Category: buavfsdvi

Stock market recovery: 2 FTSE 100 British stocks I’d buy for my ISA in December

first_img Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! The Stocks and Shares ISA allowance of £20,000 runs through to the beginning of April 2021. So if you still haven’t fully used it, you still have time in December to buy some stocks before the deadline next year. The ISA acts as a wrapper to shelter gains in stock investments from having to pay capital gains tax. Given the recent stock market recovery, there are plenty of FTSE 100 British stocks that I’ve got on my watchlist as potential buys. The recovery has shown some businesses are undervalued, and still others that it might be worth me avoiding!Property market recoveryIn my opinion, British Land (LSE: BLND) could continue to perform well in December and beyond. The share price is up almost 30% over the past three months as property prices have bounced higher. To understand the correlation, it’s key to understand what British Land does. It’s a holding company for lots of properties owned around the UK. This is split between corporate offices, retail and personal housing, and again a mix between generating rental income and underlying property value growth. 5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…British Land hasn’t had the easiest of years, noted only last month with the business having to reduce the value of the portfolio by £1bn (it had been valued at £11.9bn last year). This was blamed on falling rental income as many office workers did their work fully from home and retail also struggled. The value write-down has been offset by the improving property market in general. The latest Nationwide survey reported that annual house price growth stood at 5.8% as of October. With the stock market recovery, I still think British Land could have further room to run higher. Should the UK agree a deal with the EU over the next few weeks, stocks should continue to rally. The property market could see a further boost from foreign investors piling back into housing. This would likely increase the value of the British Land portfolio.Returning to growthThe Burberry (LSE:BRBY) half-year report (to the end of September) was nothing to write home about. Operating profit fell 75%, due to the impact of consumer spending from the coronavirus. You could argue that some recent share price rises have been from the broader stock market recovery. But investors must be seeing some value for the share price to be up over 26% in the past month.The main driver I’m seeing here is that if you go deeper into the details, Burberry is actually turning the corner. Comparable stores sales were down 45% in Q1, then down 6% in Q2, and are expected to post a positive number from Q3. The business also said it’s in a strong liquidity position. The £300m drawdown of funds from bank credit lines at the start of the year has now been fully repaid. Yes, the half-year report doesn’t look good on the surface (and the full-year report probably won’t either). But I think Burberry could be a buy for December onwards. When you look at the business in more granular detail, I think the worst of the pandemic impact has past. Jonathan Smith | Wednesday, 2nd December, 2020 | More on: BLND BRBY Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Enter Your Email Address Stock market recovery: 2 FTSE 100 British stocks I’d buy for my ISA in December Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Sharescenter_img jonathansmith1 has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended British Land Co and Burberry. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Image source: Getty Images See all posts by Jonathan Smithlast_img read more

Continue Reading

Apopka Airshow postponed

first_img January 5, 2017 at 4:09 pm Due to expected unfavorable weather the Remote Control Association of Central Florida (RCACF) 2017 Airshow has been postponed one week to Saturday, January 14th from 11:00 AMto 3:00 PM.  The 2017 Airshow was previously scheduled for this weekend (January 4th), but due the forecast of inclement weather the event has been rescheduled.The Airshow will include model jet, propeller, helicopter aircraft flown by some of the best remote controlled pilots in the country.Raffles for model planes and accessories will be held during the day and food and beverages will be available for purchase. Local hobby shops and hobby experts will also be on site to answer questions for people interested in exploring the hobby of remote controlled flying.Spectators of all ages are encouraged to attend and participate in one of the biggest model air shows in the Southeast United States.The event is free, but their is a $5 parking donation collected for each car.The 2017 Airshow will take place at Tangerine Field (203 West Keene Road Apopka, FL 32703).Use this link to learn more. Mama Mia Reply Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSRCACF Previous articleFestival includes “real talk” on Apopka issuesNext articleNew housing options coming to Apopka Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment!center_img Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter I had forgotten all about this event. It has been going on for a very long time. A neighbor of ours, that my husband used to work with, used to go and fly his remote plane there. He did lose one of his planes one year though. His was not as big as that big black plane in the photo! It was more the size of those smaller white planes. 1 COMMENT Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Continue Reading

