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Food Retail Revolution

first_imgRoughly 20 years ago, online grocers promised to affordably and conveniently deliver groceries to homes.Several of these companies had successful initial public offerings before the entire industry more or less went bankrupt and disappeared. Although the lesson of the failed first attempt at food retail sector technological revolution was clear, firms have continued to make forays into that space, which have created a stream of failures. Traditional grocers are now preparing to harness technology in new ways and are ready to unleash a new food tech revolution that’s more likely to succeed.Through technology, food retailers know exactly what’s on the shelves and what’s on the way, and they can adjust prices without relabeling every box, can or bottle. All this information is available at stores and at headquarters.This technology is important because food retail profit margins are exceedingly low. They average around 2 percent. That means new, online grocers find it hard to undercut supermarkets and food retailers on price.Further, the advanced logistics and technology currently used by traditional food retailers mean that online retailers don’t have an information technology advantage.Even though online food retail has failed repeatedly and lost several billion dollars in venture capital, a second-generation revolution in online food retail is underway. This revolution promises even more technology, more online shopping and new, hybrid models of food retail.This revolution, unlike the first, which was spearheaded by new entrants, is being led by existing industry leaders. For this reason, in addition to lessons learned from the many failures so far, the second-generation revolution is likely to succeed.New technology applications are perfectly represented by Kroger’s new, wide rollout of personal scanners. Shoppers use their own scanner, provided by Kroger, or a smartphone app to scan items as they place them in their shopping cart.The shopper can see the cost of each item and their running total. When they leave the store, their groceries are automatically charged to the credit or debit card they chose to link to their account.Existing phone apps can map trips through stores based on shopping lists and can direct and alert the shopper to items on the list using the phone’s GPS capability. These apps have been tested by a number of supermarket chains.In addition to e-commerce firms such as Amazon, brick-and-mortar supermarkets are giving online food retail another try. Walmart is clearly signaling its desire to meet Amazon in cyberspace. Other traditional supermarkets are also offering online sales that are often fulfilled from the local store’s shelves and delivered to shoppers’ homes very quickly for a small (say $10) fee.These new, hybrid models of food retail appear to be the most important part of this revolution, leveraging brick-and-mortar stores, not eliminating them. When traditional supermarkets fulfill online sales from existing stores, they avoid adding any expenses for new warehouses or infrastructure.Walmart allows shoppers to order groceries online and pick them up curbside. Walmart emails the customer when the order is ready, then the customer drives up and employees load the groceries into the customer’s vehicle. The Amazon-Whole Foods merger will likely pave the way for customers to buy low-priced staples online from Amazon and pick them up at a local Whole Foods store, where they can also buy fresh produce, seafood and other items in person.All of these hybrid models will increase options and convenience for customers more than they will lower prices. Plus, these hybrids will offer consumers online convenience while preserving the opportunity to purchase specific items after personal inspection. Maintaining the “touch” aspect for some food items is an important advantage of these hybrid models.Earlier attempts to combine e-commerce and food retail generally ended in epic failure. The coming, second-generation revolution in food retail is being led not by startups, but by established retail leaders. By leveraging existing supply chains to add online retail, new technology or both, the food retail revolution has a much higher probability of success.This article was originally released on Jan. 3, 2018, on Forbes online.last_img read more

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Dairy price hike to help Vermont farmers

