Category: bvqttmmmc

Real Good Food Co sees sales dip

first_imgThe Real Good Food Company’s interim results saw total group sales dip 8% to £104m in the six months to 30 June. Overall, the group made a pre-tax loss of £1.59m in a period of “difficult trading conditions”.Sales at its baking ingredients division Renshaw grew 13% to £14.3m, but operating profit dropped 32% yoy to £78,000. Its sugar division Napier Brown saw sales fall 10% to £85.7m, with operating profit down 36% to £1.8m. Its bakery division, which includes Haydens Bakeries and Seriously Scrumptious, saw sales dip 4% to £8,535,000, with an operating loss of -£275,000.Chairman Pieter Totte said Christmas was a critical period.last_img

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UPDATE: Missing boys found

first_imgIndianaLocalMichiganNews UPDATE: Missing boys found By Brian Davis – June 7, 2020 0 594 Twitter Google+ Pinterest Pinterest (Photo supplied/Indiana State Police) UPDATED: Ace and Cruz Shaffer have been located.The DeKalb County Sheriff’s Department responded to Indian Springs Campground on a report of a vehicle and kids matched the description in the Silver Alert issued earlier by the Michigan State Police.Officers were able to locate the two children in a camper.  The children were returned to their mother.  James Shaffer was arrested and is facing two counts of Interference with custody in violation of a court order.EARLIER: A Statewide Silver Alert has been issued for two missing boys identified as Ace Shaffer and Cruz Shaffer.Ace is a 7-year-old white male, 3 feet 10 inches, 40 pounds, brown hair with brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a blue and red Under Armor T-shirt, Batman sandals, and blue jeans.Cruz is a 5-year-old white male, 3 feet 10 inches, 40 pounds, brown hair with brown eyes, and was last seen wearing a blue shirt with a dinosaur eating an X-Box controller, blue jeans, and Spiderman sandals.Ace and Cruz are believed to be in the company of their father, James Shaffer. James is a 30-year-old white male, 5 feet 5 inches, 140 pounds, brown hair with brown eyes.James, Ace, and Cruz were last seen in a black 2003 to 2005 Chevrolet Suburban with a possible Indiana license plate D349RX.Ace and Cruz are missing from Bryan, Ohio, and were last seen on Friday, May 29, at 11 a.m. Ace and Cruz are believed to be in danger. Ohio police, as well as police in Michigan, are also looking for the boys.Anybody with information about Ace and Cruz Shaffer is asked to contact the Michigan State Police at 734-242-3500 or 911. WhatsApp Facebook Facebook Twitter Google+ WhatsApp Previous articleMembers of Indiana Black Legislative Caucus want choke holds bannedNext articleOne person killed, others hurt, driver arrested after crash on McKinley Avenue in South Bend Brian Davislast_img read more

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New head for Zeelandia

first_imgInternational bakery ingredients manufacturer Zeelandia has appointed Michiel de Ruiter as chief executive as of 1 May 2015. He will succeed Roelof Krist, who will step down from the position on 1 April.De Ruiter has held several general management positions at international companies for almost 16 years. He has worked for companies including McKinsey & Company and Royal Friesland Foods and was most recently managing director and co-owner of Hochdorf Nutricare, the baby food division of Hochdorf Swiss Nutrition.He said: “Zeelandia is an international family-owned business, which appeals to me personally. I look forward to working with its dedicated employees, to reach new levels of innovation and to further the company’s growth. The rich company history, combined with their passion and knowledge, make Zeelandia well-positioned for future success.”Krist served Zeelandia for more than 11 years, helping the company double its revenue and expand its global reach in that time.He said: “I am proud of the current state of the Zeelandia Group. Contributing to Zeelandia’s growth was a challenge and an honour. The future of the group will be shaped by my successor, along with the two other members of the executive board.”Krist is now to retire.last_img read more