Entertaining keyword purchase

Howard Lake | 8 August 1999 | News Tagged with: Digital Technology A search on “fundraising” at AltaVista today suggested that the keyword “fundraising” has been bought temporarily by Entertainment, the publishers of the coupon books that have raised “over $75 million” for non-profit groups last year. “The world’s greatest fund-raiser” and “We wrote the book on fundraising”, they declare. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Entertaining keyword purchase  34 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

Continue Reading

Microsoft announces second wave of Unlimited Potential grants

first_img Tagged with: Technology Howard Lake | 12 July 2004 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Fairbridge, Leonard Cheshire and the Karrot Internet bus follow Age Concern and Citizens Online which were given a combined total of £177,500 earlier this year in the first round of Unlimited Potential grants.Further grants will be announced in the UK in 2005. For a complete list of Unlimited Potential grant recipients visit: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Microsoft UK’s second wave of Unlimited Potential grants is designed to provide new opportunities through IT to the most disadvantaged groups of young people in the country.The technology company will work with national charities Leonard Cheshire and Fairbridge to support the development of regional IT training and skills projects, underpinned by a cash grant totalling £182,500 and software and curriculum donations. The Karrot Internet bus also receives support.Unlimited Potential is Microsoft’s global programme to provide $1 billion in cash and software for IT skills and training over five years. Advertisement Microsoft announces second wave of Unlimited Potential grants  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Continue Reading

Donors Eleven: who gives to charity bucket collections

first_img Melanie May | 24 April 2017 | News  67 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis28 nfpSynergy has published a quirky look at the types of people who donate (or don’t) to charity bucket collections, identifying eleven main types.The list came about as the result of nfpSynergy staff collecting donations for Plan International UK for a day at London’s Liverpool Street station.These are the types they discovered:The passionate one: clued up on the issues, passionate about the cause and annoyed that others aren’t donating, these people generally give larger amounts – notes are not uncommon. However, they are very rare. They can be slightly worrying for the collector as these people will often know more than them about the issue.The smiler: happy to give and glad that you’re giving them the opportunity to donate, these people are full of thanks and encouragement. They make the collector glad that they are volunteering and give them heart to carry on for another hour.The sympathetic sceptic: these people want to give, but will make sure that the charity, your t-shirt, identification badge, the bucket and/or cause are above board. Will donate after inspecting your badge closely.The furtive one: they get their money sorted out of sight; they then return to put their money in the bucket with a very serious face, with no eye contact, without saying anything, and don’t respond to your cheery ‘thank you’. Surprising and slightly unnerving for the collector.The ‘digesters’: it takes them a while to process the message that the collector is shouting, and realise or decide that they do want to give. They then stop in their tracks (making those behind them a little annoyed) and search for their purse or wallet, return to the collection point, and give.The apologist (1): earnest and slightly furtive, this group scrambles around in their purse or pocket for money and pops whatever they can find into the bucket with a muttered apology about it ‘not being very much’. They don’t realise that whatever they are giving (apart from the man who gave 3p) warms the collector’s heart as they’ve been ignored for the last 10 minutes.The apologist (2): these people apologise for not having any money to donate and hurry on. Their feelings of guilt about not giving can make the collector feel awkward for asking, and may result in an apology in turn.The tease: they make eye contact, smile, nod and encourage the collector but walk on by with no donation.The virtue signaller: they’re already doing lots to help the world, and don’t want to give – but they still want you to know that they’re ‘doing their bit’The rushers: these people are too busy to stop and give, and unfortunately comprise the majority of people.The active rejecters: for this group, charity begins at home, and this fact must be stated very loudly and slightly aggressively.Which ones do you recognise, and, dare we ask, which one are you? About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com. Donors Eleven: who gives to charity bucket collections Tagged with: research street collection street fundraising Advertisement  68 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis28last_img read more

