry. One of those challenges is the payment of music royalties to songwriters and artists, and Motsoeneng announced that after long negotiations with the industry, the SABC would commit to paying outstanding royalties to the sum of R100 million to local artists.“We want to make sure the money reaches the right people,” he said. Motsoeneng welcomed Moshito and its visitors to the SABC, saying the event’s philosophy “reminds us of where we come from, as well as where we, as a nation, are going.” The SABC is committed to adding more of that history, the legacy and the works of some of the country’s greatest music artists past and present, to all radio and television programming.Motsoeneng concluded by urging all music lovers to be active in that curation of culture by paying TV licences, the money from which goes back into promoting that culture to more South African, the African continent and the rest of the world.Representing the Minister of Arts and Culture, Deputy Director General of the department Monica Newton praised Moshito for changing the cultural landscape of the country over its 12 year existence. “It gives me a warm feeling in my heart that events like this do so much for nation building,” Newton said, adding that the Moshito organisation did well with dealing with the trials and tribulations of the music industry on behalf of the artists and music lovers in general, highlighting the challenges faced by the industry like piracy and technology changes. Newton added that it was important to create a living heritage of the arts in South Africa, respecting and honouring the legends of the past, using the lessons learnt from that to help guide and grow local musical culture into the future.“Music,” Newton said, “was a canary in a coalmine for society, a way to measure and negotiate the cultural landscape,” adding that the department’s partnership with Moshito was a pleasure and privilege to be part of. Newton concluded in wishing the event success and hoped it would become the foremost collaborator with both local artists and in its growing international friendships, “the people of Moshito have done a lot of hard work in strengthening the music business, and we wish them well for the future.”Lemmy “Special” Mabaso @EmileYX & Chachi Carvalho took us on a journey #FromKwelatoHop #Moshito2015 #AfroWorldNight pic.twitter.com/oQYHDgx2nE— #Moshito2015 (@moshito_music) September 10, 2015The Moshito Conference and Exhibition includes discussions on various aspects of the music industry in both local and international contexts, as well as looking at trends and changes that touch both the business and artistic development. Seminars include music branding, archiving of musical legacy, changes in digital musical technology, song writing and exploring new markets for music.In between the seminars, visitors and delegates will be entertained by various public performances at the exhibition at the SABC’s Radio Park venue, as well as at some of Johannesburg’s legendary music venues.The Kwaito & Hiphop discussion seeks to unpack the messages & context behind these genres #Moshito ^KM pic.twitter.com/hEnkeLeH07— City of Joburg (@CityofJoburgZA) September 10, 2015The exhibition marquee showcases a range of top industry goods,service providers and organisations #Moshito2015 …Posted by Moshito Otswela Pele on Thursday, September 10, 2015The conference will culminate with a special concert titled “The Great South African Song Book” on Saturday, 12 September at Newtown Park featuring an all- star collection of some of South Africa’s best music artists, including Arthur, Judith Sephuma, Mzwakhe Mbuli and Cortina Whiplash.The beautiful songtress Ms Judith Sephuma took over the night as she graced the #Moshito2015 Afro World Night with her…Posted by Moshito Otswela Pele on Thursday, September 10, 2015last_img read more

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Pumaren thinks also-ran UE ‘could’ve done more’

first_imgUE beat UST, 96-91, to register its first victory in the tournament and won two more games in a span of three playing days to get to 3-7 and make itself a Final Four threat.The Red Warriors’ chances, though, went down the drain when the Tamaraws gave them third straight loss.“Despite the odds we’ve faced, we don’t have an import, my players gave it their all,” said Pumaren in Filipino. And as Pumaren and the Red Warriors prepare to bid adieu to their season, he can’t help but have a soft spot for his burly forward Pasaol.UE’s talisman produced the highest-scoring individual performance in recent memory when he dropped 49 points in their 106-100 loss to defending champion De La Salle. ADVERTISEMENT For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. View comments QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding The longer Brownlee stays in PH, the more he feels at home MOST READ But despite making noise, Pumaren said the Red Warriors could’ve done more after getting booted out of Final Four contention on Sunday.“I think we could’ve done more, we could’ve done better with the way we played,” said Pumaren Sunday after losing to Far Eastern University, 79-63.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“But I’m actually proud with how the boys played.”The Red Warriors walked out of Smart Araneta Coliseum with a 3-10 record, but they had their moments. Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Nextcenter_img LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. UE head coach Derrick Pumaren. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netUniversity of the East has been one of the most surprising teams in the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament.From “Manong” Derrick Pumaren’s flashy outfits, to Alvin Pasaol’s scoring exploits and the Red Warriors’ late resurgence, UE has produced a lot of fireworks this year.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 UAAP Season 80 Preview: UE Red Warriors PLAY LIST 02:56UAAP Season 80 Preview: UE Red Warriors03:43UAAP Season 80 Preview: FEU Tamaraws00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA “Of course there’s Alvin’s 49 points, I’m proud with the way he played because his true potential came out this season and I personally recruited him,” said Pumaren.  Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillionlast_img read more

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