The Fans Have Spoken! Your Gravity-Defying Top 10 Stephen Schwartz Songs

first_img“Morning Glow,” Pippin From Godspell to Wicked, Stephen Schwartz’s songs never fail to enchant. The “Popular” composer celebrated his birthday on March 6, and we took a look back at all the magic he’s done. With 10 musicals under his belt, Schwartz nabbed his first Tony nomination in ’73 for Pippin. In honor of the composer’s big day, we asked you to rank his best tunes on Culturalist.com. Here are your top 10 favorite Stephen Schwartz songs! “For Good,” Wicked “Dancing Through Life,” Wicked “Magic to Do,” Pippin (Photos: Joan Marcus) “I’m Not That Girl,” Wicked “Corner of the Sky,” Pippin “Popular,” Wicked “Defying Gravity,” Wicked “As Long As You’re Mine,” Wicked “What Is This Feeling,” Wicked View Commentslast_img read more

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Caroline Bowman to Replace Jenn Colella in Vancouver’s Evita

first_img Vancouver’s already got “A New Argentina”—or at least a new First Lady. Caroline Bowman will replace Jenn Colella in Vancouver Opera’s upcoming production of Evita. A spokesperson for the show said the change was owing to “a scheduling conflict.” As previously announced, this incarnation of the Tim Rice and Andrew Lloyd Webber tuner will also star Ramin Karimloo as Che. Directed by Kelly Robinson, the production is scheduled to play a limited engagement April 30 through May 8 at the Queen Elizabeth Theatre.The “High Flying, Adored” Bowman’s Broadway credits include Elphaba in Wicked and the original cast of Kinky Boots. She starred as Eva Peron in the 2013-14 Evita tour; other theater credits include Spamalot, Fame and Grease.Evita charts the rise and fall of Peron, the one-time charismatic and glamorous young First Lady of Argentina, and includes songs such as “Buenos Aires,” “Another Suitcase in Another Hall” and “Don’t Cry for Me Argentina.” The musical nabbed seven Tony awards (including Best Musical) in 1980; a 2012 Great White Way revival was led by Ricky Martin.Find out why Bowman thinks Evita is “everything you want in a musical” below. Star Files View Comments Caroline Bowman(Photo: Caitlin McNaney) Caroline Bowmanlast_img read more

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Food Manual.

first_imgPersonal care homes can be a blessing for elderly people and others who can’t quite take care of themselves.But they can be a challenge for the people who prepare the meals. Most personal care homes in Georgia are small, with 15 or fewer people. It’s like cooking for a big family of people with widely varied dietary needs. “Nutritious meals and snacks are an important part of maintaining good health and managing chronic diseases,” said Elizabeth Andress. “Food is a source of personal pleasure, too. And meals and snacks offer times for socialization.” Andress is an Extension Service food, nutrition and health scientist with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. She led a team of extension authors in writing the “Food Service Manual for Use in Personal Care Homes,” a nutrition and meal-planning guide just being released. “We wrote the manual to be a quick, useful handbook for those who plan, prepare and serve food in small personal care homes,” Andress said. It focuses both on good nutrition and on food safety. The manual came out of a project of UGA Extension agents in Cobb, DeKalb and Fulton counties. The agents had all trained metro Atlanta personal care home providers for many years. In 1996, the agents received the Kraft Media Grant from the National Extension Association of Family and Consumer Sciences to fund the project. Andress and the agent team wrote the manual. UGA foods and nutrition faculty reviewed it. So did professionals in the Long Term Care Ombudsman Program of Georgia, the Atlanta Regional Commission and the Georgia Department of Human Resources. Finally, a number of personal care homes in the three Atlanta counties used a draft of the manual for four to five weeks. A focus group from those providers gave feedback for last-minute improvements. At $10, the manual comes as a three-hole-punched loose-leaf notebook without a binder. It has chapters on nutrition and meal planning. It gives tips for feeding people with a range of special problems. It tells how to save money buying foods, and how to buy, prepare and store foods safely. The guide tells how to prepare for long power failures. It even includes a section of weights, measures, substitutions and other helps for using or changing recipes. To order the manual, contact your county Extension Service office. Or call (706) 542-8999.last_img read more

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‘Forages 2001.’