Continue Reading

Mind me launched as “99% digital fundraising factory”

first_img Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Mind me launched as “99% digital fundraising factory”  235 total views,  1 views today  236 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis17 Howard Lake | 18 March 2019 | News French digital fundraising specialists Fred Fournier and Claude Pouvreau have launched Mind me, “a new kind of structure” designed to help nonprofit organisations in their fundraising.They describe it as a “99% digital fundraising factory”. While digital underpins much fundraising, “mind me would never consider digital alone… and because mind me do many other things… offline”.Fournier explains that the agency’s objectives are “not only to raise funds but also ensure awareness, preference, loyalty and finally commitment”, ensuring a very donor-centric vision.Challenges and opportunities for French fundraisingAt mind me’s launch, Fournier shared some of the key challenges faced by French charities and fundraisers, and the opportunities that digital offers:• a 6.5% decrease in individual giving to French charities during first semester 2018• 85% of French fundraisers consider that the nature of fundraising work has changed over the last five years• 24% of French fundraisers spontaneously said that digital is the main reason for these changes• 55% of French people under 30 years old believe that nonprofit organisations do not know how to speak to a young audience• Only 7% of French people believe that the nonprofit sector is the most able to bring change in our society.Mind me teamFred Fournier is is one of the pioneers of digital fundraising in France and has more than 20 years of experience in the sector. He has been the managing director of Optimus, then deputy President of Hopening, and has worked with nonprofits across Europe and internationally.Claude Pourvreau also has extensive digital fundraising experience, and has helped many organisations in France develop their digital fundraising. He is a former digital director of Optimus and Hopening.They are joined by three other colleagues at launch, with data, direct marketing, and strategy experience. Between them they have worked with the LIRYC University Hospital Institute in Bordeaux, anti-torture and death penalty NGO ACAT, and a major Parisian museum.Mind me is a member of the European fundraising network developed by Direct Mind Agency in Austria and Mindwize agency in the Netherlands. Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digitallast_img read more