first_imgThe US Department of Agriculture has lifted the floor price for dairy products, it was announced today. The decision comes two days after the Vermont senators and a coalition of more than two dozen senators from other dairy states met with Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. The prices will rise from $1.13 per pound for block cheese to $1.31; barrel cheese, from $1.10/lb. to $1.28; nonfat dry milk powder, from $0.80/lb. to $0.92. This has the potential to increase the price paid to farmers for milk by $1.25 to $1.50 per hundredweight.The meeting and the multi-region coalition of senators were organized by Senator Leahy, the senior-most member of the Agriculture Committee, to seek a short-term hike in the price the federal government pays for milk and dairy products in the marketplace.  Leahy and the coalition also followed through with an appeal to White House Budget Director Peter Orszag.Leahy said, Secretary Vilsack became our partner in getting this done, and we are grateful that dairy farmers have a true ally at USDA.  Government dairy purchases are part of the overall safety net, but in this case we also want these purchases to be a catalyst to help stabilize the downward spiral in milk prices.  Dairy farms in Vermont and across the nation are hurting, and this is the fastest and most direct short-term step that s available to stop the bleeding.  We will continue to push for other relief but those steps will take longer.Senator Sanders said, I appreciate the secretary’s quick response to our request. This is a good start but much more needs to be done if Vermont dairy farmers are going to receive a fair price for their product. My office continues to look at all available options to raise milk prices for family-based dairy farms, including expanding the MILC program and investigating monopolistic practices in the dairy industry.Governor Douglas said, We are incredibly pleased that Secretary Vilsack has raised the dairy support prices. This is a first and important step to relieve some of the financial stress Vermont dairy farmers and dairy farmers across the nation are experiencing. I want to thank our Congressional Delegation for their work on this important issue.”Vermont Agriculture Secretary Roger Allbee said, We have all been working hard to encourage USDA to raise dairy support prices to bring some immediate relief to dairy farmers. I want to commend our Congressional Delegation for acknowledging the severity of the crisis and working with Secretary Vilsack to make this happen quickly.Under the Dairy Product Price Support Program, the USDA serves as a buyer of last resort to help clear commodity dairy markets during periods of exceptionally low farm-level prices. A coalition of Northeast governors and agriculture officials, including Governor Douglas and Agriculture Secretary Roger Allbee, have been working together to find ways to bring immediate help to dairy farmers. This is a very complex and difficult challenge for agriculture in Vermont.  While we are going to continue to do all we can to support struggling farmers in this time of need, action at the federal level is necessary in order to achieve lasting solutions, said Governor Douglas.  The progress made on these dairy issues is the culmination of more than six months of work between my office, the Agency of Agriculture led by Secretary Allbee and the entire Vermont Congressional Delegation, who have been working diligently to bring these issues to Washington on behalf of Vermont s dairy farmers.Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.), who also had urged the Administration to raise the dairy price floor, said, Secretary Vilsack s decision is good news for dairy farmers and good news for Vermont. While it s clear that this is a short-term remedy and not a long-term solution to the crisis facing the dairy industry, this much-needed support for family farmers will help them weather the storm. I applaud Secretary Vilsack s action and I look forward to continuing the fight for Vermont s dairy farmers.Source: Vermont congressional delegation. Governor Douglas’ office. July 31, 2009.# # # # #last_img read more

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Mountain Mama | A Walk in the Woods

