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CVPS, DPS agree on 2.3 percent rate increase

first_imgCVPS, DPS agree on 2.3 percent rate increaseRUTLAND, Vt. (November 29, 2007) – Central Vermont Public Service (NYSE-CV) and the VermontDepartment of Public Service today agreed to a 2.3 percent rate increase to takeeffect with bills rendered in February. CVPS filed for a 4.46 percent rateincrease in May. The settlement must be approved by the Vermont Public ServiceBoard.”This settlement will provide CVPS with modest but adequate funds to improvecustomer service and reliability, while maintaining extremely competitive ratescompared to the rest of New England,” President Bob Young said. “Working withthe DPS, we were able to reduce our initial request while committing to makingsubstantial additional investments in tree trimming and system upgrades, whichwill benefit our customers.”Under the settlement, a residential customer using 500 kilowatt-hours per monthwould see an increase of $1.65, from $71.46 to $73.11 – still among the lowestin the Northeast.According to the Edison Electric Institute, many customers would pay far moreelsewhere in New England. Customers of Boston Edison and Connecticut Light andPower would pay over $100 for 500 kWh. An Nstar-Cambridge Electric customerwould pay more than $104, according to EEI.Young said internal cost controls and CVPS’s long-term power contracts withHydro-Quebec and Vermont Yankee have largely protected customers fromsignificant rate pressures facing many other utilities. While the number ofcustomers served by CVPS has increased from 143,500 in 1993 to 158,000 today,the number of employees has fallen from 750 employees in 1993 to 550 today.CVPS rates have increased only slightly in the past eight years, comprised ofjust a handful of small increases and decreases. The proposed rates would bejust 5.9 percent higher than rates in 1999. The Consumer Price Index has risen21 percent, while the CPI for energy has risen almost 85 percent between 1999and 2006.The rate settlement is intended to dovetail with a pending alternativeregulation plan filed by CVPS in August. The plan, which must be approved bythe PSB, includes mechanisms and incentives to encourage further cost controlsand efficiencies. In consultation with the DPS, CVPS plans to hire an outsideconsultant to conduct a business process review to determine where moreefficiencies might lie.”We want to keep rates as low as possible for our customers while providing themwith the kind of service, reliability and storm response they have come toexpect,” Young said. “This review and alternative regulation plan will help usdo that.”- 30 –last_img read more

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Trail Mix – Abigail Dowd

first_imgAbigail Dowd, on Not What I Seem, her new record, delved into her grandfather’s war experience, and the trickle down effect it had on familial relationships, on “Chosin,” a song inspired by the battle at Chosin Reservoir during the Korean War. AD – The title is from the Korean War battle at Chosin Reservoir. A couple of years ago, I learned that my grandfather had fought in that battle and it shined a new light on who he was. Writing that song, I saw parallels between the literal battle and our own internal battles. It also helped me let go of some of the stories, the harder memories, that I had of him and to appreciated the strength and toughness that he passed on, the grit to never give up. AD – Wow. Truthfully, I can’t imagine. He never spoke about the war. Writing this song, it became clear that trauma can be passed down through generations, and I realized that I’ve carried some of it without ever living it myself. Letting go of that in the process of writing, I’d like to imagine ripples through our family in unseen and healing ways. I just hope that, wherever he is, his soul is resting peacefully. Trail Mix is happy to feature that song this month, and I was lucky enough to catch up with Abigail to chat up the new record and the power of that song as she reflected on her grandfather. North Carolina songwriter Abigail Dowd and I have something in common. You can catch Abigail Dowd live this weekend at Lost Province Brewing Company on Saturday and then in Greensboro at Lucky 32 Southern Kitchen. Both of us have grandfathers we love who served in the Korean War. BRO – I read that you have spent some time studying anthropology. How does your work in that field impact your songwriting? And both were tight lipped about their service and experience. BRO – Care to ponder on what your grandfather would say the first time he heard it? AD – For sure. I think sometimes we define ourselves by what others see of us, whether it’s being beautiful or smart or some other attribute, and then we realize we are much more than that. Sometimes it’s hard to show all of ourselves, how complex we are, or to be seen beyond the surface.center_img BRO – We are featuring “Chosin” on this month’s Trail Mix. What’s the story behind the song? BRO – I love the title of the new record. I think that might be a little true for everyone. Thoughts? BRO – Have you played “Chosin” for any Korean War veterans? AD – I think anthropology has a big impact. Seeing different world views or someone else through their own lens, learning each others’ languages in order to communicate, or finding universal connection in a story are all things that carry over into my songwriting. I love looking at ways that place – especially nature – are reflected in the arts and music we create. The song “Wiregrasser” is an example. I couldn’t have written that song if I hadn’t grown up in the longleaf pine region, hearing stories of turpentine workers. It was fun to pull those stories into a song and write from the wiregrassers’ perspective. And be sure to check out “Chosin,” along with new tunes from Ian Noe, Ona, Lucette, and many more on this month’s Trail Mix. For more information on Abigail Dowd, how you can grab a copy of Not What I Seem, or when you can catch her live, be sure to check our her website. https://youtu.be/RhQ9U9rt64c You can also check out the brand new video for “Wiregrasser,” a tribute to North Carolina’s turpentine workers, right here! AD – I haven’t, but recently someone in the audience told me that his father fought in the Army unit at Chosin, as did my grandfather. We could only assume that they may have known each other and it was a strong connection to make with someone.last_img read more