Continue Reading

Ireland: Women win landslide vote for reproductive justice

Dr. Savita Halappanavar, a member of the Indian community in Ireland, died after being denied an abortion in a medical emergency in 2012.Joyous celebrations are taking place throughout Ireland as women cheer a historic victory in the 35-year struggle for their basic human rights and reproductive choice.  A long, hard fight by the women’s movement won a landslide vote on the May 25 referendum that repealed the anti-abortion Eighth Amendment to the Irish Constitution.Orla O’Connor, co-director of Together for Yes, the umbrella group comprising over 70 organizations and communities that carried out this struggle, called it “a monumental day for women in Ireland.”  She said the vote was “a rejection of an Ireland that treats women as second-class citizens,” reported the May 26 Guardian newspaper.Linda Kavanaugh, organizer of the Abortion Rights Campaign, a co-leader of Together for Yes, said the votes for this “definitive mandate” outnumbered the votes for inserting the amendment in 1983. Grassroots, community-led organizing was key to the long-awaited victory, she stressed. She especially acknowledged the work of “migrants who did not have a vote and who were disproportionately affected by the Eighth [Amendment], as well as the many trans and non-binary people affected.”   (abortionrightscampaign.ie) The migrant groups that joined this movement included Migrants and Ethnic Minorities for Reproductive Justice, the Immigrant Council of Ireland, the Irish Refugee Council, Doris Luimni, and the Migrant and Refugee Rights Center. Due to legal restrictions on travel for immigrants, its exorbitant costs and document requirements, many migrants could not access abortions. Access is particularly difficult for asylum-seekers, refugees, undocumented individuals and trafficking victims.Among other organizations that supported the amendment’s repeal were the Communist Party of Ireland; Sein Fein, the Irish nationalist party; the Trade Union Campaign to Repeal the 8th Amendment; and the Artists Campaign to Repeal the 8th Amendment.  Members of Britain’s Labor Party flew to Ireland to assist the mobilization. Women make history There was a higher than usual voter turnout countrywide; 66 percent of the electorate opted to eliminate the Eighth Amendment, one of the strictest anti-abortion laws in Europe.  Enthusiastic young women were the majority of voters in many polling places. Thousands of Irish people living abroad returned to their homeland to vote, some traveling huge distances, as happened with the same-sex marriage vote in 2015. The repeal referendum won in every county, except one.Although abortion had been illegal in Ireland since 1861, this cruel amendment, which bestowed a fetus with rights equal to those of a woman, was added to the constitution in 1983. The law banned abortions, even where pregnancies resulted from rape or incest or would endanger a pregnant woman’s health or in cases of severe fetal abnormalities. It only allowed an abortion if a woman’s life was at stake.  Even so, some seriously ill women died after being denied the procedure when they needed it, as doctors quibbled over whether an abortion would be legal in each case.Today, 3,000 to 4,000 women leave Ireland annually to obtain abortions.   Many women illegally use imported abortion-causing pills — secretly and without medical supervision. Under current law, those who seek or provide abortions risk up to 14 years imprisonment.The referendum did not establish a new law setting forth women’s right to abortion, but will substitute this language: “Provision may be made by law for the regulation of termination of pregnancy.”  The majority vote gives the government the green light to legalize abortions up to the 12th week of pregnancy and to allow the procedure later in pregnancies under certain circumstances. The public health care system will provide abortions.  Women will gain the right to make their own medical decisions while pregnant, not be forced into or denied care. Ireland’s Prime Minister Leo Varadkar stated that “the culmination of a quiet revolution in Ireland” resulted in voters giving the government a clear mandate to enact legislation legalizing abortions. He has pledged to enact new laws by year’s end. (Guardian, May 26)1983-2018: 35 years of struggleSome 1.43 million people voted to repeal the ban, while 723,632 opted to retain it. The number of pro-choice votes demonstrates the changes in Ireland since 1983.  That year, when divorce was still illegal, and the Catholic Church hierarchy’s grip on the population was still strong, 841,000 people, the majority of voters, approved the Eighth Amendment. The Irish women’s movement fought back then and continued to fight for a woman’s right to choose free, safe, legal abortions.  During the recent campaign, organizers, many young women wearing “Repeal” T-shirts, met with residents of every county and held rallies and meetings throughout the country.Two stunning events strengthened support for the pro-choice movement.  In 1992, the government tried to prevent a suicidal 14-year-old pregnant rape victim from traveling to England to obtain an abortion. After international condemnation, Ireland’s Supreme Court allowed her to go to England for the procedure.  Subsequently, the law was changed to permit women to leave the country to access abortions.Twenty years later, on Oct. 28, 2012, Dr. Savita Halappanavar, a 31-year-old dentist, and member of the Indian community, died of septicemia after the three-day miscarriage of a nonviable fetus in University Hospital Galway. She had repeatedly requested, and been denied, an abortion. Her needless, excruciating death became global news.Outrage grew in Ireland against the inhumane abortion ban. Organizing against it intensified with mass protests around the country.  Thousands marched in Dublin and other Irish cities, and in London, following Halappanavar’s death.In recent years, as more women have joined the workforce, the women’s movement — and pro-choice sentiment — have grown. Irish emigrants have brought back news of progressive reproductive rights laws abroad. Women have publicly told their heart-breaking abortion stories and related their horrifying experiences about being denied critical medical care while pregnant. International human rights groups and women’s organizations have increasingly pressured the Irish government to overturn the law. These factors have elevated consciousness and increased reproductive rights activism inside the country.Revolt against church and stateThe landslide victory by the Irish people was the latest revolt against the Catholic Church’s conservative, patriarchal dogma. The exposés of priests’ sexual and other physical abuse of children and the Magdalene laundries’ exploitation of women and forcible adoption, often involving the sale, of their babies, had weakened the Church’s influence over the population. Susan McKay, a writer in Ireland, said the church tried to influence this vote, but “the church does not have the moral authority it did in ’83 … [with] revelations of child abuse and cruelty toward pregnant women — scandals the church did its best to cover up.” (nytimes.com, May 5)  Activist Bernie Linnane told McKay the anti-choice forces have “lost on divorce, gay marriage, contraception and sex education. Once the Catholic church loses on this campaign, it has lost everything.” Cat Inglis, activist with Eirigi, a pro-socialist organization in Ireland, champions the right to abortion there and in the northern six counties. She explained: “Since the inception of the state the church has had a firm grip on every aspect of Irish life,” but it has lost many battles. “Revelations concerning the church[’s abuses] in the last 20 years” have changed public perception of the church. (RedLine, May 22) And Gail McElroy, politics professor at Trinity College Dublin, stressed, “This [vote] is devastating to the Roman Catholic hierarchy.  It is the final nail in the coffin for them. … [T]heir hopes of re-establishing themselves are gone.” (NY Times, May 26)Clearly, there has been a progressive shift within Ireland’s population on many social issues due to economic and social changes and the Church’s waning influence.  The Repeal vote demonstrates that most people support women’s right to make decisions about their lives, instead of being dictated to by the Church or the state.A May 23 Irish Times editorial said the “Yes” vote would reject the “worldview that relegates a woman’s bodily autonomy below the right of the State to tell her it knows best.” The referendum’s mass approval shows society’s growing respect for women, and it is a step forward for women’s equality — not just in Ireland, but the victory will resonate around the world.Una Mullaly, pro-choice campaigner, views the vote as not solely about abortion, but concerns the historical oppression of women — which was rejected at the ballot box.      The struggle will continue to prevent a right-wing rollback of what was won and to legalize abortion in the British-controlled north of Ireland, where women are demanding this right. In solidarity with “our comrades” there who “supported us unwaveringly,” Abortion Rights Campaign organizer Kavanaugh pledged to “support them in their separate but similar fight to gain abortion access.”FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare this read more