first_imgAn afternoon walk in the woods became my reward for a morning of writing during my week-long writing residency at the Weymouth Center for the Arts. It was a simple thing. Trails meandered behind the twenty-room estate under a forest of longleaf pines.The Weymouth house, with its warm polished wood floors and thoughtfully decorated furnishings provided the type of space that makes me want to rise as a writer, to string together words worthy of that sacred place. Legends like F. Scott Fitzgerald and Thomas Wolfe honed their craft there. After the solitude of writing in an-almost-empty-historical home, the noises in the forest were a welcome relief to the words prattling inside my head. The mundane seemed extraordinary after all the self-imposed quiet – the whispering breeze, the scampering squirrels, and the chirping birds.1273305_10153447198041299_3913621511601840679_oI’d come back and my afternoon writing stint often stretched long into the evening. Sometimes the words flowed. Other times I just stared at the blank screen. At times such an intense loneliness set in that it felt excruciating to sit still for another minute. I paced around the library, looking at the photographs of famous authors inducted into the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. I knew that two other men were staying there, in separate wings. The only sign I saw of them those first few days was the placard hanging on their respective doors, “Writer working. Please do not disturb. ”10317784_10153447193856299_792300550543255459_oBy nightfall, I locked myself in my bedroom. Staying at Weymouth felt like living in a museum, one steeped in history, guarded by spirits. I worried about getting lost in the twisting hallways or stumbling on one of the many steps that led up or down into yet another wing. In the middle of the night, my door banged shut or the window rattled. At some point every night, I woke up afraid. One morning I bumped into another writer in the kitchen. Matter-of-factly he mentioned that he always has such vivid dreams while staying at Weymouth. He’s an established author with four published books and has stayed at Weymouth several times. I wanted to hug him, so relieved was I that I wasn’t the only one. For the past few nights there, I’d seen dead friends in my dreams. I’d spent the night with past lovers. I had dreamt about my son and felt sad that it would still be a few more days before I saw him again. I woke up each morning exhausted. I wondered if it was worth it, counting the hours until the freaked-out nights passed, struggling to be productive and focused. Toward the end of the week, I wanted to get out of there. I’m prone to escapism. When I stay put for too long, I get the urge to go. When I’ve been gone for too many days in a row, I long to stay put. I’ve tried staying and I’ve left more than I haven’t, all the while wanting a break from the only person I couldn’t get a break from – myself.1599368_10153447155551299_5180097153021211259_oThe words on the page were undeniably me, and there was no escaping that, so I went the only place I could, into the woods. I walked and walked, taking one trail to the next until I was back where I started. Some days the sun tempted me to linger longer. I’d sprawl my body on the moss.  I stretched my legs and arms out long, taking up as much room as I could. Surrendering to the earth like that somehow helped me lay it all down on the page, all the magic and tragic twists my life had taken, leading me on unintended and soul-smashingly beautiful adventure of single parenting in the South.By day six, I’d achieved what I’d set out to do – my manuscript, just shy of 80,000 words, about 280 pages of a book. I’ve edited it and honed it down to be the best I’m capable of making it. I’d brought it as far as I could.At Weymouth, I had to square up with myself, to dig deeper, and to sit still for longer than I imagined possible. Only then did I meet a version of myself who settled into being alone.[divider]More from Mountain Mama[/divider]last_img read more

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60th CONJEFAMER Air Chiefs Discuss COVID-19, Air Operations, Space Domain

first_imgBy Technical Sergeant Angela Ruiz, U.S. Air Forces Southern/12th Air Force/Edited by Diálogo Staff October 21, 2020 General Charles Q. Brown, Jr., chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force, and Major General Barry R. Cornish, commander of U.S. Air Forces Southern/12th Air Force, virtually joined air chiefs from 19 nations across the Western Hemisphere for the 60th Conference of American Air Chiefs (CONJEFAMER, in Spanish), September 30, 2020.The System of Cooperation Among the American Air Forces (SICOFAA, in Spanish) virtually hosted this CONJEFAMER, which is usually held in June by a participating nation but was postponed due to COVID-19. The conference provides air chiefs an opportunity to meet and collectively collaborate on SICOFAA’s agenda, combined training exercises, and humanitarian assistance and disaster relief operations in the region.General Ramsés Rueda Rueda, commander of the Colombian Air Force, participates in the 60th CONJEFAMER from his office, as the conference is held virtually due to COVID-19. (Photo: Colombian Air Force)“Humanitarian assistance and disaster relief efforts, particularly during COVID-19, have never been more vital across the globe. The Conference of American Air Chiefs is an event that builds trust and support between the U.S. and our Latin American partners. The relationships built among all the air chiefs is invaluable, and gives us the opportunity for our nations to collaborate when responding to humanitarian crises and natural disasters in the Western Hemisphere,” said Gen. Brown.There have been more than 200 days of COVID-19 air operation responses in the Western Hemisphere since the pandemic reached the Americas, thrusting the air forces into air transportation logistics of humanitarian aid, food delivery, support to health and state agencies, medical evaluations, and support to each nation’s security. The air chiefs shared their experiences, lessons learned and best practices with COVID-19 during the virtual conference.General Ramsés Rueda Rueda, commander of the Colombian Air Force, said that SICOFAA member nations are preparing for live exercise Cooperation VII (Cooperación VII), which will be held in Rionegro, Colombia, in August 2021. The exercise Angel of the Andes will also be conducted as part of Cooperation VII. “[The exercise allows us] to train under a combined multinational scheme, to plan for the interoperable use of air power, response capabilities, and humanitarian care to manage large-scale natural disasters, supported by resources provided by SICOFAA to develop this exercise.”The air chiefs concluded the conference with a discussion on building international partnerships in the space domain and incorporating space capabilities in future combined humanitarian assistance and disaster response operations for the benefit the region. Seven Latin American nations have active space programs and an additional three have space academics.“I was honored to represent the U.S. Space Force at the Conference of American Air Chiefs, the first since our establishment last December [2019],” said U.S. Space Force Lieutenant General William Liquori, deputy chief of Space Operations, Strategy, Plans, Programs, Requirements, and Analysis. “Robust partnerships with like-minded space-faring nations like those in attendance today are essential to the long-term security and sustainability of the space domain.”“Although this year’s conference is virtual, it is only possible thanks to the bonds formed from previous successful conferences,” Gen. Brown said.last_img read more

