Walmart launches 98 annual subscription for grocery deliveries

first_imgStory TimelineWalmart aims at Amazon with no cost NextDay deliveryWalmart Onn Android tablets try to beat Amazon at its own gameWalmart InHome Delivery will test your trust issues to the max READ: Target takes on Amazon with same-day delivery for online ordersGrocery deliveries are exactly what they sound like — a way for consumers to shop through a company’s mobile app, pay using the app, and then wait for someone to bring the groceries to their door. The service is vital for those who are unable to leave their homes and a massive convenience for everyone else, but there is a downside: the delivery fee.Depending on the company used, each food order may come with a flat shipping fee somewhere between $5 and $10; other services require customers to sign up for a plan and pay a flat monthly fee to get a certain number of deliveries every month. Walmart Grocery, the company’s online food shopping service, offers both a flat $9.95 fee for a single delivery and a $12.95/month rate for monthly subscriptions.AdChoices广告As first spied by TechCrunch, Walmart also added a $98 annual subscription to its grocery delivery service, enabling customers who regularly get grocery deliveries to save money over the course of a full year. The new plan is called Delivery Unlimited, and as its name suggests, subscribers can order whatever groceries they need and the packages will be delivered with no additional costs. The rate is one dollar less than Shipt’s annual $99 plan, which Target customers must get if they want otherwise free deliveries under the retailer’s new same-day delivery service. It’s unclear at this time how many regions are covered by Walmart’s new Delivery Unlimited service. The option to order and pay through the app, then pick up the order at a Walmart store remains free. The grocery delivery market is heating up and that’s good news for consumers. Days after Target launched same-day deliveries for online purchases in most of the United States, Walmart has expanded its own alternative to include a new $98 annual subscription for grocery deliveries. The annual subscription is a discount over the flat rate and monthly plan options Walmart already offered.last_img read more

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Viewpoints Insuring Medical Treatments Are Well Researched GOP Govs Reluctance On Exchanges

first_imgViewpoints: Insuring Medical Treatments Are Well Researched; GOP Govs Reluctance On Exchanges May Backfire The New York Times: Testing What We Think We Know By 1990, many doctors were recommending hormone replacement therapy to healthy middle-aged women and P.S.A. screening for prostate cancer to older men. Both interventions had become standard medical practice. But in 2002, a randomized trial showed that preventive hormone replacement caused more problems (more heart disease and breast cancer) than it solved. … Then, in 2009, trials showed that P.S.A. screening led to many unnecessary surgeries and had a dubious effect on prostate cancer deaths (Dr. H. Gilbert Welch, 8/19). Bloomberg: Republican Governors Should Want Homemade ExchangesEven though the Health and Human Services Department staffers who are working on plans for the federally imposed exchanges are trying their best to get input from insurance officials in every state, they will be hard-pressed to design unique exchanges for each of the states that refuse to design their own. It’s more likely that the federally operated exchanges will have a one-size-fits-all quality. And this will make the states’ health-insurance systems more difficult and costly to administer (Elena Marks, 8/19). Politico: A Health Mandate Businesses Might Like The health reform law may have been upheld by the Supreme Court, but it won’t alter the alarming fact that employee health costs have exploded to become the third largest expense in business today, eroding the financial health of thousands of companies. That’s because the cause of this health cost crisis has nothing to do with the health law, but is instead due to the declining health of the American worker. A recent study found that an astonishing 86 percent of all full-time employees in the U.S. — that’s six of every seven workers — are now either overweight or have a chronic (but usually preventable) health condition that significantly raises their health costs (Darrell Moon, 8/20). Los Angeles Times: A Flawed Medi-Cal Fix The state Senate’s top Democrat, Darrell Steinberg, is making a last-minute push for a bill that would allow some injured people to seek recovery for medical bills that are larger than what their doctors and hospitals actually collected. The goal, Steinberg says, is to generate more money for Medi-Cal, the state’s version of Medicaid. Indeed, state and federal laws have made it difficult for Medi-Cal to recover much of what it spends on medical care even when the victims win judgments against the people who injured them. But Steinberg wants to solve that problem the wrong way (8/17). The Dallas Morning News: Parkland Requires A Turnaround Mind-Set If there was any doubt that tough and decisive hands-on leadership is needed at Parkland Memorial Hospital, recent headlines drive home the point: first, federal monitors’ most recent harsh critique of Parkland’s reform efforts, then the hospital’s stunning announcement last week that it is severely understaffed and in “crisis mode” (8/19).Health Policy Solutions: Peaceful Death At Risk When Emotion Overwhelms Good MedicineDoctors often try to dissuade patients and their families from seeking treatments they believe to be futile, and as a result, many choose instead to focus on care that enriches their quality of life. But there are some who challenge this practice, saying that doctors who discourage further treatment and allow patients to die comfortably and in peace are killing them. The critics suggest that doctors who recommend against further treatment show a lack of respect for the elderly, the disabled and the very sick. They say (maybe even believe) that doctors and hospitals have financial incentives for not treating them. They fail to accept that the reality is exactly the opposite (Dr. Aroop Mangalik, 8/19). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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State Roundup Federal Judge Says Milwaukee Can Raise Retiree Contribution