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USSOUTHCOM to Participate in Fused Response

first_img The U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) announced its participation in Exercise Fused Response in Guyana on February 28. This year’s exercise runs March 1-9 and includes U.S. Special Operations Command-South and Guyanese Defence Forces who will train together to improve skills in areas such as communications, planning, reconnaissance and other joint training specialties. Fused Response training will improve the skills of both Guyana and U.S. Forces to better respond to security challenges and to provide effective and cooperative disaster relief and humanitarian assistance. The exercise will also enhance both nations’ collective ability to combat regional threats including terrorism, illicit trafficking, and organized crime. Fused Response is an annual SOUTHCOM-sponsored multi-lateral exercise involving a combined contingent of U.S. and partner-nation forces. About 350 U.S. military personnel will join approximately 125 Guyanese troops to train in Guyana at the invitation of the Guyanese government. Guyanese and U.S. forces frequently train together, and Fused Response will build on this existing relationship and serve as a positive example of strengthening partnerships in the region. By Dialogo February 29, 2012last_img read more

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The Pru gets behind Bars

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Hampshire, Dorset and south Wiltshire

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PREMIUMMilitary reserve looks to millennials despite criticisms

first_img#military military military-reserve-component #military-reserve-component millennials #millenials Facebook Google The Defense Ministry plans to start recruiting young people to become military reservists sometime in the middle of this year, as an implementation of the 2019 law on the management of national resources for state defense, despite criticisms.According to the law, the military reserve is a voluntary service that can be mobilized to strengthen the Indonesian Military (TNI) when it is dealing with armed threats. The law, which was enacted last September, stipulates that citizens aged between 18 and 35 years have the right to participate in the program under the condition they pass a number of tests and be on call until they are 48. They are also required to undergo basic military training for three months.The ministry is now seeking millennials aged 18 and above to enroll in the program, according to the ministry’s defense potential general director, Bondan Tiara Sofyan. It is e… LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Topics : Linkedin Forgot Password ? Log in with your social accountlast_img read more

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EU leaders struggle for unified virus response

first_imgThey will also rubber stamp the suspension of EU deficit rules that will allow countries to spend freely to fight the virus regardless of deficits.The 27 leaders will in addition task EU officials to start work on an “exit strategy” and recovery plan to help rebuild the economy after the havoc wrought by COVID-19 and the drastic shutdown measures taken to fight it. ‘Indecently ideological’In their own call for EU solidarity, nine EU leaders ahead of the talks said any economic plan should include the launch of joint borrowing by members of the euro single currency.But that proposal was rejected behind the scenes by Germany, the Netherlands and other rich northern bloc members, who slam it as indecently “ideological” during a health crisis.France, Spain and Italy have long called for a some kind of eurobond, that is in effect joint borrowing by the 19 members of the euro single currency.They say it could serve as the bedrock of a safer and more unified European economy and would become a globally respected asset on par with the US Treasury bills.But wealthier members see the eurobond as an attempt by over-spending southerners to take advantage of cheap borrowing prices afforded Germany and other paragons of balanced budgets.Thursday’s summit will also take stock of measures taken across the bloc to promote the search for a vaccine.Europe has become the heart of the pandemic, with the death tolls in both Italy and Spain overtaking that of China, where the disease first emerged. “When Europe really needed to be there for each other, too many initially looked out for themselves,” European Commission chief Ursula von der Leyen said ahead of the talks.”When Europe really needed an ‘all for one’ spirit, too many initially gave an ‘only for me’ response,” she added, speaking at a sparsely attended session of European Parliament.The former German defense minister said Brussels was now trying to build a more singular approach and leaders will use video talks to put that into action.According to a draft statement, measures should include building an emergency stock of medical equipment and easing inter-EU border closures. EU leaders on Thursday will try to unify Europe’s scattershot response to the COVID-19 outbreak that has crippled Europe, with France and Italy calling for “corona bonds” to help jump start the economy.Hundreds of millions of EU citizens are holed up in lockdowns to help slow the pandemic that has killed more than ten thousand Europeans, mainly in Italy, Spain and France.Early on, member states privileged national responses by shutting borders, hoarding medical supplies and waving through major spending plans regardless of EU rules. Topics :last_img read more