Continue Reading

Mollie Tibbett’s father: ‘We can get her home’

first_imgFacebook(BROOKLYN, Iowa) — The father of missing University of Iowa student Mollie Tibbetts said on Monday that he believes his daughter may be with someone who misunderstood her intentions and created a situation that’s spiraling out of control.“It’s totally speculation,” Rob Tibbetts said, in an interview for ABC’s “Nightline,” “but I do believe that Mollie is with someone who she knows, probably someone who cares about her. But that relationship was misguided, misinterpreted and went wrong, and I think they’re in a place with Mollie and don’t know how to get themselves out of this horrible situation.”Rob Tibbetts said that as the search for Mollie continues, it’s also important to give that individual “the freedom and the space to process this, and to get themselves out of this amount of trouble because they get into a deeper amount of trouble.”His daughter’s kindness, compassion and outgoing personality may have simply given someone the wrong idea, he continued.“I do really believe that what happened to Mollie wasn’t someone that set out to harm her,” Rob Tibbetts said. “I think because they haven’t found Mollie, that Mollie is still some place, and we can get her home.”The 20-year-old Tibbetts went missing July 18. Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been donated to establish a reward fund to help bring her home. Since Thursday, Rob Tibbetts said, almost 500 new leads and tips have surfaced, thanks to local authorities and to Crimestoppers. Mollie Tibbetts, a rising sophomore, was living in Brooklyn, Iowa, with her boyfriend, Dalton Jack, when she went for a jog and hasn’t been seen since. Her story, according to her father, has “struck a chord” with so many because “everyone has a daughter or a sister or a girlfriend like Mollie.” And her disappearance “is so random and senseless and scary that people have adopted Mollie and her story.”When asked what he would say to anyone who may have taken her, Rob Tibbetts responded: “You’ve made a mistake. We’ve all made mistakes. Don’t compound this. Work your way through this. Listen to Mollie.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Continue Reading

