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A Focus on Diversified Operations During Upcoming Farm Management Tour

first_img Facebook Twitter By Andy Eubank – Jun 12, 2018 Home Indiana Agriculture News A Focus on Diversified Operations During Upcoming Farm Management Tour A Focus on Diversified Operations During Upcoming Farm Management Tour SHARE Facebook Twitter Previous articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for June 12, 2018Next article2018 Purdue Farm Management Tour Preview and Welcome Weekend Rains on the Tuesday Morning Edition Andy Eubank SHARE 2018-FMT-previewDiversification in a farming operation will be a focal point of the 2018 Purdue Farm Management Tour in Johnson and Shelby Counties this month. This is the 85th tour and Jim Mintert from the Purdue Center for Commercial agriculture says it should be helpful for other operators to see the innovative operations on this tour that are improving their bottom lines through diversification.“One of the challenges facing everybody in Indiana agriculture is tight margins, and we’re looking for ways to improve those margins,” he explained. “One of the ways is to think about diversifying and try to engage in production of a specialty crop that potentially offers the opportunity to earn a higher margin with maybe a little higher level of management. So, that will be one of the focuses of several of the tour stops, and I think it will be very interesting and very helpful for people to hear what those folks have to say.”The farms on the tour are located in a part of the state that has some diverse ground too.“Part of that region is some prairie soils, but a lot of it of course is not, with a little bit of rolling nature to it. We’ve got some wooded areas, and we’ve got some particularly when you get into Shelby County some opportunities for livestock production. We’ll be featuring that on the Douglas farm. They’ve been a long-time pork producer that have made some significant evolutions in terms of how they produce pork and in particular the partnership that they have with the Legan family.”The tour starts Thursday afternoon, June 21 with stops at the Danny & Judy Gill Farm and then Norton Farms, both near Franklin in Johnson County. That night the 2018 Master Farmer Awards Dinner is also in Franklin at 6:30 p.m. at the Beeson Hall Special Event Facility.Then Friday, June 22, Douglas Farms near Flat Rock will host the tour in the morning, followed by a stop at Fischers Food Grade & Fischer Inc. near Shelbyville.  Complimentary lunch will be served there and Dr. Chris Hurt will provide his updated agricultural outlook. The Farm Management Tour is free, but you are asked to pre-register to ensure an accurate meal count. Register at this link.For the Master Farmer dinner, advance registration is required and the cost to attend is $25. Pre-register no later than June 13 to attend. The registration information for the Master Farmer dinner is here.last_img read more

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Government urged to scrap property tax in virus crisis

first_img WhatsApp Previous articleIHF call for all commercial rates to be waivedNext articlePressure on Council to revamp Oldtown pitch in Letterkenny News Highland Pinterest Twitter Google+ Pinterest Google+ Facebook AudioHomepage BannerNews Government urged to scrap property tax in virus crisis A Donegal County Councillor is calling on the Government to scrap property tax in a bid to ease pressures during the current crisis.Cllr Micheál Choilm Mac Giolla Easbuig says so many families and individuals are facing so much uncertainty and the government could reduce some of the financial burden by scrap the property tax.He believes there’s too much of a focus on how best to support business during these times with little attention being paid to homeowners:Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/mdfgdfgdfgichtax.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 center_img Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Twitter WhatsApp DL Debate – 24/05/21 Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Harps come back to win in Waterford Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – March 20, 2020 last_img read more

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Southern Breweries Win Big At GABF