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Board ponders Rule 4-4.2 change

first_imgA Bar rule that prohibits attorneys from speaking to public officials at a public forum if those officials are represented by counsel should be changed, according to a special Bar committee.But the panel has concluded no change should be made as that rule affects prosecutors who want to talk to represented criminal defendants.Board member Jennifer Coberly, chair of the Special Committee to Review Rule 4-4.2, told the board in May she hopes to have a rule amendment for the board’s August meeting.Concerns over the rule have largely focused on criminal investigations, where prosecutors might want to talk to a defendant as part of an undercover operation.Coberly said committee members spent considerable time looking at that situation. But, she added, representatives of U.S. attorneys determined “with everything that’s going on they had a better understanding of the rule as it presently exists. They wanted the rule to stay as it is.” The committee had considered changing the rule to allow the contact if prosecutors got a court order.The committee was uncomfortable, she added, with adopting ABA model language that prohibits contact but allows exceptions “authorized by law.”On the civil side, there was concern that if a lawyer was suing, say, a city council on behalf of a client or his or her own interest, that lawyer was prohibited from addressing the council at a public forum, unless the city’s attorney permitted it.“Members of the committee determined that lawyers should be able to speak to government officials at a public forum,” Coberly said. Board ponders Rule 4-4.2 change Board ponders Rule 4-4.2 changecenter_img July 1, 2002 Regular Newslast_img read more

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What Does Comcast-Time Warner Merger Mean for Cablevision and Newsday?