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Mapping the road to obesity

first_imgBy creating a “map” of histone modifications in fat cells, investigators have discovered two new factors that regulate fat formation, a key step on the road to better understanding obesity, diabetes, and other metabolic disorders. Led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, the study appears in the October issue of the journal Cell.“These findings help to demonstrate the power of epigenomic mapping when it comes to gleaning key insights into fat cell formation,” explains senior author Evan Rosen, an investigator in the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at BIDMC and associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School (HMS). Fat cells, also called adipocytes, play an integral role in regulating metabolism by controlling lipid and glucose balance.To better understand how adipocytes control the genes that impart the specialized functions of these cells, the researchers turned to epigenomics, and specifically the arm of epigenomics known as histone modifications.“Deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] is tightly wound around proteins called histones, which, over time, can accumulate chemical modifications, or ‘marks,’ ” explains Rosen. “These marks instruct the cell which genes to turn on and off, and by mapping these modifications, we can gain important insights that would be unattainable through traditional means.”Unlike previous investigations, which examined fat cells at a single static time point, this new study mapped several histone modifications throughout the course of fat cell development, using a technique called chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massively parallel sequencing, or ChIP-Seq. This method relies on the ability to sequence tens of millions of short stretches of DNA (in this case DNA bound to modified histones) and then to reassemble results into a coherent genome. In addition to following these histone markers across time, the scientists also mapped the markers across species.“Our study looked at both mouse cells and human cells,” explains Rosen. “This is key because each cell type can accumulate histone marks that actually have nothing to do with fat cell differentiation. Consequently, by comparing two different cell models, we were able to sift through and focus on the epigenetic marks that appeared in both cell types.”What emerged was a core set of histone modifications that formed the basis of a “road map” for the scientists to follow. And, by using this new map, the investigators discovered two transcription factors (proteins that control the copying of DNA into RNA) that regulate fat cell formation.“We found two new transcription factors — SRF and PLZF — involved in fat cell development,” explains Rosen. “We have essentially demonstrated how an epigenomic road map can be used to identify biology that could not have been predicted through any other means.”  Subsequent experiments confirmed the proteins’ roles in fat cell development: When either the SRF or the PLZF protein was decreased, fat cells generated at a faster rate, and, conversely, when the amount of either protein was increased, fat cell development ceased.“Although these particular studies were focused on the development of fat cells, we have reason to think that SRF and PLZF may be involved in the workings of mature fat cells as well,” notes Rosen, adding that these new findings, therefore, have the potential to impact metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.“The huge costs of obesity and metabolic disease, both in terms of health and from a financial standpoint, are making adipocyte biology increasingly important,” he adds. “With these new findings we now have a better understanding of normal fat cell development, and going forward, we can compare normal fat cells to fat cells in disease states. If we can better understand why fat cells behave as they do, then we can work to develop therapies for obesity or diabetes.”This study was funded by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the American Diabetes Association.Co-first authors of the study are Zhao Xu of BIDMC and Tarjei Mikkelsen of the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT. Co-authors include Broad Institute investigators Xiaolan Zhang, Li Wang, and Eric Lander; and Jeffrey Gimble of the Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana University System.last_img read more

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The Spring Awakening Wendlas Take Us Behind the Scenes of the Revival

first_img Related Shows Believe! Deaf West’s Spring Awakening revival is currently running on Broadway and on January 4, NBC News went behind the scenes of the groundbreaking production, profiling Wendla and the Voice of Wendla, Sandra Mae Frank and Katie Boeck, respectively. “I wanted to learn how to sing,” said Frank, one of nine deaf actors in the cast, about her childhood ambition. “Here I am singing, just singing in a different way.” Co-star Oscar winner Marlee Matlin later added: “I can’t be the only one. I want to be able to see more deaf actors get recognized for their work.” Check out the video below and then the show, playing at the Brooks Atkinson through January 24. Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 24, 2016 Spring Awakening View Commentslast_img read more