first_imgWinning is so over rated. I mean, who wants a medal or a trophy that says to the world, “I’m the best at FILL IN THE BLANK”? That’s just ostentatious.I feel like I’ve earned the right to say that, because I’ve never won anything in my life. Not even those school superlatives. In an informal poll my senior year, I had a real shot at winning “Most Likely to Drop Out of College,” but for a while it looked like I wasn’t even going to go to college, so my name was unceremoniously removed from the contest. Because I grew up in the ‘90s when they gave awards out to everybody who bothered to show up, I have a box full of “participation” medals, but none that I actually won.So yeah, winners are lame.And yet, I can’t help but get really excited when the winners of the Great American Beer Festival are announced. This is the biggest craft beer contest in the world, and most American breweries are represented, each submitting beers they’re proud of in specific styles. There was a time when the festival was dominated by West Coast breweries and a few progressive Midwestern shops, but I’m happy to say that the Southern Appalachians represented pretty well this year (the GABF was held last week in Denver).A number of our finest breweries pulled in some beautiful hard wear, but there are three winning beers that I think everyone should seek out if they have the opportunity.Hardywood Park’s Raspberry Stout. This Richmond brewery pulled big boy gold in the fruit beer category. Word on the street is their Raspberry Stout is worth its weight in, well, gold.Pisgah Brewing Chocolatized Vortex II. The limited release of this imperial stout has reached feverish levels in Asheville, and it earned a gold for Chocolate Beer at GABF.Monday Night Brewing Bourbon Barrel Drafty Kilt. I can’t imagine the big hitters that Monday Night went up against to win gold in the Bourbon Barrel Aged Beer category. Some of the most sought after beers in the country fall into this category. And this year, Monday Night, out of Atlanta, has the gold standard.The biggest round of congratulations in our region has to go to Virginia’s Devils Backbone, which won four individual medals (including a gold for their Schwartz Bier) and the biggest award of all: Midsize Brewing Company of the Year. That’s their third consecutive national title for Devils Backbone at GABF. Obviously, these dudes are on a roll. It’s enough to make me change my stance on winners.last_img read more

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Quick Hits: Too Risky?

first_imgPenn State dissolves its Outing Club, citing safety concerns.The college years. Parties and beers, right? But if you were a suburbanite like me in 2002 and chose a college for its access to the outdoors, those years exploded with new experiences that had nothing to do with classes or parties. I explored the state forest bordering Penn State University, organized trips through the Outing Club, and gained many of the skills that help me professionally and personally today.The Penn State Outing Club, the nation’s third oldest university outing club, has long been an organization through which students hone leadership traits and outdoor skills. PSOC has built trails, maintained gear for community rental, and adapted to student interest over the years.Those experiences are now a thing of the past.On April 2, 2018, PSOC was informed that “its activities exceed the University’s acceptable risk level,” according to club treasurer Timothy Hackett. After a risk assessment of 79 club sports, the university found the three outdoor recreation clubs (including the Nittany Grotto caving club and the Nittany Divers SCUBA club) exceedingly risky. The 98-year-old organization would be “dissolved at the end of the semester.”Students were not allowed to see the risk assessment, but university spokeswoman Lisa Powers reports that “impact of activity, typical impact force, [and] severity and frequency of participant injury” were evaluated. The university also says that in December 2016, some students “expressed concerns related to the misuse of alcohol… in the context of already risky activities” but has not specified in which clubs or how often this occurred.Can Students Lead?If Penn State found its student-led organizations to be too risky, it would make sense to see other Blue Ridge colleges and universities moving in the same direction. In reality, though, a minority of universities have entirely staff-run outdoor recreation programs.Many other student-run groups coexist with universities’ staff-led offerings. The University of Virginia has a staff-run Outdoor Adventure program which offers guided trips and rental gear. Meanwhile, the student-led Outdoors at UVA club allows dues-paying members to go on trips or borrow gear for free.There are also universities where students lead all outdoor programming. Dartmouth Outing Club, the nation’s oldest, is entirely student-run with some staff oversight. Eric Ramsey, Associate Dean for Student Life at Dartmouth, supports the student-run model in part because “Outdoor education is fundamentally about the experience of immediate consequences related to decision-making: if you get your sleeping bag wet, you will be cold.” PSOC officers have also pointed out that student-led trips are more affordable than guided trips and build a community centered on personal growth instead of single experiences.Risky BusinessWhile renowned for its wilderness travel courses, the National Outdoor Leadership School is also a risk consultant for schools and nonprofits. “We try to help other programs manage the risks of operating in remote places, on both the proactive and response end of things,” says Katie Baum Mettenbrink, a NOLS Risk Services manager. These organizations turn to NOLS to make sure their programs survive, both literally in bringing home all the participants and in not meeting financial ruin via lawsuit. “We have not seen anything to suggest that student leaders are incapable outdoor risk managers,” Mettenbrink says, but she recommends leader training in three areas:1) Leadership Skills: Leadership skills include group dynamics, logistics, and managing risk proactively. Most university clubs require workshops on these topics before students lead trips. PSOC’s leadership training program was being rebuilt at the time of the risk review.2) Outdoor Skills: These “hard skills” are particular to each sport. Backpackers must know how to throw a bear bag, for example. In my PSOC days, student leaders had to master skills in a workshop before leading trips.3) Responding to Emergencies: Mettenbrink says “College/university programs we’ve worked with require leaders to complete a 16-hour Wilderness First Aid (WFA) course for day and weekend trips.” Penn State met those requirements, and the Outing Club says many leaders had “superseding certifications, such as Wilderness First Responder, Swift Water Rescue, and/or Emergency Medical Technician.”Déjà VuWhen I entered Penn State, PSOC leaders underwent training in all above topics. We offered rental equipment, published a trip schedule in our own magazine, and submitted all trip proposals to our university-appointed advisor.In 2005, as campus recreation programs were coming into vogue, a risk management review similar to that in 2017 decided PSOC shouldn’t be managing technical gear like climbing ropes and PFDs. A newly created, staff-led Outdoor Adventures program took over the gear, and thereafter PSOC was housed under Club Sports where trips would require approval both by the club advisor and university staff. Current Outing Club leaders say their new trip paperwork “was designed and intended for typical organized sporting events, such as a wrestling tournament or track meet.”In spring 2017, the university finally realized that club sports needed different procedures from outdoor clubs. It moved oversight to the Outdoor Adventures program created twelve years earlier. PSOC officers say new requirements “helped to bring the Outing Club closer to national standards,” and the group ran twelve trips under this model.The club’s disbanding surprised students who had worked with Outdoor Adventures for fifteen months to revise safety procedures. Penn State has conceded that, in addition to perceived risk, “The amount of oversight required for the volume of trips that certain groups wanted to take was not sustainable by our Outdoor Adventures staff.” According to PSOC, the university claimed that both organizations were a “duplication of resources.” The students are eager for more training and even more paperwork, but the university isn’t willing to make that a possibility.Petitions supporting PSOC have received over 22,000 signatures. The story has been covered in the media over 150 times, and 300 concerned alumni co-wrote a letter to the University’s president. The alumni letter got a prompt response from the Vice-President for Student Affairs. Alumnus Nick Clabbers says he is “cautiously optimistic” that upper administration understands the value of student-led outings. For now, PSOCers must only go on staff-led, more expensive Outdoor Adventures trips, but they are allowed to meet indoors. “We will continue to have meetings, host professional, and student speakers, and continue trail maintenance events,” says Hackett.It’s not the experience I had, though, and they deserve better.last_img read more