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Consolidation is coming to the American cable television industry, but what that portends for the future of Bethpage-based Cablevision Systems Corp. and their subsidiary, Newsday, is far from clear.Earlier this year Comcast, the largest cable company in the country, announced its intention to buy Time Warner Cable, the nation’s second-largest cable company, for $45 billion, in a deal that still requires federal approval. The announcement fueled speculation that the other big cable operators, including Cablevision, which is reportedly the fourth-largest in the business with its 3 million subscribers, could be up for grabs. And if another company gobbled up Cablevision, would it retain or unload Newsday, which it acquired in 2008 from the Tribune Company for $650 million? With the Dolan family’s backing, Long Island’s lone daily newspaper has survived the downslide of the digital age, but it’s hard to tell if that would continue under new ownership.Certainly, cable, not newspapers, is where all the acquisition action is these days.“We have the financial flexibility to chase a few more rabbits,” John Malone, the billionaire investor whose holding company, Liberty Media, is Charter Communication’s largest stockholder, told Bloomberg News, referring to Charter’s bid for Time Warner Cable that it lost to Comcast.Some industry analysts thought his comment meant that Cablevision was suddenly in the cross-hairs because Charter’s current chief executive, Thomas Rutledge, had once been a top dog at Cablevision until he resigned in December 2011 after not seeing eye to eye with Cablevision’s grand poobah, James Dolan. But, Malone had told Bloomberg in October that he didn’t see Cablevision as a merger target because it didn’t have room left to grow in the pay-TV households of Long Island.Wall Street analysts agree.“Relative to other operators, Cablevision suffers the worst of both worlds,” media analyst Craig Moffett wrote in a November report for Sanford C. Bernstein & Co., an investment research firm he then worked for. “Its starting penetration is already almost double its peers, making it harder to gain and easier to lose.”If anyone outside the Dolan family knew the ins and outs of Cablevision, it would be Rutledge, asserted some analysts willing to dismiss any bad blood lingering between him and Dolan. The Cablevision scion himself added to the speculation when he gave a rare interview to The Wall Street Journal last summer when he refused to say whether the Dolans would still own the company two decades from now.“You can’t rule out the possibility of a sale,” he admitted.But, a big development in the cable industry last week significantly changes the dynamic, analysts say. On April 28, Charter and Comcast agreed on a deal that would let Charter pick up some 3 million subscribers that Comcast wants to divest while swapping its subscribers in areas of the country Charter prefers not to serve. Assuming the merger passes muster with the U.S. Department of Justice as well as the Federal Communications Commission, Charter would become dominant in the Midwest and Comcast Time Warner Cable would become dominant on both Coasts.Just as importantly, Charter would become the second-largest cable company in the country behind Comcast, which would have 30 million subscribers, or about 30 percent of the cable industry. The prospect of one media entity wielding that much control doesn’t sit well with consumer advocates—or with U.S. Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), who criticized the merger at recent Senate committee hearings, calling it “a disaster.”“We’ve been opposed to the Comcast Time Warner deal since it was announced,” said Harold Feld, senior vice president at Public Knowledge, a non-profit, pro-consumer group based in Washington, D.C. “Adding Charter into the mix has not made it any prettier from our perspective.”But the new deals suggest that Cablevision is off the table—for now.“Charter is not going to be in a position to make a big acquisition,” Feld told the Press. “Charter will need to take some time absorbing [Comcast’s subscribers] and restructuring before they could even think about acquiring somebody else.”Industry analyst Craig Moffett, now at his own firm, MoffettNathanson LLC, put it this way: “The question used to be whether Cablevision is for sale. The question now is who would be the buyer?” Moffett told the Press.“Comcast is restricted,” he said. “They’re selling subscribers to fit under the FCC’s ceiling. Time Warner Cable is out of the picture. Charter is divesting the last of its presence on the East Coast. I think at this point it would be hard to find a buyer.”The prospects for Charter buying Cablevision definitely “took a hit,” according to Lance Vitanza, managing director and partner at CRT Capital Group, based in Stamford, Conn.“If you thought a Cablevision deal was going to happen in the near term, now the timing is going to be pushed off,” he told the Press. “Charter is certainly not going to do another deal in the midst of doing this deal.”A Cablevision representative declined to comment.BATTLE OF THE BROADBANDWhat’s been driving the cable industry to consolidate is the desire to gain leverage over the networks, content producers and program providers in order to stifle rising prices for retransmission and carrying fees.It was a dispute over higher fees charged by the Fox Network that had led to Cablevision imposing a service blackout for two weeks in October 2010, which generated a class action lawsuit that is still winding its way through the federal justice system. In a similar scuffle last fall, Time Warner Cable blacked out the CBS network and its related channels, like Showtime, for almost a month in a dispute over how much it was paying for their programs and then had to concede defeat as the NFL football season began. As Time Warner Cable’s chairman and chief executive, Glenn Britt, told The New York Times, “We certainly didn’t get everything we wanted.”Dolan had told the Journal last August that Cablevision’s position in the New York metropolitan market “helps us have more leverage than our size would dictate,” when it comes to pushing back against content providers’ strong-arm tactics to raise programming prices. But, he added that “there could come a day” when his company decides to drop TV and shift to broadband as its main offering.“We are going to continue to do the right things for the shareholders,” he told the Journal.“Cablevision has generally had the problem that the Dolan family has often been at odds with other investors,” said Feld, of Public Knowledge. “They have a good, compact market but they have never been successful at finding a good way to expand.”An industry analyst based in the New York metropolitan area who spoke on background explained the skepticism prevailing on Wall Street regarding Cablevision’s James Dolan, who announced at the beginning of April that he was naming himself chief executive officer, his wife Kristin Dolan the new chief operating officer and Brian Sweeney the new president.“For years there’s been a positive and a negative in Cablevision stock,” the investment expert told the Press. “The positive is that somebody someday is going to consolidate Manhattan and Long Island. But not anymore. Not for a very long time.“The negative has always been called ‘The Jimmy Discount,’” the analyst continued. “People hate him. He’s not a great manager and he does stupid things. I think he bought Newsday with as much forethought as he bought Clearview Cinemas and the Whiz. I don’t think he ever gave a shit about journalism. But I think there are tax reasons why Newsday will hang on as part of Cablevision for a while to come.”Last July, when Newsday announced that publisher Fred Groser was going to retire at the year’s end, New York Post media columnist Keith J. Kelly reported that his pending departure sparked “renewed speculation that parent Cablevision is readying the Long Island paper for a sale…” As it turned out, Kelly was wrong, but the rumors persist, fueled in March when Gordon McLeod was named publisher—the third one in the six years since the $4.4-billion cable operator bought Newsday.Asked about the stubborn scuttlebutt that the Long Island tabloid is again on the auction block, Newsday deferred to Cablevision.“As a matter of long-standing policy, we do not comment on rumors or speculation in the media,” a Cablevision spokeswoman said.In its recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, Cablevision reported that Newsday had suffered almost $150 million in operating losses over the last three years: $71.1 million in 2013, $47 million in 2012 and $31.7 million in 2011. According to Newsday’s most recent filing with the Alliance for Audited Media, the paper’s total average print circulation was approximately 255,000 on weekdays, about 251,000 on Saturdays and 313,000 on Sundays, representing a decline of a 6.4 percent, 5.3 percent and 5.6 percent, respectively, compared to a comparable period the year before.“You simply can’t take a cable company and a newspaper and expect them to play nicely together,” says Jaci Clement, the director of the nonprofit Fair Media Council, an LI media watchdog group. “The philosophies are different. The products are different. The cultures are different.”She said Cablevision’s ownership of Newsday has been a “lose-lose-lose situation” for the Island.“Newsday is treated like an addition, not as an integral part of the operation,” she said. “[It] has been diminished from being one of the best metro papers in the country… The public has no diversity in the news offered by Newsday and News12…. Cablevision financially supported a candidate that Newsday endorsed yet Newsday repeatedly failed to disclose Cablevision’s contributions. Journalistically, that’s so bad it’s off the charts.”But with Verizon FiOS a distant competitor—same goes for satellite TV—Cablevision is firmly in the driver’s seat and Long Islanders are just along for the ride.last_img read more