first_imgState Roundup: Federal Judge Says Milwaukee Can Raise Retiree Contribution A selection of health policy stories from California, Texas, Michigan, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Kansas and Oregon.The Dallas Morning News: Commissioners Approve Health Care Stipend For Gay, Unmarried EmployeesDallas County will give a stipend to unmarried and gay employees who provide health care benefits to their partners. County commissioners approved the new program in a narrow 3-2 vote, which was split along party lines. Democratic commissioners hailed the move as a way to attract and retain talent, embrace the county’s diversity and compete against private companies who already provide domestic partner benefits. Republican commissioners said the move, which is estimated to cost taxpayers $100,000 a year, made bad economic sense and was an end-run around state and federal laws barring gay marriage (Formby, 10/30).Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Federal Judge Rules Milwaukee County Could Shift Some Health Costs To RetireesMilwaukee County’s move to charge its retirees for some health care costs – a change made in 2012 that shifted millions of dollars in costs from taxpayers to retirees as well as active employees – was upheld in federal court Tuesday. U.S. District Judge William E. Callahan Jr. ruled against Esther Hussey, who retired from the county in 1991 after 35 years and said she was promised free health insurance. She worked primarily in the register of deeds office. Callahan sounded sympathetic to Hussey, 85, comparing her case to another in which Pabst Brewing retirees felt “an element of betrayal” over losing health benefits (Schultze, 10/30).HealthyCal: Permanent Housing Offers Stability For Those With Mental IllnessThe Mental Health Services Act approved by voters as Proposition 63 in 2004 provides more funding to county-based mental health programs. The funding from a 1 percent tax on personal income in excess of $1 million was expected to fund the implementation of treatment, prevention and early intervention programs for those with serious mental illness. Still, the cost of not serving the needs remains high. An experiment in Los Angeles, started in 2008, concluded that giving homeless residents permanent housing with no strings attached provides a savings to taxpayer (Flores, 10/31). The Texas Tribune: Senate Panel Takes Aim At Prescription Drug AbuseSpeaking Tuesday at a Senate panel hearing on prescription drug abuse, doctors and law enforcement officials touted the importance of agencies sharing information to more effectively look for pharmacies and doctors involved in the usage of prescription drugs outside of medically sanctioned purposes (Chammah, 10/30).The Dallas Morning News: Officials Unveil Plan To Eliminate Childhood Obesity In Dallas By 2020Community leaders met Tuesday to unveil a plan to eliminate childhood obesity in Dallas by 2020. The plan, named Charting the Course for a Healthy Future, was introduced at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children after nearly two years of planning by a coalition of more than 60 organizations and community leaders. “Reducing childhood obesity will have a profound impact on the health and quality of life for all North Texans,” said Susan Hoff, chief strategy officer of United Way of Metropolitan Dallas (Fancher, 10/30).(St. Paul) Pioneer Press: Watchdog: U Students Say New Health Insurance Process Causing HeadachesSome students at the University of Minnesota say they are being charged for the university health care plan, even though they have private insurance and notified the U of their coverage when they registered for class last spring. The problem appears to be related to a change in the university’s health insurance verification process. The new system uses electronic verification when students register for classes to confirm that students are covered by a private insurance provider. The glitch is that the system recognizes only five major providers: Blue Cross and Blue Shield, HealthPartners, Medica, MinnesotaCare, and Preferred One (Tritschler, 10/30). Kansas Health Institute News: Advocates Of Mid-Level Dental Care Prepare For Legislature Hays dentist Melinda Miner is one of a handful in her profession who publicly support licensing a new type of mid-level dental provider as a way to increase Kansans’ access to oral health care. She’s also among the relative few who will see Medicaid patients. “Only 25 percent of us see the problems,” Miner said. “Most dentists live in a different world. Their patients pay cash and can afford the expensive treatments. They don’t see the dental decay and the problems in people who can’t pay.” Miner was among about 25 people who met today in Topeka as part of the Kansas Dental Project, a coalition of advocacy groups seeking to improve dental care for children, the elderly and the medically underserved (Cauthon, 10/30).California Healthline: Payments Delayed To CBAS CentersCalifornia centers that offer adult day services are having trouble getting reimbursed for services provided to Medi-Cal beneficiaries under the state’s new Community Based Adult Day Services program launched on Oct. 1. “We are not getting paid. And I don’t know when we will get paid. I’m not expecting anything at this point,” said Manooch Pouransari, who runs the Grace Adult Day Health Care center in Santa Clara. “My experience is similar to many other centers,” he said. “We haven’t been told who to bill, where to bill, how to bill. And we found the same thing on their side, the MCOs (managed care organizations), they don’t know any of that, either” (Gorn, 10/31).The Lund Report: Member Insists OEBB Overpays For Prescription DrugsTamara Weaver questions why the Oregon Educators Benefit Board (OEBB) is paying more for prescription drugs through its mail order company than at Costco, her local retail pharmacy. OEBB is responsible for selecting the health plans for the majority of Oregon’s public school teachers, community colleges and state universities (Scharer, 10/30). This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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UnitedHealthcare Cuts Doctors From Medicare Advantage Plans