No holds barred

first_img Previous Article Next Article While differences of opinion in the workplace can bestimulating and constructive, outright conflict is not. Even smallmisunderstandings can lead to the sparring partners getting the gloves on.Advice is given on how to resolve such disputes.  By Walter Brennan Brian Johnson was stunned to discover that a letter had been written to hismanager accusing him of being impossible to work with. Brian was a successfulsurgeon, and a highly talented professional who had, in his words,”forgotten more than any of these pampered junior staff would everknow”. The problem now though, was that no-one would speak to him. “Theatmosphere was awful,” said Brian. “We would come to work, scrub up,operate and finish with hardly a word being said.” The situation lasted for more than two months, before a letter was sent andhe was summoned to explain the situation. Brian was advised to “get agrip” of the situation before it became public knowledge. He still feelsthe sense of betrayal, anger and hurt from this situation even two years later,although he no longer works in the same hospital. “Why couldn’t my colleagues have talked to me about the problemsfirst?” he asks. “Why did they go behind my back? Why did they try todestroy me?” Conflict is a way of life. Everyone encounters it from the cradle to thezimmer frame. A participant on a course I ran recently asked me, “Whycan’t everybody be friends?” I was uncertain whether this was a questionor simply wishful thinking. Conflict left unresolved is damaging emotionally, organisationally and, ofcourse, financially. The emotional and psychological impact of conflict isconstantly rolled out: stress costs 80 million working days a year and,according to the Confederation of British Industry, that converts to £5.3bnpounds annually1. So how can we eliminate conflict? Indeed, can we or should we eliminate it? What is conflict? The Oxford Dictionary defines conflict as, “…clash, be incompatiblewith”2. Parker and Archer define it as, “A perceptual state involvingthe executive function of the organism where the immediate choices in theorganism’s repertoire, together with the outcome of these choices, are seen toinvolve incompatible motives and needs.”3 Or as Cahn prefers,”Difference or incompatibility between people.”4 However, rather than dwell upon the semantics of increasingly clinical andacademic definitions, this article is about understanding conflict and managingit in the workplace. Why does conflict happen? Maddix5 suggests that conflict is present within organisations because of: – Differences in needs, objectives and values – Differences in perceiving motives, words, actions and situations – Differing expectations of outcomes – favourable versus unfavourable – Unwillingness to work through issues, to collaborate, or to compromise What must be remembered is the fact that conflict happens not necessarilybecause party A wants to sabotage, dominate or dislike party B. Often bothparties mean well and share the same objectives. But how they achieve theseobjectives can be significantly different, prompting bemusement, anxiety,anger, frustration and resistance in others. Conflict is unhealthy when it is not addressed or where there is adetermination that one party will “win” at the expense of the otherparty. When there is unhealthy conflict, lines are metaphorically drawn andcolleagues are forced into a polarisation or an “us or them”situation. When this happens, communication breaks down and trust and mutualsupport disappear. Sadly, when there is conflict, no particular occupationalgroup or status is exempt from the corrosive damage. Case study In one case I dealt with, a fundamental breakdown in approaches to dealingwith aggressive children was sufficient for two groups of highly qualified,mature, professional educational and clinical psychologists to cease talking,co-operating and eventually sharing an office. Staff member Eileen Kearns says, “It all started one day when we werehaving what seemed to be a good old debate about approaches to aggressive childrenin educational settings and what works best. “Unfortunately, one of the senior staff was not present and wasbasically fed information that in retrospect was inaccurate and caused him(John) to believe that his professionalism and ultimately his integrity werebeing questioned by colleagues who did not have the ‘decency’ to talk to himdirectly.” John quickly changed and just stopped talking to colleagues unless he had toand then he was curt and stuck strictly to the point. Within a fortnight, the department,consisting of 11 staff, was divided between allies and supporters of John andhis school of thinking and those against. Eileen, a secretary, who was not even there on the day of the discussion,found herself being wooed and enticed into joining one group or the other. “It was awful, I was frightened to do work for one member of staff forfear of upsetting someone else. I was not allowed to be neutral. What had beena great place to work was now cold and oppressive. Colleagues who had impressedme so much with their intelligence, knowledge and professionalism were nowbehaving like children, trying to get one over the other group.” Intervention I was invited to carry out a review of the organisation’s function andbasically aim to deal with the breakdown in the function of the department.Time and resources dictated that I had six days to try to turn the situationaround. I wrote to all 11 members of staff outlining my role, brief and theexpected outcomes of the project. I also stated that I would wish to meet withas many staff as possible. I discovered that there was only one group of staff who were prepared tomeet with me to discuss issues around the breakdown of this previously verysuccessful operation. All the staff who came to meet with me were those who believed that they hadbeen snubbed by John and his “friends” and felt that they were thevictims in the situation. One by one they talked about their initial puzzlementand eventual resentment towards John for what was happening. “We were now not speaking and therefore not sharing vitalinformation,” one psychologist told me. Based upon the information provided, which thankfully was supplied