first_imgGeorgia farmers raise livestock in every county in the state, and providing forages for all those animals isn’t easy. University of Georgia scientists and other experts will provide a wealth of information on the topic in “Forages 2001,” a two-day workshop in Tifton, Ga., May 22-23.The workshop will begin with an 8 a.m. country breakfast. The opening morning’s sessions will cover perennial and annual grasses and legumes and where they fit in a forage plan.Other sessions will cover poisonous plants, weed identification and forage testing and quality. Participants will learn how to interpret a quality analysis from any lab and make recommendations.County Agent CompetitionThe afternoon will end with a field tour from 3:15 to 6:15 p.m. After supper and entertainment, the evening will end with a roundtable competition of county agent presentations on successful forage programs.Wednesday morning will open with a country breakfast at 7 a.m. Sessions on pasture ecology, starting at 8 a.m., will cover management impacts on water quality and regulations on solid waste application.The workshop will end with sessions on forages for wildlife nutrition, plantings and practices.CCA, Pesticide CreditsParticipants will be eligible for 9.5 Certified Crop Advisor credits. Pesticide License Recertification credits have been applied for in Georgia, Alabama and Florida.A $10 registration fee covers the workshop costs. An optional golf tournament fee is $30. The deadline to register is May 14. For more information or a registration form, call the Tifton conference office at (229) 386-3416.Rooms have been blocked at the Holiday Inn for $45 plus 12-percent tax. (To get this rate, mention “Forages 2001.”)last_img read more

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What’s it worth?

first_imgBy Brad HaireUniversity of Georgia You may have heard that the U.S. dollar is either weak or strong. But what does this mean, really?”It’s all relative,” said Don Shurley, an agricultural economist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.The ExchangeBeing weaker or stronger is about how much of a country’s currency you can buy using another country’s currency at any time, relative to what you could buy at a previous time.Take the U.S. dollar, for example. How many Japanese yens or Pakistani rupees can you get for a single U.S. dollar? On Oct. 28, you could’ve gotten about 59 Pakistani rupees or 123 yens for 1 U.S. dollar.This is called the exchange rate. And it changes all the time, 24 hours a day.How are exchange rates decided? The short answer, Shurley said, is good old supply and demand.Piece of the ActionSay the U.S. economy is strong and the return on investment looks good in the United States. In this scenario, foreign investors want a piece of the action. But they have to have U.S. dollars to invest or to do business here.These investors might pay more, using their currency, for the U.S. dollars they need to make the investments. They then take their country’s currency and convert it into U.S. dollars.”When they put their money into U.S. dollars, it drives the dollar value up relative to their country’s currency,” Shurley said. It works both ways. U.S. investors investing in other countries affect the value of those countries’ currencies compared to the U.S. dollar.Strong DollarThe U.S. dollar has been said to be strong over the past few years. So, what’s better? A strong or weak U.S. dollar?A strong U.S. dollar can buy more of another country’s currency and products in the United States. A U.S. citizen can buy more in another country on vacation.But, remember. It’s relative.The strong U.S. dollar also makes it harder for other countries’ citizens to vacation in the United States and to buy U.S. products in their markets. This can hurt parts of the U.S. economy.Weak PricesFor example, the strong U.S. dollar is one reason cotton prices have been so low for U.S. farmers in recent years. It has also hurt the nation’s textile industry, which turns cotton into shirts, jeans and other clothes.The strong U.S. dollar, according to the National Cotton Council, has made it hard for U.S.-made textile items to compete in foreign markets. And it has allowed cheaper foreign-made textiles to dominate the U.S. market.So, the American textile industry has shrunk over the past few years. It can no longer handle the amount of cotton it used to, Shurley said.In 1997, U.S. textile firms could economically make enough clothes and cotton items to use about 11 million bales of cotton. In 1999, that dropped to 10 million. This year, they will need only about 7.5 million.As a result, U.S. cotton farmers have to sell their cotton abroad. This year, U.S. farmers will grow about 18 million bales of cotton. (A bale is about 480 pounds of lint.) Of this, about 11 million will have to be exported, he said.But to compete on the world market, U.S. exporters have to drop their prices to compete, sometimes below what it cost to grow the crop in the United States.It’s been reported that the dollar weakened over the summer. This could affect the U.S. economy, the world economy, cotton farmers and you. But we’ll have to wait and see. It’s all relative.last_img read more

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Cook those veggies!