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Referral marketing survey: Identifying current strategies & programs for success

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Gillian HamesRewardStream recently partnered with Demand Metric to conduct a survey on the current state of referral marketing. Our goal for this study was to understand the interest in, and the success of, referral marketing in order to gain insights from which to derive our own referral marketing best practices.This study’s participants were primarily marketers in both B2B and B2C organizations. Participants represented a wide range of industry affiliations and are with companies whose total employment ranges from less than 25 to more than 15,000 employees. Responses were collected from those who reported having a referral marketing program and those that did not.For those that did report having a program, the study investigated its parameters and effectiveness. For those that reported not having a referral marketing program, the reasons why were investigated, along with future plans for implementing one.You can download the full report here. continue reading »last_img read more

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Time to clean the windshield and look ahead

first_img 12SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bob Dorsa Bob Dorsa is the President of the ACUMA (American Credit Union Mortgage Association) a professional trade association (co-founded by Dorsa in 1996). ACUMA is one of the most unique niche … Web: www.acuma.org Details Mortgage origination market share for credit unions rose significantly coming out of the financial crisis a few years ago. We celebrated increased business but wondered if credit unions could sustain their game—or would the “same old, same old” business practices of the Big Banks and Wall Street return to erode the gains we’ve made.The answer is a resounding “no.”Consumers in large numbers have begun to understand the difference between member-owned credit unions and stockholder-beholden banks. Confidence in credit unions continues to grow while trust in banks, especially their lending practices, still falters. And the banks themselves, subject to tighter regulation, have limited the loans they offer.Opportunity abounds for mortgage-lending credit unions that put their members first. During our ACUMA events, I see the best and brightest of our industry making the investment to hear new ideas and network with their peers. They want to find ways to get better.And although the rise in CU mortgage lending has proved to be more than a blip, to “get better” and continue to grow the business means planning for success. Yes, planning. And now—before 2017 budgets are set—is the right time for you to look ahead to 2017 (and beyond) with a positive attitude and a clear strategy.It isn’t just the refi boom anymore, and you can’t get by with a patchwork of temporary workers to pitch in when you’re busy, for instance, or contracting for outside help with the pipeline when it’s full. Sure, tighter regulations have also put an extra burden on your staff, but that isn’t going to go away any time soon, either.No it’s time to clean the windshield and look ahead to the destination instead of constantly checking the rear-view mirror.And looking ahead means planning for success—growth in lending, not contraction. To do so, you need to examine your delivery channels and sales strategy; you must also ensure a proper level of operational support.Think positive. Plan for growth (success) not just survival (status quo).To succeed in mortgage lending, you need to answer “yes” to these three questions:Are you confident your member’s experience is what the member wants?Is your sales and marketing strategy going to bring business in the door?Operationally, are you prepared to meet regulatory and investor requirements while effectively managing all of the risks associated with them?Do these three things right, and your credit union will reap the rewards.last_img read more