candidlywithout any fear of breach of confidentiality, I was able to gain a goodpicture of what had happened. Each informant chose to meet me unaccompanied byany representative, formal or informal. Suddenly the other group of staff expressed a wish to meet me and provided asignificantly different picture of events from the first group. It occurred to me, as the saying goes, that there are three sides to anystory: your side, my side and the truth. I recognised I was not going to get tothe truth. I just wanted to get the staff to try and work togetherprofessionally once more. The next stage was to highlight the benefits of effective teamwork and,meeting with each team separately, I facilitated a day of core values to whichemployees can expect to be entitled. I also highlighted what the organisationcan expect from employees and, most importantly, what standards of conductshould exist between employees. I also spelt out the bottom line: how could anybody justify their behaviourtowards colleagues in the wake of a serious incident occurring due to abreakdown in communication? I emphasised just how indefensible such apredicament would be before a disciplinary hearing, a tribunal or, even worse,a Coroner’s court. Staff basically had a choice either to maintain their stance and not workwith their colleagues or to move forward and work through the differencestowards constructive team working. Those who were not prepared to move on werealso warned that there was no future for them within the organisation. Theycould not remain within that organisation and maintain their behaviour. The following week I met with John and asked him what he needed from hiscolleagues for him to communicate and work with them once again. He needed tounderstand why some of them had said what they had about him and to explaintheir behaviours. I used the same approach with two members of the other group (Jane and Paul)who had been most vociferous about John’s behaviour. The next day I met with John and passed on to him what had been said by theother group. I also passed on to his colleagues what he had said. This allowedfor challenges to take place in a safe, emotionally free atmosphere. As is so common with such conflict, most of what happened was interpretationand misinterpretation. With ground rules set, I conducted two mediationsessions each lasting one hour. I controlled all proceedings and informed Johnand Jane that if proceedings became emotional, I would terminate the session. Not surprisingly, in my presence each now presented their case far lessstridently using terms such as “appeared”, “possibly”,”perception”, as opposed to “she did”,”definitely”, “I know”. ??These two sessions reopened thelines of communication and misunderstanding quickly evolved into realisationand a desire to once again work together. Team building Two weeks later I facilitated two teambuilding days. One was held internallyand aimed at restoring corporate values and roles within the department. Thesecond was at a hotel and concentrated on moving forward and developing anumber of projects aimed at highlighting good practice, celebrating success andsharing these achievements through a number of articles, conferencepresentations and finally hosting a conference later in the year. Twelve months later, I went back to spend a day with the team. John is nowthe manager and is committed to understanding the value of conflict and itsmanagement. He has, through his promotion, recognised the need for self-awareness andhow his leadership style can impact positively and negatively on hiscolleagues. Conclusion Conflict is inevitable in the human interactive process. When it causesparties to explore new ideas, test their position, philosophy and practice, andwhen it stretches the imagination, it is positive. When dealt withconstructively, conflict can impel change, yield best practice and generate ahappy fulfilling atmosphere. Ignore it at your peril. References 1. Osborn A (2000) Workplace blues leave employers in the red. Guardian, 12October. 2. Oxford Dictionary (1988) Oxford: Clarendon Press. 3. Parker A, Archer T (1994) The Encyclopaedia of Human Behaviour. London:Academic Press. 4. Cahn D (1994) The Encyclopaedia of Human Behaviour. London: AcademicPress. 5. Maddix R (2000) London: Kogan Page. Walter Brennan BA (Hon) RMN FETC is an independent training consultant andinternational speaker on workplace conflict. For more details visit his website on: www.oliverbrennan.co.uk or e-mail [email protected] audit– Would you say that overall staff within this organisation are happy?– Are your staff happy to stay to complete a task if a job needs doingurgently?– Do you have a problem with organisational stress and sickness levels?– Do staff feel valued and appreciated by their supervisors/managers?– Do you recognise the views and contributions of junior staffindecision-making within your organisation?– Do you have managers and staff who have been described as bullies by otherstaff ?– Are you able to deal with most disputes/grievances informally andamicably?– Do you encourage staff to express views and opinions that may conflictwith the corporate philosophy?– Do you reward managers/supervisors who can flex their “interpersonalmuscles” (show how tough they can be) with adjectives such as “Theyget things done” or, “They don’t tolerate any nonsense”?– Do you consider staff who go off sick with stress to be”inadequate” or “weak”?– Do the problems of staff seem to get in the way of this organisation’sreal business?– Could you improve the culture of this organisation and make it a betterplace to work?– How are we seen by our competitors? Are we good or bad employers?– Do we encounter special problems retaining or attracting good staff tothis organisation?– Are the senior managers seen as remote and aloof by the workforce?– Does the workforce know who the chief executive is?– Do most of the senior managers employed within this organisation enjoy thetrust and respect of the workforce?– Are we committed to promoting equal opportunities for our workforce(provide evidence)?– Would we take disciplinary action against a manager who wasbullying/harassing staff? No holds barredOn 1 Aug 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Continue Reading