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5 common credit score myths that could be costing you money

first_imgFor how important your credit score is, misconceptions are rampant.There are a number of things that people commonly think they know when it comes to their credit, but that it turns out aren’t true. These mistakes can result in a lower credit score, which can cost you money since lenders will often charge higher interest rates to those with lower scores.These misconceptions persist despite the fact that credit scores are more easily available to consumers than ever. More and more credit card issuers are giving their customers free credit scores. In addition, for more than a decade, credit reports from each of the big three bureaus — TransUnion, Equifax and Experian — have been available for free once a year, through annualcreditreport.com. “I think people have a little better grasp on the basics than in previous years, but they’re just taking a cursory glance at their reports and some of the nuances of credit scoring are lost on them,” says Jeanine Skrowronski, a credit card analyst at Bankrate.Here are five common credit myths: continue reading » 89SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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FOM rules to be taken up by NCUA Nov. 19

first_imgA field of membership (FOM) proposed rule will be taken up at the National Credit Union Administration’s Nov. 19 meeting, as requested by CUNA. FOM reform is a top issue for CUNA, and CUNA has urged the agency to refrain from imposing any FOM restrictions beyond what is required in the Federal Credit Union Act.In a letter sent to the NCUA in June, CUNA outlined a number of principles for FOM reform, as well as a number of suggestions that are within the agency’s immediate authority and some that would require a rule change.Specific changes CUNA has requested include: continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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A look into the future: What will credit unions be like in 25 years?

first_imgWouldn’t all of our jobs be easier if we could look into a crystal ball?  Year-end predictions are usually pretty interesting to read.  Predictions for the where the credit union landscape will be in the year 2040 highlights some very noteworthy challenges and bright spots. Let’s look at the future according to the current and emerging trends making up the predictions that Credit Union Times is reporting on for the year 2040:“There are fewer than 3,000 credit unions serving more than 150 million members. Credit unions are also in fierce competition with P2P lenders that emerged after the Great Recession of 2008.Consumers commonly use wearable virtual reality devices to shop for everything – including financial services – to support their lifestyles. It will be more common for people to live beyond 100 years. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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2020 is brimming with historic firsts for the LGBTQ community—especially queer people of color

first_img– Advertisement – The presidential election undoubtedly matters—but so do the smaller races. Every win is worth celebrating.  Colorado elected its first openly bisexual candidate to the state legislature in David Ortiz. Notably, Ortiz is also the state’s first wheelchair user elected to the legislature.Lesbian Episcopal pastor Kim Jackson made history in becoming the first openly LGBTQ member of Georgia’s state senate. Also in the South, Tennessee elected Torrey Harris to the state house, where he will become the first openly LGBTQ member. In Oklahoma, Mauree Turner won a historic race as well. Turner will become the first openly nonbinary person elected to a state legislature in the entire country. Turner is also the first Muslim lawmaker in the Oklahoma legislature. More than 500 openly LGBTQ people were on the ballot. Transgender, nonbinary, and queer people are taking up much-deserved and much-needed space in our elected offices all over this nation. Why does that matter so much? Because in the rush to paint all voters or people in a certain state as irredeemable or uneducated, the reality is, there are progressive activists on the ground all across this nation who are doing the work every single day. And some of those people are being elected. That’s incredible. Politically, of course, and in terms of visibility. Seeing an openly transgender elected official, or an openly queer woman of color, or an openly gay person with disabilities, and so on, can be truly life-changing for young people anywhere, but especially in places where LGBTQ folks face additional barriers of oppression and discrimination.- Advertisement –center_img Want to look at races outside of the Northeast? Excellent. First, we can chat about an enormous win coming out of Kansas, where Stephanie Byers, a member of Chickasaw Nation, became the first openly transgender member of the Kansas state legislature, as well as the first openly transgender person of color elected to a state legislature. Not just to the Kansas state legislature, but any state legislature. Again: History. Some good news came out of Florida, too. Shevrin Jones was just elected to become Florida’s first openly LGBTQ state senator. Not long after his win, Jones was joined by a candidate for the New York state senate, Jabari Brisport. And don’t forget about Michele Rayner-Goolsby, who also carried an important victory home in Florida. Rayner-Goolsby has become the first openly LGBTQ Black woman elected to the House of Representatives in Florida.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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The man with a basic instinct for property

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