first_imgBy Cat HolmesUniversity of GeorgiaCook those green onions. That’s the word from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and food safety experts following recent hepatitis A virus outbreaks in Georgia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Pennsylvania that have been associated with raw or undercooked green onions.With Americans eating more produce than ever, it’s important to wash it thoroughly and cook it whenever possible.”There has been a tremendous increase in fresh produce consumption,” said Michael Doyle, director of the University of Georgia Center for Food Safety and an international authority on foodborne bacterial pathogens. “It’s doubled in the last 20 years.”More people eating more fresh produce, however, has resulted in more cases of illnesses linked to contaminated produce.In the case of the recent hepatitis A virus outbreak in Tennessee, the green onions were traced to Mexico. But Doyle cautions against singling out Mexican produce.”You don’t want to condemn all produce from Mexico,” he said. “There are major U.S. growers with production farms in Mexico and these operations are very controlled. Produce from these fields is as safe as any grown in the United States.”Where it comes fromHepatitis A virus, like Norovirus, is always the result of contamination by infected humans.”The only reservoir of HAV is humans,” Doyle said. “The virus is found in the stools of infected humans. Feces from carriers of HAV can contaminate food and water.”When large HAV outbreaks occur, it’s usually caused by a restaurant food handler with poor hygienic practices, Doyle said, or polluted water contaminating foods.This highlights the importance of practicing good hygiene and good food-handling practices: Wash your hands, and cook your food.Get cookingThe easiest way to avoid potential HAV exposure in green onions is to cook them.”Cooking is the best way to minimize the risk of HAV infection,” Doyle said. “Washing won’t eliminate foodborne pathogens, but it can bring the level down so that it doesn’t cause problems. People who are severely immune-compromised should only eat cooked produce.”Freshly prepared salsa and green salads are often made with green onions. When you are eating out at restaurants, the FDA recommends that you specifically request that raw or lightly cooked green onions not be added to your food.Since contamination is typically on the surface, Doyle also suggests peeling fruits and vegetables such as bananas, apples, carrots when possible. In the case of iceberg lettuce or cabbage, remove the outer two layers of leaves.About hepatitis AHepatitis A infection takes an average of about a month to appear, which means the symptoms can develop weeks after exposure.According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, adults are more likely to have symptoms than children.Symptoms usually occur abruptly. They may include fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Symptoms usually last less than two months. A few people, though, are ill for as long as six months. There is no chronic infection with HAV.Vaccines are available for long-term prevention of hepatitis A. They’re not recommended for children 2 years old or younger. According to the CDC Web site, the HAV vaccine was more widely used in the late 1990s and the number of cases reached historic lows.Cat Holmes is a news editor for the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.last_img read more

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Control Plant Diseases

first_imgThe same fungal, bacteria and viral diseases that affect vegetable farmers can have the same detrimental impact on backyard gardeners’ spring and fall gardens.Whether it’s a disease like phytophthora that strikes in wet years or a virus like tomato yellow leaf curl that thrives during warmer conditions, these common pests can undermine months of hard work. To avoid these culprits, University of Georgia Extension vegetable horticulturist Timothy Coolong encourages gardeners to select vegetable varieties that are resistant to common diseases and to look for signs of disease early in the season. “There are some chemicals available to the homeowner, but they are generally not nearly as effective as those available to commercial growers,” Coolong said. “Because of that and (because) of the extreme insect and disease pressure we have, homeowners are probably going to want to combine a resistant variety with a spray program.”Tomato varieties with resistance to nematodes or fusarium and verticillium wilt are commonly available for home gardens. Most plants or seeds will have a disease resistance labeling that includes code letters for certain diseases. This can be a useful tool to help gardeners grow a more successful crop. Viral diseases tend to be more prevalent in the fall because of increased populations of insects that transmit plant diseases such as thrips, whiteflies and aphids. But these diseases can also damage tomatoes and many other popular garden vegetables like squash and cucumbers, Coolong said. “Once you get these viruses in a plant, there’s not much you can do about them,” he said. “Really the best way to manage those viruses is to control the insect vector, or to incorporate resistance to those viruses into the crop.” Viruses aren’t as much of a problem during the spring because cooler weather keeps insects less active. But gardeners should plan ahead to control aphids, thrips and white flies or plant resistant varieties. For some crops, like yellow squash, there are several good virus resistant varieties available.Before buying seeds or transplants, visit the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences publication website at caes.uga.edu/publications to find varieties recommended for each part of the state and see which diseases to guard against. Search by vegetable to find the proper publication. For more gardening help, call your local UGA Extension office at 1-800-ASKUGA1.last_img read more