first_imgUnitedHealthcare is dropping 10 to 15 percent of its doctors from Medicare Advantage plans around the nation, a move that will force some seniors to find new doctors or change plans.The Columbus Dispatch: Medicare Insurer UnitedHealthcare Cuts Doctor Network UnitedHealthcare is dropping an undisclosed number of doctors from its Medicare Advantage provider network in Ohio, which will force some senior citizens to find new physicians or change plans, according to a physician-advocacy group. “This is one of the most significant (provider) network narrowings we’ve ever seen in the Medicare Advantage world,” said Todd Baker, director of professional relations with the Ohio State Medical Association. He said physicians have been receiving termination letters from UnitedHealthcare for about six weeks (Sutherly, 10/26). The Newark Star-Ledger: UnitedHealthcare Drops 10-15 Percent Of Its Doctors In Medicare Advantage Plans UnitedHealthcare this month began terminating contracts with physicians across the nation who participate in the Medicare Advantage plans, alarming doctors who say the move will disrupt their relationships with patients and make care harder to find. A UnitedHealthcare spokeswoman said the company is dropping 10 to 15 percent of its physicians nationwide, although she declined to say how many are affected in New Jersey. Doing so will save money and improve care, spokeswoman Mary McElrath-Jones (Livio, 10/26).  UnitedHealthcare Cuts Doctors From Medicare Advantage Plans This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Gov Kitzhaber Sweeps Out Cover Oregon Leadership Promises Reforms

first_imgAn analysis of the state marketplace by First Data released Thursday found serious problems with management and communications.The Oregonian: Kitzhaber Cleans House, Announces Reforms In Wake Of Cover Oregon Health Insurance Exchange ReportGov. John Kitzhaber announced a major managerial house-cleaning Thursday in response to the state’s ongoing health insurance exchange fiasco. Among those departing is perhaps Kitzhaber’s closest and most important health care reform ally, Bruce Goldberg, the Oregon Health Authority director who’s led Cover Oregon since January. Kitzhaber said he also asked the Cover Oregon board to remove Triz DelaRosa, chief operating officer for Cover Oregon, and Aaron Karjala, Cover Oregon’s chief information officer. “We have made mistakes and we will learn from it,” Kitzhaber said, following the release of an independent report highly critical of the state’s work on the project (Budnick, 3/20).The Oregonian: Republicans Pounce On Cover Oregon Problems, Point Fingers At Gov. John KitzhaberOpponents of Gov. John Kitzhaber were quick to paint the Democratic incumbent as out of touch and incompetent Thursday following the release of an investigation into the mishandled Cover Oregon project. The Republican Governors Association blasted out an email tying Kitzhaber to President Barack Obama’s healthcare plan, calling it “Oregon’s nightmare.” And the Republican frontrunner in the gubernatorial primary, state Rep. Dennis Richardson, piled on (Esteve, 3/20).The New York Times: Health Care Exchange In Oregon Not Meeting High Hopes As the federal health care overhaul was rolled out over the last few years, Oregon was invariably the eager overachiever in the first row, waving a hand to volunteer. The governor, John Kitzhaber, a doctor who left the emergency room for politics, made health care his main issue. … Yet for all that, by some measures Oregon has among the most dysfunctional online insurance exchanges in the nation. … On Thursday, a grim-faced Mr. Kitzhaber released a new report, commissioned by the state with a private company, that underscored how systemic Oregon’s failure has been (Johnson, 3/20).The Washington Post: After Disastrous Rollout, Oregon Considers Health Exchange Options Oregon Gov. John Kitzhaber (D) has fired the head of the state’s online health-care exchange — the second to leave the organization in three months — after chronic technical issues that left uninsured residents unable to purchase insurance mandated by the Affordable Care Act. Plagued by technical issues, breakdowns in supervisory management and shoddy work by an outside vendor that received tens of millions of dollars in state funding, Cover Oregon, the state’s online health insurance exchange has been one of the worst in the country (Wilson, 3/20). Gov. Kitzhaber Sweeps Out Cover Oregon Leadership, Promises Reforms This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

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Longer Looks The Readmission Cycle Opioids in Connecticut Medicare Scammers

first_img Mr. G was a patient well known to our multidisciplinary team at a safety-net hospital in Chicago. At this point, he had been readmitted to our hospital seven times in the previous six weeks, sometimes so short of breath that he couldn’t walk more than five steps before having to sit down. (Carolyn Dickens, Denise Weitzel and Stephen Brown, 3/7) Christine Grounds and Jonathan Mir shared their experience raising a son with microcephaly in a STAT video posted last week. Their candor — including an acknowledgement that she would have terminated the pregnancy had she known about Nicholas’s birth defect — has drawn strong reaction from viewers. (Emily Hager, 3/7) In a series of stories all this week, Trend CT uses data to better understand the state’s intractable drug-overdose problem. (Andrew Ba Tran, 3/7) In addition to using the inhaler my medical doctor gave me, there are a thousand things I am supposed to do to try and manage my asthma. Get allergy tests. Buy fancy vacuums and dust-mite covers for every fabric surface in my home. Give up my shelves of old books and vinyl records. Performing these acts of self-care is exhausting, expensive, and often difficult to measure in terms of results. The day of that acupuncture appointment, I was delivered a relatively easy diagnosis, a narrative that I could seize on to explain my ongoing illness to myself: I got sick because he died and I never recovered. (Manjula Martin, 3/3) Wired: Medicare Scammers Steal $60 Billion A Year. This Man Is Hunting Them U.S. News And World Report: Microcephaly: After Diagnosis, A Life Of Uncertainty If Willie Sutton had to choose a criminal career today, he’d be ripping off Medicare too. As the bank robber supposedly said: That’s where the money is. The program spends more than $600 billion a year on health care for 54 million people, most of them seniors. It is a massive pool of underguarded funds ripe for skimming. (J.C. Herz, 3/7) Microcephaly has been in the headlines in recent months as global health officials have turned their attention to the threat of Zika, a mosquito-borne virus believed to be linked to a surge of microcephaly cases in Brazil. The virus can be sexually transmitted, and the U.S. is bracing for the possibility that Zika may appear here as the weather gets warmer. Amid the hysteria over Zika, however, the families of the 25,000 children already diagnosed with microcephaly in the U.S. every year have been overlooked. According to the Foundation for Children with Microcephaly, the condition affects 2.5 percent of births each year. (Kimberly Leonard, 3/4) center_img Pacific Standard: Are My Emotions Making Me Sick? Longer Looks: The Readmission Cycle; Opioids in Connecticut; Medicare Scammers Each week, KHN’s Shefali Luthra finds interesting reads from around the Web. STAT: Raising A Child With Microcephaly: Outsiders ‘Cannot Know Our Experience’ This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription. Health Affairs: Mr. G And The Revolving Door: Breaking The Readmission Cycle At A Safety-Net Hospital Trend CT: Why Connecticut’s Drug Overdose Crisis Isn’t Slowing Down last_img read more