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‘Bent Bob’s’ legacy

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Road warriors

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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COVID-19: Central Java tracking down 1,500 residents who attended Gowa gathering

first_imgThe Central Java administration has formed a team to track down approximately 1,500 Central Java residents who attended a mass religious gathering in Gowa, South Sulawesi, following the emergence of a COVID-19 cluster in Brebes regency.On Wednesday, 16 residents of Brebes who had, in March, attended an international tabligh (Islamic mass gathering) in Gowa regency, South Sulawesi, tested positive for COVID-19.Several other cities and regencies in Central Java have reported that people who had participated in the gathering had contracted the virus. ”I’m afraid there will be a new COVID-19 cluster from the attendees of the Gowa gathering,” Central Java Governor Ganjar Pranowo said on Thursday.He called on residents who had attended the gathering to report to authorities for testing.“Please help us by reporting to authorities. Don’t be afraid; we won’t scold you. Instead, we will treat you – if you are confirmed positive for the coronavirus – to protect your families and others from transmission [of the virus],” Ganjar said. Ganjar has also asked the Tegal city administration to create its own special team because of the city’s proximity to Brebes.He asked the community group Jogo Tonggo (neighbors looking after each other) to report if they found any of the gathering’s attendees in their records.As of Thursday, Central Java had confirmed 904 cases of COVID-19 and 64 deaths. (aly)Topics :last_img read more

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NBA free agency: Could Lakers’ persistence on LeBron James & Carmelo Anthony pay off?