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Food Retail Revolution

first_imgRoughly 20 years ago, online grocers promised to affordably and conveniently deliver groceries to homes.Several of these companies had successful initial public offerings before the entire industry more or less went bankrupt and disappeared. Although the lesson of the failed first attempt at food retail sector technological revolution was clear, firms have continued to make forays into that space, which have created a stream of failures. Traditional grocers are now preparing to harness technology in new ways and are ready to unleash a new food tech revolution that’s more likely to succeed.Through technology, food retailers know exactly what’s on the shelves and what’s on the way, and they can adjust prices without relabeling every box, can or bottle. All this information is available at stores and at headquarters.This technology is important because food retail profit margins are exceedingly low. They average around 2 percent. That means new, online grocers find it hard to undercut supermarkets and food retailers on price.Further, the advanced logistics and technology currently used by traditional food retailers mean that online retailers don’t have an information technology advantage.Even though online food retail has failed repeatedly and lost several billion dollars in venture capital, a second-generation revolution in online food retail is underway. This revolution promises even more technology, more online shopping and new, hybrid models of food retail.This revolution, unlike the first, which was spearheaded by new entrants, is being led by existing industry leaders. For this reason, in addition to lessons learned from the many failures so far, the second-generation revolution is likely to succeed.New technology applications are perfectly represented by Kroger’s new, wide rollout of personal scanners. Shoppers use their own scanner, provided by Kroger, or a smartphone app to scan items as they place them in their shopping cart.The shopper can see the cost of each item and their running total. When they leave the store, their groceries are automatically charged to the credit or debit card they chose to link to their account.Existing phone apps can map trips through stores based on shopping lists and can direct and alert the shopper to items on the list using the phone’s GPS capability. These apps have been tested by a number of supermarket chains.In addition to e-commerce firms such as Amazon, brick-and-mortar supermarkets are giving online food retail another try. Walmart is clearly signaling its desire to meet Amazon in cyberspace. Other traditional supermarkets are also offering online sales that are often fulfilled from the local store’s shelves and delivered to shoppers’ homes very quickly for a small (say $10) fee.These new, hybrid models of food retail appear to be the most important part of this revolution, leveraging brick-and-mortar stores, not eliminating them. When traditional supermarkets fulfill online sales from existing stores, they avoid adding any expenses for new warehouses or infrastructure.Walmart allows shoppers to order groceries online and pick them up curbside. Walmart emails the customer when the order is ready, then the customer drives up and employees load the groceries into the customer’s vehicle. The Amazon-Whole Foods merger will likely pave the way for customers to buy low-priced staples online from Amazon and pick them up at a local Whole Foods store, where they can also buy fresh produce, seafood and other items in person.All of these hybrid models will increase options and convenience for customers more than they will lower prices. Plus, these hybrids will offer consumers online convenience while preserving the opportunity to purchase specific items after personal inspection. Maintaining the “touch” aspect for some food items is an important advantage of these hybrid models.Earlier attempts to combine e-commerce and food retail generally ended in epic failure. The coming, second-generation revolution in food retail is being led not by startups, but by established retail leaders. By leveraging existing supply chains to add online retail, new technology or both, the food retail revolution has a much higher probability of success.This article was originally released on Jan. 3, 2018, on Forbes online.last_img read more

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Vineyard Tour

first_imgGeorgia’s wine industry has surged in size and popularity over the past decade, but this success didn’t happen overnight.This August, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension will host a first-of-its-kind northeast Georgia vineyard tour focusing on the cultivation practices and grape varieties that have made Georgia’s burgeoning wine industry possible.The tour, running from 9 a.m. to about 5 p.m. on Aug. 8, will visit four northeast Georgia wineries in White, Habersham and Lumpkin counties. Participants are urged to register before Aug. 3. The cost is $30 and includes lunch. The tour is sponsored in part by the White County Farmers Exchange.“We will showcase the UGA Extension Viticulture Team’s on-farm research trials and highlight unique commercial management strategies at each stop,” said Cain Hickey, viticulture specialist with UGA Extension. “We hope that registrants will leave with a greater depth of understanding about best management practices, as learned from both academic and industry personnel.”The tour is meant for beginning wine grape growers, experienced growers and those who are simply interested in Georgia’s wine industry.At each stop, vineyard owners, UGA Extension agents and viticulture experts from the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences will discuss the science and art of growing wine grapes.To register, contact Nathan Eason, White County Extension coordinator, at neason@uga.edu.For more details, visit site.extension.uga.edu/viticulture/2018/07/vineyard-tour-scheduled-for-august-8th/.last_img read more

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Youth group travel with Prep Traveler

first_imgPrep Traveler actively promotes, and is involved in youth group travel, a possibility for one and all! Prep Traveler can help arrange high-quality tours for culture, exchange, band and unique performance programs, graduation trips, spring break trips, youth missions or athletic team travel or sports tournaments. The open source efforts of Prep Traveler have resulted in exceptional travel experiences.Moreover, groups can share their travel experiences, mentioning area attractions and facilities for the benefit of aspiring explorers and vacationers. Once you’ve decided on your travel destination, Prep Traveler plans the perfect student group trip for you, without any hassles!With hundreds of destination reviews, performance venues, and educational travel opportunities, Prep Traveler is the only national resource for youth athletic groups to find suitable facilities for hosting their competitions. Prep Traveler goes a step ahead to fulfill your travel plans and helps you get started by developing unique fundraising resources.From arranging for cheap airline tickets, hotels, cars, cruises and vacations, Prep Traveler does it all! Photos, maps, and user reviews are a great help too. Prep Traveler is the ultimate in incorporating elements of adventure recreation, adventure education and adventure competition for youth groups, and is fast gaining popularity world-wide for its uniqueness.Youth group travel with Prep Traveler means fun and happy moments that will stay with you for a long time to come!last_img read more

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