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Fast Charge 5 key battlegrounds for Google Stadia and the Nintendo Switch

first_img We’d also like to send you special offers and news just by email from other carefully selected companies we think you might like. Your personal details will not be shared with those companies – we send the emails and you can unsubscribe at any time. Please tick here if you are happy to receive these messages.By submitting your information, you agree to the Terms & Conditions and Privacy & Cookies Policy. Google has announced its new Stadia gaming platform, heralding a dawning age of video games via streaming. Can it take down the titan of Nintendo?“The future of gaming is not a box”, Google declared from the stage at E3. The future, the tech giant insists, is actually a cloud-based gaming platform — accessible from a multitude of devices including smartphones, laptops and tablets — that can run at a maximum of 4K quality at 60fps. All you’ll need to have is an internet connection and subscription.What does that leave for the Nintendo Switch? It’s a hybrid device rather than a ‘box’-style console in the traditional sense, and in fact it was a quiet revolution in its own right upon release in 2017, allowing gamers the freedom to play the same games on the go and on the TV screen. But does cloud gaming render it obsolete already? Casual gamers will have a tough choice to make, and below are the five battlegrounds we reckon the next console war will be fought over.Related: Best games consoleConnectivityThe distinguishing quality of Stadia is that it’s a gaming service built entirely around streaming. While that makes interminable download sessions a thing of the past, it also means that you will require a consistent internet connection to play. If you want to play the games in 4K HDR 60fps, Google reckon (optimistically) that you’ll need internet speeds of 35 Mbps, and the recommended minimum for the service is set at 10 Mbps.The necessity of an internet connection will naturally be restrictive — just going through a tunnel on your morning commute could mean Game Over. We’ll have to see if nationwide internet coverage is good enough to support the service, or whether the concept has just arrived a little too early.Meanwhile the Nintendo Switch can be played online and offline, like most consoles. You can download games to the console and play online multiplayer, but you can also lose yourself in a single-player campaign when no internet connection is available. This makes it ultimately more convenient and reliable than Stadia, even accounting for tedious download waiting times.PriceGoogle Stadia Pro will be available on a £8.99 ($9.99) subscription per month. No console is necessary, since you can access the game on most devices with a Chrome browser, including laptops and Smart TVs — so you’ll at least save some cash on a new gaming rig. This significantly lowers the entry price for new gamers. Not only that but you’ll have access to a library of older games with the Pro subscription (but you’ll still have to splash out on brand new games). In 2020, Stadia Base will launch for a lower price but there will be no games library included and high-end performance will be capped.The Nintendo Switch, by contrast, costs £280 ($300) up front for the console itself, and from there it costs as much as £60 for each new game. Where the Stadia’s performance will vary depending on your set-up, there’s a guaranteed performance standard with the Switch. It’s the traditional way of playing a console, but it’s still a higher barrier for entry, and Stadia’s low price might tempt customers away, but you will need to buy new controllers if you’d like to play with a bunch of mates.Overall the Stadia has a lower entry price which could tempt a large audience to sign up, but over time they may well become weary with yet another subscription service raiding their bank account every month.GamesStadia has already got a substantial library of games announced, including Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, Borderland 3, Final Fantasy XV, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider. You’ll immediately have access to this collection with Stadia Pro membership, but from there you’ll have to pay for each new game.Switch games can be bought either as digital copies from the Nintendo eStore, or as physical cartridges. While it covers many big games including FIFA 19, some notable blockbuster titles such as Call of Duty are not found on this platform. However, the clincher is that Nintendo will have its familiar stable of Mario etc. games that players have known and loved since childhood. There’s no chance you’ll be playing Mario Kart on the Stadia, and that’s a big blow to hopes of capturing casual fans’ hearts.HardwareStadia can be played on almost any device with a Chrome browser — that means laptops, smart TVs, tablets, and Pixel smartphones (with more smartphones given access further down the line). If you’ve already got one of these devices, there will be no need to fork out additional money for a dedicated console — but there will be official controllers for gameplay, which look very similar to those of the PlayStation 4.The Switch is a chameleon of a console, which can be played as a handheld device or as a controller connected to a TV screen. Just slip off the Joy-Con controllers and slide them onto the tablet to take games on the go. It’s handy for sure, but can’t compete with the handiness of just using your existing smart devices to play games. However, the advantage of a single console is the knowledge that it will remain usable throughout its lifecycle, and will not require upgrading.BrandGoogle might be one of the biggest names in tech, but Stadia is still something of an unknown quantity. We know how passionate die-hard fans can be about their consoles, such as Xbox and Playstation, so it will definitely be hard for a new rival to appear on the stage with an entirely new concept to sell.Nintendo is a well-loved company with a huge and dedicated fanbase spanning generations. They’ve already sold 35 million Switch consoles. Their grip on the market, significantly strengthened by their instantly-recognisable exclusive games, is a formidable challenge for Google to overcome, especially as they’re likely to compete in that same market space of casual gamers.VerdictThe convenience and accessibility of Stadia may well be the future of gaming, at least for casual fans who like to dip in and out of a game, and would otherwise be put off by high price of entry for a traditional console. But Nintendo is likely to hold strong for now thanks to consumer’s deep familiarity with its carefully cultivated and much-loved brand. Sign up for the Mobile NewsletterSign Up Please keep me up to date with special offers and news from Goodtoknow and other brands operated by TI Media Limited via email. You can unsubscribe at any time. Show More Unlike other sites, we thoroughly review everything we recommend, using industry standard tests to evaluate products. We’ll always tell you what we find. We may get a commission if you buy via our price links.Tell us what you think – email the Editorcenter_img This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply. Opinionlast_img read more