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New Nevis cabinet sworn in

first_img Share St Kitts-Nevis’ Prime Minister Dr Denzil Douglas (R) congratulates Premier Joseph Parry and at the swearing-in ceremony of NIA ministersCHARLESTOWN, Nevis — At a ceremony attended by the prime minister of St Kitts-Nevis, Dr Denzil Douglas, the five ministers of the Nevis Island Administration (NIA) were officially sworn in on Tuesday.Joseph Parry remains Premier and Minister of Finance, Statistics and Economic Planning, Education and Library Services, Human Resources, Tourism and Labour.Hensley Daniel will serve as the island’s Deputy Premier and Minister of Health, Gender, Social Affairs, Youth and Sports, Community Affairs, Trade, Industry, Culture and Telecommunications.Robelto Hector will serve as Minister of Communications, Works and Public Utilities, Posts, Physical Planning, Natural Resources, Environment, Agriculture, Lands, Housing, Cooperatives and Fisheries.Junior Minister, Carlisle Powell, will maintain his responsibilities for Communications, Works and Public Utilities, Posts, Physical Planning, Natural Resources and Environment while fellow Junior Minister, Dwight Cozier, was sworn in to retain responsibility for the Ministry of Trade and Industry with special focus on Trade, Consumer Affairs, Industry, Import and Export Control.Following the oath of allegiance, oath of office and oath of secrecy, Parry delivered an address outlining some of his administration’s plans for the next five years. The re-elected leader also spoke of the anti-crime initiatives and policies that will take effect.“My party fully understands that our first duty is to keep our citizens safe. This is a sacred duty: a duty that stands at the apex of our national responsibilities and endeavours,” Parry said, as he issued a unity challenge to the people of Nevis.“I implore all citizens of goodwill to band themselves together, to put your shoulders to the wheel in order for us to accomplish this great endeavour of stamping out crime. United in this great cause, we shall prevail,” he said.According to Parry, the NIA “would be harsh on crime and criminals” in order to ensure that “the safety and security of Nevisians will always be the number one priority.”In turn, Douglas congratulated the Nevis Reformation Party (NRP) team on being elected to a second term in office and said that, although his administration had worked, for many years with the former Concerned Citizens Movement (CCM) government, he was particularly pleased with the bond established between his St Kitts-Nevis Labour Party-led administration and that of the NRP.“I’ve had the support of the people and the blessings of God to work not only with the NRP government for [the] people of Nevis but also with the CCM government on behalf of the people of Nevis. They have been 16 beautiful years but I say to you this evening, that the last five years in particular have been positive and progressive five years with the NRP,” Douglas said.Caribbean News Now Sharing is caring! 47 Views   no discussions NewsRegional New Nevis cabinet sworn in by: – July 14, 2011center_img Tweet Share Sharelast_img read more