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Yet, the Lakers view James and Anthony as their top priority for a simple reason. Just as they feel relatively more optimistic about securing Anthony than before their meeting, the Lakers likely believe a meeting with Paul could then ensure a personal meeting with James. Then, the Lakers could sell their vision to James about collaborating together to win more championships. Incidentally, the Lakers unexpectedly made a blockbuster move on the Fourth of July in 2012 by acquiring Nash, though that move backfired the past two seasons amid persisting injuries. The rest of the Lakers’ offseason plans hinge on where James and Anthony go. Yet, the Lakers are still expressing interest in other candidates and outlined contingency plans for both scenarios. Kupchak visited with Lakers forward Pau Gasol on Tuesday. But Gasol reportedly has sparked interest from San Antonio, Miami, Oklahoma City, Chicago and Golden State. The Lakers reached out to nearly all of their free agents, including Jodie Meeks, Nick Young, Kent Bazemore, Jordan Farmar, Xavier Henry, Jordan Hill, Chris Kaman, and Wesley Johnson. But it took only a day for Meeks to agree to a three-year deal worth $19 million with Detroit, and only four days for Kaman to agree to a two-year deal worth $10 million with Portland. Bazemore has meetings scheduled with San Antonio next Tuesday and Boston next Wednesday. Still, the Lakers have mainly focused on casting their line on James and Anthony. Even if neither chomp on the Lakers’ bait, it appears unlikely they would devote that same amount of money to other free agents. The Lakers have stayed mindful about savings for the next superstar, whether it becomes Kevin Love in 2015 or Kevin Durant in 2016. For now, the Lakers have put aside that money for James and Anthony, a proposition that improved in part because of the Lakers’ determination to make their sales pitch. Even if it requires a cross-country flight near a holiday weekend. center_img Before the sounds of snaps, crackles and pops spread across this country, the Lakers hoped to set off their own fireworks. Shortly after the Lakers hosted a 2½-hour meeting for New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony at the team’s practice facility in El Segundo on Thursday, general manager Mitch Kupchak and senior vice president of business operations Tim Harris reportedly flew to Cleveland later that evening to meet with LeBron James’ agent on Friday.The trip remains so secretive and unexpected that even high-ranking Lakers officials said they were unaware of the itinerary. Still, the Lakers’ plan to meet with James’ agent, Rich Paul, represents how the organization has left nothing unturned to convince James, Anthony, or even both, to wear the purple and gold. The Lakers remain mindful their efforts may not work. James may have just opted out of his contract with the Miami Heat so the team could have more flexibility to revamp its roster. Although Lakers officials were left pleased with Anthony’s reception toward their sales pitch, one source familiar with what was discussed in the meeting said Anthony offered no indications whether he would sign with the Lakers and when he would make his decision.Anthony has also talked with Chicago, Dallas, Houston and New York, which can offer him a five-year deal worth $129.1 million. All other teams can sign Anthony to a maximum four-year deal worth $95.9 million, though the Lakers and Mavericks have more cap space than the Rockets and Bulls. But with Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash, Robert Sacre and Julius Randle on the roster, the Lakers already have devoted $37 million toward next season’s $63 million salary cap. Either James and Anthony sign up at a reduced rate or only one of them takes a max-deal. last_img read more

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As budget deadline looms, Wellington Superintendent Weiss said school district is still waiting for state to provide direction