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Teslas massive Powerpack battery in Australia cost 66 million and already made

We have already seen several pieces of evidence that Tesla’s massive Powerpack battery project in Australia is quite financially successful, but now we get all the numbers as Neoen, Tesla’s partner in the project, files for IPO.The giant battery cost ~$66 million and it reportedly already made up to $17 million during the first ~6 months of operation. more… Source: Charge Forward

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Lincoln Aviator PlugIn Hybrid To Cost Nearly 90000

first_img Lincoln Aviator At 2018 New York Auto Show – Live Photos & Videos Lincoln Aviator Plug-In Hybrid SUV Spied Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on January 27, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News 2020 Lincoln Aviator Lands In LA With Potent Plug-In Power There’s plenty of elegance inside, too, and now we know exactly how much all that grandeur will cost. You can step into a Standard trim Aviator for $52,195, but going all-out for a fully loaded Black Label Grand Touring hybrid tips the scale at $91,145. Both prices include delivery and other assorted fees.Plug-In Hybrid Gets ExpensiveHow far does your hard-earned money go in the Aviator world? We’ll start with a close look at the Black Label Grand Touring, which checks nearly all the option boxes right off the bat. The model starts at $88,895 and comes fully equipped with the luxury and dynamic handling packages, the latter of which includes adaptive suspension and air-ride components. Adaptive steering is in there, not to mention all-wheel drive with the high-end 21-inch wheels. It’s also fitted with Lincoln’s hybrid powertrain – a 3.0-liter twin-turbo V6 connected to a ten-speed automatic. Details on that system are still being sussed out, but Lincoln says it should produce a projected 450 horsepower (336 kilowatts) and a whopping 600 pound-feet (813 Newton-meters) of torque.center_img Source: Electric Vehicle News Base models are still well-equipped and start at $52,195.We’ve been rather impressed with the new Lincoln Aviator since the prototype first broke cover last year at the New York Auto Show. The production model arrived just a couple months ago for the LA Auto Show, looking quite similar to its concept-cousin. That’s a good thing, because the swooping lines and acres of tinted rear greenhouse combine to create a refreshingly elegant SUV.More Aviator Inside, the Black Label Grand Touring comes standard with the upgraded Revel 28-speaker sound system, navigation, 30-way heated/massaging seats, a panoramic roof, and lots of leather as well. Only two options are available – the class IV trailer tow package for $500 and a special coat of Chroma Caviar Dark Gray paint, costing $1,750. All total that brings us to $91,145.On the flip side, the Standard model isn’t exactly a barebones grocery getter. It powers the rear wheels with a 400-hp (298-kW) twin-turbo V6, treats front-seat passengers to 10-way heated seats, and the cool glass cockpit with SYNC 3 and Lincoln’s Co-Pilot360 driver assist suite is also included – as it is on all Aviator models.Order banks for the new Aviator will open next month, with production models arriving at dealerships in the spring.last_img read more

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Aurora and Fiat Chrysler launch selfdriving commercial vehicle partnership

first_imgAurora, the self-driving startup that already has relationships with a number of automakers, has just announced its newest collaboration, working with Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) on self-driving commercial vehicle platforms. more…Subscribe to Electrek on YouTube for exclusive videos and subscribe to the podcast.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1zk7Eb8r-s&list=PL_Qf0A10763mA7Byw9ncZqxjke6Gjz0MtThe post Aurora and Fiat Chrysler launch self-driving commercial vehicle partnership appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Corporate Deal Tracker Texas Lawyers Stay Busy Despite Wacky MA Climate

first_img Remember me Username Lost your password? Passwordcenter_img The value of M&A transactions in the energy sector plummeted 65 percent during in the first half of 2016. Overall corporate deals worth $500 million or more were down by 13 percent. Billion-dollar plus transactions were down 19 percent. Private deals are up. Deals involving bankruptcy assets are up. The Texas Lawbook’s exclusive Corporate Deal Tracker has all the M&A data from H1 2016 and predictions for the rest of the year . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

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Liberty Mutual Corporate Counsel Kimberly Houston Sees the Bigger Picture

first_img Lost your password? Username Kimberly Houston’s fascination with the law may have begun with “Matlock,” but it’s grown into an expertise on such weighty subjects as employment misclassification and regulatory compliance. As Corporate Counsel for Liberty Mutual, the insurance giant, Houston has wrestled with large-scale undertakings, from a class action defense to the development of the company’s new corporate campus in North Texas. And now she’s a finalist in the Outstanding Corporate Counsel Awards. Read about her in The Texas Lawbook.You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Passwordcenter_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