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Classic-style sanctuary with ocean views

first_imgInside the home at 775 Esplanade St, Lota.“We were very particular with all the inclusions and little details to (stay faithful) to that Hamptons style,” Mr Lovric said. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 2020“A lot of people try to build this style of home but hold back on the features due to costs, but if you want to pull it off, you can’t half do it.“We’re really happy with the result. We built it for ourselves and we love everything we put into the home. We would love to stay but our circumstances have changed.” The home at 775 Esplanade St, Lota.THIS Hamptons-style builder’s home comes with high-end inclusions, dual living potential and bay views. Owners Boris and Valeria Lovric, the couple behind Lovric Projects Queensland, built the two-storey beauty at 775 Esplanade, Lota, as their dream home. A change in circumstances means the couple has decided to put the new home on the market. Mr Lovric said he and his wife chose the Hamptons look because it complemented the Queenslander style. Inside the home at 775 Esplanade St, Lota.Mr Lovric said the best thing about the home was the stunning views of Moreton Bay from the upstairs living area and deck, followed by the kitchen.Set across two levels, the hub of the home is upstairs, where the open-plan living, dining and kitchen area leads through bi-fold doors to the big deck. The kitchen has stone benchtops, custom lighting and a butler’s pantry.center_img The outdoor area at 775 Esplanade St, Lota.The master bedroom includes a walk-in robe, bay window and an ensuite with a bath and separate toilet. Downstairs, the three bedrooms have built-in robes and there is a bathroom, laundry and family room with a kitchenette that leads to a deck.Mr Lovric said the layout of the home meant it could work for all types of buyers, from couples to extended families.last_img read more

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TPR’s new DC code ‘a huge boost’ for responsible investment

first_imgThe UK’s pension regulator (TPR) has released a revised code of practice, and supporting guides, for trustees of defined contribution (DC) pension schemes, with its guidance on the consideration of environmental, social and governance (ESG) factors one of the aspects welcomed.The new code is effective as of today and is aimed at trustees of occupational trust-based schemes that offer some form of money purchase benefits. There were around 36,000 in the UK as at March 2016, including hybrid schemes, TPR noted.Andrew Warwick-Thompson, executive director for regulatory policy at the regulator, said: “Millions of people are being auto-enrolled into DC pensions, so it’s essential that schemes are being managed to a high standard. “In revising the code, we have responded to calls from the pensions industry to shorten and simplify it, with an increased focus on legislative requirements.” The release of the code comes after the regulator launched a wide-ranging consultation on trustee standards and governance, and suggested “sub-standard” pension funds should be forced to merge with others.The code sets out the standards TPR expects trustees to meet when complying with the law, with accompanying guides providing information on how these can be met in practice.The new code was put before Parliament in May after a consultation.It updates the code from 2013 to reflect recent legislation, including 2015 regulations on charges and governance for occupational pension schemes, TPR’s experience in regulating DC schemes, and evolved market practice.The code is set out in six sections, addressing areas such as scheme management skills, investment governance and “value for members”.Responsible investment organisations welcomed TPR’s comments on how ESG factors should be taken into account as part of investment governance.ESG campaign organisation ShareAction said the code and supporting guides improved guidance for trustees on ESG, while the UK Sustainable Investment and Finance Association (UKSIF) said TPR’s important clarification was a “huge boost for responsible investment in the UK”.  In the code itself, TPR states that, “when setting investment strategies, we expect trustee boards to take account of risks affecting the long-term financial sustainability of the investments”.The accompanying guide elaborates on this and other aspects of investment governance, such as fiduciary management.It summarises the Law Commission’s guidance on how trustees should consider financial and non-financial factors, and gives examples of risks that could affect DC schemes’ investments over the long term, such as those relating to climate change or “unsustainable” business practices.In this guide, TPR states: “You should bear in mind that most investments in DC schemes are long term and are therefore exposed to the longer-term financial risks.”UKSIF said the regulator’s guidance “represents the first time the Law Commission’s review has been reflected in regulation or legislation since it was published in 2014”.In November last year, the UK government decided against changing the law on trustees’ fiduciary duties following the Law Commission’s suggestions the year before.Rachel Howarth, policy officer at ShareAction, said TPR’s decision to include the guidance was “extremely encouraging”.“The guidance for pension trustees is clear,” she added. “They have a mandate to consider all risks that could affect the financial performance of their funds, and this includes ESG risks.”Care urged on fiduciary managementOther industry experts highlighted the importance the updated code places on investment governance and administration, or seeking legal advice, particularly in investment matters.Rona Train, partner at Hyman Robertson, drew attention to the regulator’s guidance on fiduciary management, saying it suggested it was “keen to head off similar issues in the DC world to those we have seen in DB”, where many trustees have appointed their existing investment consultant as the fiduciary manager without considering other providers.In its guide supporting the section in the code on investment governance, the regulator said: “Note that the skills a successful investment consultant needs are not exactly the same as those a successful fiduciary manager needs.”It also flagged the potential for conflicts of interest of the various parties involved in choosing a fiduciary manager, including the existing investment consultant and third-party advisers.Hymans Robertson commented on the regulator’s guidance on trustees’ legal requirement to assess “value for members”, arguing that wider industry comparisons were needed to help them do this effectively.Train noted that TPR had called on large schemes to “use information-sharing through their consultants and professional trustees as one way of assessing value”.,WebsitesWe are not responsible for the content of external sitesLink to TPR 2015 code of practice for occupational trust-based DC schemeslast_img read more

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