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Gustin takes XSAN Hawkeye Dirt Tour checkers at Benton County

first_imgVINTON, Iowa (Aug. 18) – Richie Gustin raced to his career seventh XSAN Hawkeye Dirt Tour feature win on the night Tyler Droste nearly raced to his first.Gustin caught Droste with two circuits left in Monday’s 30-lapper for IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds, then pulled ahead to take the $1,000 checkers by four car lengths. He’s now the eighth different winner in as many tour events this season.Defending series champion Ronn Lauritzen, early leader Vern Jackson and Joe Docekal completed the top five.Jackson started outside the front row and led the first 19 laps. Droste had drawn the pole and wasn’t much more than half a car length off the pace much of that distance.Getting a good run out of the fourth turn, Droste took the lead on lap 20, right before a quick succession of three yellow flags.Gustin sped along the lower line. After a restart with four laps left, he went to the top side of the oval and finally caught up with Droste with two to go.Newly-qualified for the 2015 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational ballot, Gustin is the winningest driver in tour history.The ninth of 10 events on the 2014 XSAN Hawkeye Dirt Tour schedule is Tuesday, Aug. 19 at Cedar County Raceway in Tipton. That feature also pays $1,000 to win and is an All-Star ballot qualifier.Pit gates open at 4:30 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 5:30 p.m. Hot laps are at 6:30 p.m. and racing starts at 7 p.m.Also winning Monday features at Vinton were Damon Murty in the IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars, Tony Olson in the Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods and Justin Wacha in the IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks.Feature results – 1. Richie Gustin, Gilman; 2. Tyler Droste, Waterloo; 3. Ronn Lauritzen, Jesup; 4. Vern Jackson, Waterloo; 5. Joe Docekal, Dysart; 6. Jeremy Mills, Garner; 7. J.D. Auringer, Waterloo; 8. Kyle Brown, Kellogg; 9. Mike Van Genderen, Newton; 10. Joel Rust, Grundy Center; 11. Jesse Sobbing, Glenwood; 12. Cayden Carter, Oskaloosa; 13. Jeff Waterman, Quincy, Ill.; 14. Derek Reimer, Marshalltown; 15. Troy Cordes, Dunkerton; 16. Jacob Murray, Hartford; 17. Zach Less, Hopkinton; 18. Scott Hogan, Vinton; 19. Tyler Groenendyk, Oskaloosa; 20. Jesse Belez, Marengo; 21. Trent Jackson, Marshalltown; 22. Patrick Flannagan, Cedar Rapids.1st heat (top four redraw) – 1. Auringer; 2. Gustin; 3. Brown; 4. Rust; 5. Waterman; 6. Reimer; 7. Cordes; 8. Sobbing. 2nd heat – 1. Docekal; 2. Mills; 3. Groenendyk; 4. Vern Jackson; 5. Less; 6. Murray; 7. Trent Jackson. 3rd heat – 1. Droste; 2. Flannagan; 3. Lauritzen; 4. Van Genderen; 5. Hogan; 6. Belez; 7. Carter.Stock Cars – 1. Damon Murty, Chelsea; 2. Scott Pippert, Elberon; 3. Norman Chesmore, Rowley; 4. Justin Stander, Shellsburg; 5. Mike Galli, Urbana; 6. Ryan Coleman, Vinton; 7. Adam Gebel, Cedar Falls; 8. Mitchell Evens, Independence.Northern SportMods – 1. Tony Olson, Cedar Rapids; 2. Kip Siems, Cedar Falls; 3. Sam Wieben, Dysart; 4. Kyle Olson, Cedar Rapids; 5. Troy Burkhart, Urbana; 6. Jenae Gustin, Marshalltown; 7. Curt Hilmer, Dysart; 8. Austin Kaplan, Ankeny; 9. Jim Buhlman, Cedar Falls; 10. Dave Schulze, Keystone; 11. Matt Petrzelka, Norway; 12. Ross Neal, Marion; 13. Joey Schaefer, Waterloo; 14. Dave Burrell, Dysart; 15. Ryan King, Montour; 16. Danny Dvorak, Vinton; 17. Colby Heishman, Brooklyn.Hobby Stocks – 1. Justin Wacha, Vinton; 2. Jacob Keiser, Marengo; 3. Brian Happel, Vinton; 4. Matt Pohlman, Keystone; 5. Scott Siems, Cedar Rapids.last_img read more

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