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Research explores whether too many patents stifle progress in biomedicine

first_img Source:https://www.utah.edu/ Jul 27 2018New research published by University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law Professor Jorge Contreras in Science this week explores the current state of sharing resources in the biomedical research field and whether the fragmentation of property ownership can stifle research progress, instead of advancing it.Contreras’ essay “The anticommons at 20: concerns for research continue”examines complicated questions about intellectual property rights and the creation of new products to improve human health in connection with the 20thanniversary of prominent research that explored the same issues two decades ago.In 1998, researchers Michael A. Heller and Rebecca S. Eisenberg published “Can Patents Deter Innovation? The Anticommons in Biomedical Research” in Science. In their research, the duo used the “tragedy of the commons” metaphor introduced by Garrett Hardin in 1968 and applied it to the biomedical research field. While Hardin’s “tragedy of the commons” suggests that people overuse shared resources because they don’t have an incentive to conserve, Heller and Eisenberg suggested that biomedical researchers could suffer from a different affliction — an “anticommons” — because people underuse resources that are owned by many in small portions because of ensuing battles over intellectual property rights. Such behavior can result in development of fewer products -;a trend that potentially can stall important breakthroughs for bettering health. Heller and Eisenberg suggested that the “anticommons” in biomedical research is one reason the privatization of biomedical research needed to be considered carefully.Related StoriesScientists develop universal FACS-based approach to heterogenous cell sorting, propelling organoid researchComplement system shown to remove dead cells in retinitis pigmentosa, contradicting previous researchOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchTwenty years later, concerns for research advancement on this front continue, Contreras writes in the newly published Sciencefindings. His new essay examines whether predictions by Heller and Eisenberg made 20 years ago came true and what these outcomes can teach society today.”Even though most would agree that the patent-fueled anticommons that Heller and Eisenberg predicted for biomedical research did not come to pass, their fundamental insight about the dangers of over-propertization and fragmentation of ownership are still important today,” said Contreras.”For example, instead of patents, many companies are now using trade secrets to cordon off large areas of research. And there are proposals being made to give individuals ownership of data about themselves, data that used to be beyond the reach of property laws. Anticommons could arise in these areas, even without patents.”Contreras noted that public policy discussions around how to address these issues continue. He has provided suggestions to ease the blocking of ideas that too-restrictive property regimes can create.”I’ve recommended, for example, that data ownership not be parceled out to every living individual, because doing that would make biomedical research much harder to conduct, which could deprive us of discoveries that could otherwise have life-saving impact. This is the message that Heller and Eisenberg had twenty years ago: be careful about assigning property interests too widely, because the result could be gridlock,” said Contreras.last_img read more

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Chagas disease causes chronic heart disease and has spread outside of Latin

first_imgAug 20 2018Chagas disease, caused by infection with a parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi (T cruzi), causes chronic heart disease in about one third of those infected. Over the past 40 years, Chagas disease has spread to areas where it had not traditionally been seen, including the United States, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.The statement. summarizes the most up-to-date information on diagnosis, screening and treatment of T cruzi infection. Infection occurs when feces from the infected blood sucking insect triatomine enters the skin through the bite site or in the eye. Triatomine insects are found in Central and South America, where they infest adobe houses and in the Southern United States. The disease can also be passed through contaminated food or drink, from pregnant mothers to their babies, and through blood transfusions and organ transplants.The health risks of Chagas disease are well-known in Latin America where most cases are found in countries that include Brazil, Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay, Mexico and El Salvador. However, doctors outside of Latin America are largely unaware of the infection and its connection to heart disease. Countries where infected individuals have been diagnosed include the United States with an estimated 300,000 cases, Spain with at least 42,000 cases, Italy, France, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Australia and Japan.”This statement aims to increase global awareness among physicians who manage patients with Chagas disease outside of traditionally endemic environments,” said Maria Carmo Pereira Nunes, M.D., Ph.D, co-chair of the committee that produced the statement. “This document will help healthcare providers and health systems outside of Latin America recognize, diagnose and treat Chagas disease and prevent further disease transmission,” said Pereira Nunes, who is a cardiologist at the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.Related StoriesImplanted device uses microcurrent to exercise heart muscle in cardiomyopathy patientsNew method improves detection of atrial fibrillation in stroke survivorsMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorAlthough 60-70 percent of people infected with T cruzi never develop any symptoms, those that do can develop heart disease, including heart failure, stroke, life threatening ventricular arrhythmias (heart rhythm abnormalities) and cardiac arrest. In the Americas, Chagas disease is responsible for more than seven times as many disability-adjusted life-years lost as malaria. However, if caught early, an infection can be cured with medications that have a 60 to 90 percent success rate, depending on when in the course of infection the patient is treated.”Early detection of Chagas disease is critical, allowing prompt initiation of therapy when the evidence for cure is strong,” said statement co-author Caryn Bern, M.D., M.P.H., professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of California in San Francisco.The risk of infection is extremely low for most travelers and residents of endemic countries. To minimize risk, people should avoid sleeping in houses with un-plastered adobe walls and/or thatch roofs, and avoid unpasteurized sugar cane juice, açai fruit juice and other juices when visiting affected countries. Source:https://newsroom.heart.org/news/chagas-disease-caused-by-a-parasite-has-spread-outside-of-latin-america-and-carries-a-high-risk-of-heart-disease?preview=23a47636aa174da9a0961e83215ae416last_img read more