…in brief

first_img…in briefOn 23 Oct 2001 in Personnel Today This week’s news in briefDouble bias claim A female HR manager is claiming sexual discrimination against her formerJapanese employer who said that in his country, men are considered moreintelligent than women. Christine Pratt is claiming sexual and racialdiscrimination against Sanden International at an employment tribunal. See nextweek’s Personnel Today for the story in full. Rolls axes 5,000 jobs Rolls-Royce is to shed 5,000 jobs as the crisis in the aviation marketdeepens. The company plans to axe 3,800 jobs across the UK by next March. It ispredicting a downturn in demand of around 25 per cent in 2002. It hasoperations in Derby, Bristol, Hucknall and Ansty, East Kilbride and Sunderland. Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Articlecenter_img www.rolls-royce.comHunt for staff goes on Employer confidence has not been as damaged by the events of 11 September asmany experts predicted. The majority of UK employers are still expecting totake on staff in the fourth quarter of 2001 and for employment prospects toremain steady, according to Manpower research. Only 5 per cent of respondentswere more pessimistic.  www.manpower.co.ukCuts must be genuine Travel companies that have used the 11 September terrorist attacks on the USas an excuse to get rid of unwanted staff could be vulnerable to unfairdismissal claims, an employment law specialist has warned. Maureen Singleton,of Leeds-based solicitors Brooke North, said she had been approached by anumber of people who have lost their jobs over recent weeks and wished topursue cases against their former employers. HR closes pay gap HR professionals in the legal profession are closing the pay gap with theirsenior legal colleagues, a survey reveals. The TMP Worldwide research showsthat London-based HR directors now command salaries of up to £100,000 a yearcompared with salaried partners who can earn between £65,000 and £225,000.  www.tmp.com Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

Continue Reading