first_imgBy Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Wellington school district, like the 292 other school districts in the state of Kansas, are about to submit budgets to the state next month. But in order to submit a budget to the state, they need the state to provide them some figures.“In my 39 years in public education I have never seen anything like it,” said Rick Weiss, Wellington School Superintendent. “Here we are in the middle of July, and we don’t know what money we are going to have to work with.”As a result, the Wellington school board has decided to have a special meeting after the regularly scheduled Aug. 13 meeting to approve the budget. Normally, a budget is passed at the second Thursday of the month meeting. But Weiss warned the board that this year’s budget could be so hot off the press on August 13 that the board members would be looking at the budget just minutes before having to approve it.Weiss said he is going to attend a workshop on Thursday which he hopes will outline the amount of revenue a school district should expect and how the school should budget. It is required by law that all government entities submit the budget by August 25.Board member Jason Newberry said he would prefer to have some time to review the figures before making a vote and would like to see the budget at the Aug. 13 meeting and then approve (or vote against) the proposed special meeting sometime between Aug. 13 and Aug. 25.Weiss said the block grant funding recently passed by the state is supposed to freeze all figures in place from the 2014-15 budget. But after a recent ruling by a three-judge panel that said the block grant funding is unconstitutional, there is speculation on whether to go by the block grant figures or revert back to the current school finance formula that the legislature has been trying to eliminate.Weiss said he is planning on going with the same figures as 2014-15 on single budgetary items.“According to the block grant we have more freedom and flexibility to allocate money in different places,” Weiss said. “But I don’t want to operate the school district like the state runs the state. So we’ll keep everything in place.”•••••New gymnasium, duct workThe school is about to embark on its second phase on the USD 353 Security and Safety Bond issue. At Thursday’s meeting, the board heard from architects who briefed the board on putting in new heating/air units and duct work in both Eisenhower and Kennedy Elementary schools.The ceilings will be removed at Kennedy and Eisenhower incrementally in order to put in the new duct work and heating/air systems — a process that could last throughout the school year.The architect said all work will start around 4 p.m. when all the students have left for the day.The board also approved an $86,945 change order for moving the heating/air conditioning from the ceiling to the floor and redoing the duct work at Washington Elementary.The construction of the Wellington Middle School auxiliary gymnasium is also scheduled to start sometime during the 2015-16 school year. An architectural rendering of the new facility was presented to the board Thursday. The practice gym will be located on the southeast corner of the WMS complex on the upper level of the campus. Wellington Middle School Principal Jamie Ybarra was on hand and said parents driving in to pick up their children, will be rerouted immediately once school starts. People will turn immediately left and proceed west before turning north.“My thought process is to get people used to the new route right off the bat before the construction of the gym takes place,” Ybarra said.The WMS parking lot is also being replaced. However, the full lot will not be completely paved.•••••Employment changesThe board approved the following employment changes:Resignation:Jesse Dale: WHS PE teacher, head baseball coach and assistant football coach.Hirings:•Jourdan King: WMS Interrelated Educator;•Kelsi Barlow: 5th grade teacher at Eisenhower;•Kurt Sherry: USD 353 gifted education;•Debbie Ham: Special Education at Eisenhower;•Taylor Becker: First grade teacher at Eisenhower;•Briana Stephenson: WHS head volleyball coach, 2015-16 season.Transfers:•Kristin Whaley: from second grade long term sub at Kennedy to first grade teacher at Kennedy.•••••In other business, the board approved:•a request by Pastor Michael Adkins to hold the 125th anniversary of the Friendly Second Baptist Church in May at the Wellington High School;•the appointment of Forrest Bryant as treasurer of the board;•the appointment of Shawn DeJarnett as school attorney;•the adoption of the school calendar for the 2015-16 which will adhere to the 1,116 hour requirement;•the designated snow make-up dates for March 28, April 15 and May 18, 2016;•the increase of substitute teacher rate pay from $75 to $80 per day;•setting food prices at USD 353 as: Breakfast: $2 adults, $1.50 for students, .30 for reduced students; Lunch: $3.50 adults, $2.50 students K-5th grade; $2.75 students WHS 9-12; .40 reduced;•the establishment of various school enrollment fees too many to mention for this article.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (4) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down Nancy S · 265 weeks ago Did I miss how much the middle school students will pay for meals? Report Reply 0 replies · active 265 weeks ago +2 Vote up Vote down meme · 265 weeks ago hope for the best for our kids, because they deserve it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 265 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down whsfan · 265 weeks ago What does the comment that that the “full lot will not be paved” mean? Does this mean a portion of the parking lot is in good enough condition that they don’t need to touch it? Does this mean that they lay gravel down? Please clarify, because I thought they initially presented it as the entire parking lot at the middle school would be repaved completely and that was an item that required the voters to approve, and if they are now scaling that back how is that even allowed based on the information they initially presented in the bond proposal. CUE can you clarify if the voters were miss informed when this was presented or is that statement just need more clarification. Report Reply 0 replies · active 265 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Nail · 255 weeks ago Thanks Report Reply 0 replies · active 255 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

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LIVE: President Trump Addresses U.N. General Assembly

first_imgPresident Trump is expected to call on world leaders to band together against threats posed by Iran in the Middle East and to unite in opposition to what he sees as dangers from other regimes and movements around the globe.President Trump says he’ll talk about growing tensions with Iran when he addresses the United Nations General Assembly this morning.This will be President Trump’s third U.N. address.On Monday, Trump told reporters that aggressive U.S. sanctions are putting great pressure on Iran. He said earlier that Iran is doing very poorly. While the president is meeting with world leaders at the U.N. in New York, another story involving former Vice President Joe Biden his son Hunter and the Ukraine is monopolizing the news cycle.last_img

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