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Health insurance ads have shifted over time due to health plans offered

first_img Source:https://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2018/aca-health-insurance-ads-targeted-younger-healthier-consumers.html Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Sep 21 2018The themes in television advertisements for health insurance plans have shifted over time, possibly reflecting the shrinking pool of health plans offered through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as well as rising plan premiums, according to a study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.In the study, published online in the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law, the researchers analyzed the volume and content of media messages included in insurance advertisements that were aired over a million times in the U.S. from late 2013 through spring 2016. One key finding: explicit mentions of Obamacare or ACA declined sharply.”These marketplace health plans that became available following the passage of the health care law under President Obama were heavily government-subsidized and contributed to substantial declines in uninsurance rates in the U.S.,” says study lead author Colleen L. Barry, PhD, the Fred and Julie Soper Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Bloomberg School. “Yet, in the absence of an explicit mention of the law in ads, newly insured individuals may not have appreciated the connection between the law and the health benefits they were receiving.”The ACA, often called Obamacare, is a major health policy initiative enacted in 2010 that led to the introduction of new marketplace plans designed to make it easier for consumers to access health care through the individual and small group insurance market starting in 2014. Television ads for ACA plans, which are sponsored mostly by private insurers and through state and federal enrollment efforts, first began marketing to consumers in late fall 2013.For the study, through the Wesleyan Media Project at Wesleyan University, the researchers obtained a database of video files for all of the health insurance-related television ads that aired in U.S. media markets during the first three ACA open-enrollment periods in 2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16. The study authors took a random sample of the ads, ending up with 875 unique advertisements that represented 1,074,653 airings in all 50 states.The researchers viewed and coded each ad for characteristics including: the type of people featured in the ads, the activities they were engaged in, the references to ACA or Obamacare, and the messages about various benefits of the health plans available.One finding, not unexpected, was that overtime the ads increasingly included content aimed at selling policies to younger, healthier people, whose enrollment in large numbers is essential to the long-term plan solvency. Relatively few airings focused on elderly or disabled people, smokers or people receiving medical care in a hospital or clinic–the kinds of people who tend to generate more costly health insurance claims.Related StoriesDOJ lawyers try new tricks to undo Obamacare. Will it work?New federal health insurance rule could help millions of Americans save money on drugs and careFamily members’ drugs may be risk factor for overdose in individuals without prescriptions”What we saw over the three enrollment periods is that as costs became a greater concern for insurers, advertising increasingly targeted so-called ‘young invincibles’–younger and healthy individuals who may be tempted to forego insurance,” Barry says.The researchers also noted a shift, over the three open enrollment periods, toward messages emphasizing the availability of financial assistance with premiums, and away from messages emphasizing plan choice. The trend corresponded to sharp increases in average ACA plan premiums and reductions in plan choice as some major insurers pulled out of ACA marketplaces.Even more dramatic, Barry and her colleagues found, was the trend towards ads that did not mention ACA. “By the third enrollment period in 2016 only about 10 percent of the airings by non-government sponsors specifically referred to ACA or Obamacare,” Barry says. “So there was a real movement by those sponsors to avoid connecting their products with the law itself.”The researchers suggest that this trend may relate to a low level of public understanding of ACA, which advertisers may have increasingly recognized and accommodated–and which in turn may have worsened the public’s understanding.”Public opinion data have shown consistently that many Americans do not understand the key components of the law or believe they have benefited from it,” Barry says.The researchers worry that not making clear the connection between an individual’s health care and a major government program is problematic–not just for ACA but for government-sponsored programs generally. They cite the political scientist Suzanne Mettler, who has argued that public support for governmental programs will remain low, and indeed trust in government will remain low, insofar as citizens fail to see the benefits they receive from the government.”If we want the public to understand the value of major government initiatives like ACA, then it is important to highlight these connections between health care benefits and government initiatives more explicitly,” Barry says.”Assessing the Content of Television Health Insurance Advertising during Three Open Enrollment Periods of the ACA” was written by Colleen L. Barry, Sachini Bandara, Kimberly Arnold, Jessie Pintor, Laura Baum, Jeff Niederdeppe, Pinar Karaca-Mandic, Erika Franklin Fowler and Sarah Gollust.last_img read more

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Senate advances secret science bill setting up possible showdown with White House

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Republicans in Congress appear to be headed for a showdown with the White House over controversial “secret science” legislation aimed at changing how the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) uses scientific studies. A deeply divided Senate panel yesterday advanced a bill that would require EPA to craft its policies based only on public data available to outside experts. The House of Representatives has already passed a similar measure. But Democrats and science groups have harshly criticized the approach, and the White House has threatened a veto.The House and Senate bills are the product of long-standing complaints—mostly from conservative lawmakers—that EPA relies too heavily on raw data that are not easily available to outsiders. Republicans on the House science committee, for instance, have been waging a long-running battle with EPA officials over the release of health data used to support air pollution regulations. The bill’s opponents, however, say the calls for transparency are aimed at blocking the agency from using certain types of confidential data, potentially delaying or imperiling new environmental regulations to industry’s gain.Both perspectives got airtime during yesterday’s debate in the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works over S. 544, the Secret Science Reform Act. It would require EPA to base all its rules, assessments, and guidance on data that is “transparent” and “reproducible.” The legislation, sponsored by Senator John Barrasso (R–WY), serves as a companion to a measure that the House approved last month mostly with GOP votes. Emailcenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Democrats on the panel objected to the Republican majority’s plan to vote on the bill, arguing that the panel had not yet held any hearings on the legislation. (The House did hold hearings on its bill in previous sessions of Congress). “We are considering a legislative conclusion before we have done the legislative investigation,” said Senator Ed Markey (D–MA), one of several Democrats who called for shelving the bill until a hearing could occur.Panel leaders rejected that idea, and the bill cleared the committee on an 11 to 9 party-line vote. Prior to that vote, Republicans beat back a couple of Democratic-sponsored amendments: one that would have restored EPA’s ability to rely on any peer-reviewed science, and another that would have required EPA to disclose only the funding sources, not the raw data, of studies the agency wants to use. Barrasso said the amendments would “defeat the purpose of the bill.”On a voice vote, the committee did adopt an amendment that would prohibit any effort to bar EPA and other federal scientists from using common scientific terms. In offering the amendment, Senator Barbara Boxer (D–CA), the committee’s top Democrat, said she was alarmed by efforts by Republican officials in Florida and Wisconsin to allegedly bar certain state employees from talking about climate change.Democrats say they plan to use the bill to call out Republicans for their party’s rejection of climate science. And Boxer lashed out at Republicans for supporting the measure just after the panel had advanced another bill that would give EPA more power to request data on chemicals’ risks and to regulate toxic substances. “This is insane, it’s just a joke,” Boxer said.The secret science bills represent just one front in Republicans’ efforts to attack President Barack Obama’s environmental agenda, which they view as too costly to businesses and the economy. House Republicans have also pushed a bill to overhaul how EPA obtains scientific advice from its panel of independent scholars, and another measure to boost public participation and agencies’ data disclosure and analysis requirements. All three bills, approved by the House on mostly party-line votes, have received veto threats from the White House.White House officials—along with Democrats, a bevy of scientific organizations, and public-interest groups—argue that the secret science legislation would force EPA to ignore numerous studies. They say that not only do many studies contain public health or industry-submitted data that are confidential, but the legislation provides too little funding for EPA to obtain all the necessary raw data. And many studies, such as longitudinal surveys, are not realistically “reproducible,” scientific organizations worry.S. 544 now moves to the full Senate, which could act on it at any time. The House and Senate would then have to reconcile any differences in their bills and approve one measure to send to the White House—where it’s sure to meet a cold reception.last_img read more

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Trump and next Congress could quickly erase scores of major regulations

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Under a seldom used law, the next Congress could quickly overturn more than 100 major regulations recently finalized by the Obama administration, including rules that aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, protect sensitive environments from energy development, improve nutrition labels on food products, and regulate electronic cigarettes.And once Congress has acted to reject a regulation, federal agencies are barred from reissuing “substantially similar” rules unless lawmakers allow it. That draconian possibility – allowed under the 1996 Congressional Review Act (CRA) – has set off alarm bells among numerous interest groups, including environmental, labor and public health organizations. The CRA was crafted by former Representative Newt Gingrich (R-GA) – now a major supporter of President-elect Donald Trump – and his anti-regulation Republican allies in the 1990s. It aims to prevent outgoing administrations from pushing through so-called “midnight regulations” – rules finalized in the last months of a presidency — by giving Congress 60 days to review new rules (days only count while Congress is in session). If a simple majority of lawmakers in both the Senate and House of Representatives votes to reject a rule, and the president signs the resolution, the rule is vacated. And the agency isn’t allowed to try again to write a similar rule unless lawmakers approve. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Since the CRA was created, however, lawmakers have been able to use it just once to erase a rule (a 2000 regulation related to workplace ergonomics). That’s because sitting Presidents are unlikely to go along with efforts to undo regulations produced by their own administrations. President Barack Obama, for example, has vetoed five CRA resolutions to overturn rules produced by his administration.“The CRA isn’t used unless the stars align perfectly,” says Amit Narang, a regulatory policy expert at Public Citizen, a public interest group in Washington, D.C.  But now the election of Donald Trump and a Republican-controlled Congress has opened a rare window for potentially expansive use of the CRA. That’s because President Trump is likely to sign any regulation-cutting resolutions sent to him by his Congressional allies.“You can see why [the CRA] is so powerful,” Narang says. “You are not just rolling the regulation back, but almost putting a permanent injunction on it.”“[M]ore than 150 significant rules published since mid-May could be subject to CRA disapproval next year,” Susan Dudley, director of the Regulatory Studies Center at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., wrote in Forbes. (Generally, “significant” rules are those deemed by agencies to carry high costs or have broad impacts.)The list includes regulations on wastewater from fracking operations, drilling for oil in the Arctic, school nutrition standards, and reducing emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The CRA does not apply to rules finalized before late May, such as the controversial Clean Power Plan. But it may apply to a much debated rule on who should be paid for working overtime, which applied to postdoctoral students working at universities; it was issued on 23 May, which may be just outside the CRA envelope.One conservative analyst, Clyde Wayne Crews Jr. of the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington, D.C., has identified a long list of recent significant rules that he says Congress should consider repealing. But he says that many more rules that agencies haven’t deemed significant should also get a skeptical look from lawmakers. Overall, some 1,400 regulations appear to fall into the CRA window, although many deal with relatively non-controversial topics, such as importing avocados from Mexico.The CRA will also apply to any rules that the Obama administration may issue later this year, including a plan to revise rules for protecting human research subjects that has drawn opposition from some scientists. In some cases, the administration might decide against issuing a final rule, in order to prevent the next Congress from closing the door to similar regulations in a future administration. Even that strategy could fail, however, if a Trump administration decides to finalize a leftover rule – and then invite the Republican Congress to reject it.last_img read more

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